StatTiger

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StatTiger last won the day on November 28 2016

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  1. Passing on 1st down (2016): Last season Auburn was No. 121 nationally in the percentage of pass attempts made on 1st down. The national average was 38.4% and Auburn checked in at 21.1%. Auburn was No. 36 nationally when it came to pass-efficiency on 1st down. Auburn was No. 5 nationally in completion percentage on 1st down. Auburn was No. 40 nationally in yards per pass attempt on 1st down. Auburn was No. 98 nationally in yards per pass completion on 1st down. Auburn was No. 120 nationally in the average number of pass attempts on 1st down per game. The Tigers averaged 6.8 pass attempts on 1st down per game and the national average was 12.2 per game. Auburn was No. 126 nationally in TD ratio, passing on 1st down. Auburn averaged a TD pass every 88 pass attempts on 1st attempt, with the national average being 1 every 18.7 attempts. War Eagle!
  2. Passing rating of 130 or better in the SEC: From 2000-2008 (1320 games), SEC teams had a pass rating of at least 130 during 44.5 percent of the games. Teams with a pass-rating of at least 130, compiled a win percentage of .821. From 2009-2016 (1368 games), SEC teams had a pass rating of at least 130 during 53.7 percent of the games. Reaching a pass rating of at least 130 meant a win percentage of .819. During the past eight seasons (2009-2016), we have witnessed an increase of 20.7 percent in passing games with a rating of at least 130, compared to the nine seasons from 2000 to 2008. Overall, teams in the SEC averaged 212.7 yards passing per game from 2000 to 2008. SEC teams from 2009-2016 have averaged 221.5 yards passing per game, a 4.1 percent increase in passing yardage per game. Though there has been an increase in games with 130 pass ratings, the win percentage is basically the same. During the time span Malzahn has been at Auburn from 2009-2011 and 2013-2016, the Auburn pass-offense ranks No. 5 out of the 14 teams in terms of producing a 130 pass-rating. The league average is 53.2% and Auburn is No. 5 at 61.3%. Arkansas, Alabama, Texas A&M and Georgia finished higher than Auburn. Looking back at the last 17 teams to win the SEC Championship (2000-2016), the average national ranking in pass-efficiency is No. 17. The average national ranking in pass-efficiency for the MNC winner during the same time period is No. 13.
  3. In this day & age of college football, coaches are looking more to efficiency and consistency than sophistication. Current NCAA rules limit the time spent with players more than ever. It has also limited the amount of time for full contact during practice. We are seeing more "system" oriented offenses to take advantage of the athletic ability at the skill positions, including the quarterback position. We are seeing more spread offenses that go no huddle. Because of the limitations by the NCAA, offensive coaches are looking for ways to keep things simplistic, placing more of an emphasis on execution. See the following feature... http://smartfootball.com/tag/passing-game#sthash.5p3fJA1Y.dpbs During the time span Malzahn has been at Auburn from 2009-2011 and 2013-2016, the Auburn pass-offense ranks No. 5 out of the 14 teams in terms of producing a 130 pass-rating. The league average is 53.2% and Auburn is No. 5 at 61.3%. Arkansas, Alabama, Texas A&M and Georgia finished higher than Auburn. It is very difficult running a west coast offense in a no huddle, tempo styled offense. There would be no way to get a play called because of the verbiage involved in calling a play. It would also limit the number of freshman and sophomore QB's learning a complicated pass offense well enough to execute it as the "starter". System oriented offenses have resulted in more younger QB's starting early and having success. Like ANY other team, a more talented player at the QB position will make ANY pass offense look better. Auburn is not the only team that benefited from having an good to great quarterback. Plug in said quarterback into Malzahn's offense and the passing game is extremely efficient. I do believe Malzahn's pass-offense needed a change in an effort to give the offense some growth and to limit the predictability factor. I believe they have it in Chip Lindsey but at the end of the day, the caliber of quarterback within the system will make the MOST difference in terms of efficiency and productivity. During seasons with Todd, Newton and Marshall as the starter, Auburn reached the 130 rating 70.3% of the time. During the three seasons without them as the starting QB, AU reached the 130 rating during 48.7% of their games.
  4. From 2000-2016 teams in the SEC compiled a combined win percentage of .926, when rushing for at least 150-yards, while averaging 8.5 yards per pass attempt. Establish the run and have a consistent vertical passing game will win a high percentage of games.
  5. 200-yard rushing games by teams in the SEC: From 2000-2008 (1320 games), there was a 200-yard rushing game during 26.1 percent of the games. Teams that rushed for at least 200-yards compiled a win percentage of .843. From 2009-2016 (1368 games), there was a 200-yard rushing game during 39.6 percent of the games. Teams rushing for at least 200-yards during a game, won .862 percent of their games. During the past eight seasons (2009-2016), we have witnessed an increase of 51.7 percent in 200-yard rushing games, compared to the nine seasons from 2000 to 2008. Overall, teams in the SEC averaged 153.6 yards rushing per game from 2000 to 2008. SEC teams from 2009-2016 have averaged 180.8 yards rushing per game, a 17.7 percent increase in rushing yardage per game. Average number of 200-yard rushing games by teams in the SEC: 1989: 4.2 (Year before Steve Spurrier arrives at UF.) 1992: 3.7 1999: 1.4 2000: 2.1 2001: 2.6 2002: 4.0 (Year after Steve Spurrier left UF.) 2003: 3.2 2004: 4.1 2005: 2.1 2006: 2.7 2007: 4.1 2008: 3.5 2009: 4.7 2010: 4.8 2011: 4.3 2012: 4.4 2013: 6.4 2014: 5.4 2015: 5.0 2016: 5.8 200-Yard rushing games from 2012-2016: Alabama ............ 42 Auburn .............. 40 LSU ................... 35 Georgia .............. 32 Miss State .......... 31 Arkansas ............ 25 Tennessee .......... 25 Ole Miss ............. 24 Florida ............... 20 Kentucky ........... 20 S. Carolina ......... 19 Texas A&M ........ 15 Vanderbilt ......... 13 Missouri ............ 13 Note the high number of SEC-West teams at the top of the list.
  6. Perhaps the most important aspect to watch for in 2017 regarding the Auburn offense, is Chip Lindsey's play-calling on first down. How often will Auburn throw the football on first down and what will the play selections be? Running the football too frequently was an issue but it was also compounded by the lack of variety in the run plays called on first down. Numbers and Notes on 1st down plays: During the past decade, teams at the FBS level averaged 5.87 yards per play on first down. Auburn has averaged 5.79 yards per play on first down. Gus Malzahn's collegiate offense (2006-2016) averaged 6.44 yards per play on first down, including 6.20 yards while at Auburn. Teams have thrown the ball 38.9 percent on first down. Auburn has thrown the football 24 percent on first down. Teams averaged 4.66 yards per run on first down and 7.78 yards per pass attempt. Auburn averaged 5.18 yards per run and 7.74 yards per pass. If you were to examine the teams that finished in the nation's top-20 of yards per play on first down, those teams threw the ball 32.5 percent of the time on first down during the past decade. The top-20 teams averaged 7.09 yards per play on first down, with 5.63 yards rushing and 9.43 yards per pass attempt. Auburn finished in the top-20 on two occasions from 2007-2016. (2010 and 2013) Teams finishing in the nation's top-20 of first down offense combined for a win percentage of .706. The top-20 teams averaging at least 9-yards per pass attempt on first down, won .725 of their games. When Malzahn's offense averages at least 6-yards per play on first down, his offense has won .847 of their games, while averaging 525-yards and 42 PPG. At Auburn Malzahn has won .868 of his games with at least 6-yards per play on first down, averaging 510-yards and 41.8 PPG. The issue for Malzahn at Auburn is the offense has reached 6-yards per play on first down in only 40.8 percent of their games, including 28 percent over the past two seasons. Malzahn's run percentage of 75.1 percent on first down from 2006-2016 has made his offense extremely predictable, especially at Auburn. During the past four seasons, Auburn has run the ball 78.8 percent of the time on first down. During his inaugural season at Auburn (2009), the Tigers threw 10 TD passes on first down. During the last three seasons combined (2014-2016), Auburn threw for 8 TD passes on first down. During his seven seasons at Auburn, Malzahn's offense averaged over 9-yards per pass on first down, one time (2010). When held under 6-yards per play on first down, Malzahn's "Auburn" offense combined for a 32-22 record, averaging 390-yards and 28 PPG. War Eagle!
  7. The recent struggles of the Auburn offense during the past two seasons brought about the departure of Rhett Lashlee and the hiring of Chip Lindsey to revamp the Tigers offense. The miscues on offense have also tightened the pressure around Gus Malzahn as he prepares to enter his fifth season as Auburn's head coach. The 2017 season will be a focal one as Malzahn might not be able to survive another five-loss season, especially if the quandary on offense continues. Coach Malzahn believes Chip Lindsey is the answer to making the Auburn offense potent again, particularly when it comes to the passing game. Watching Auburn's offense average 268-yards and 15 points per game during the last four Power-5 games of the season, made it easy to toss the baby out with the bathwater. Though some recognized Auburn's key injuries, many considered the final numbers as the final death-blow to a once dangerous Malzahn offense. On the surface, it appeared his offense had become predictable, conservative and the deficiencies in the passing game were undeniable. In reality, the lack of quality play at the quarterback position can bring most offenses to its knees. Something to consider... Sean White has been the most consistent performer at the quarterback position the last two years, but his inability to remain healthy has prevented the offense from maximizing its full potential. When White and his cohorts were healthy, the offense produced quality numbers. Here is a breakdown of the two years worth of "healthy" competition. This stretch of 12-games with a healthy Sean White included the Mississippi State game through the Ole Miss game of 2015 and the Arkansas State through Ole Miss period of 2016. I left out the Clemson game because of the irrational game plan subjected against the eventual National Champions. During the 12 games with a healthy Sean White Auburn... Averaged 482-yards and 35 points per game. Averaged 268-yards rushing, primarily with a pocket passer. Converted 49 percent of their third-downs. Averaged 6.21 yards per play on first down. Scored on 50 percent of their offensive possessions with the goal being at least 1/3. Went "3 & out" only 19 percent of the time with the goal of keeping it under 25 percent. Averaged 39.6 yards gained per possession with the statistical goal of at least 30-yards per possession. Scored a touchdown every 19.6 plays with the goal being one every 17 plays. Scored touchdowns inside the red zone during 55.9 percent of their possessions, with the goal being at least 60 percent. Passer rating of 149.1 with the goal being at least 130, completing 64 percent of their passes for an impressive 8.4 yards per pass attempt. Averaged 8.4 impact plays per game with the goal being at least 8 per game. Averaged an impact play every 9.3 plays, with the goal being one every eight plays. The above numbers showed the potential of the offense with a consistent performer at the quarterback position, but there remained a few concerns. Concerns: Though the 482-yards were impressive, Auburn should have averaged closer to 40 points per game with that kind of yardage production than the 35 per game they did average. Part of the problem with the scoring output was the lack of production inside the red zone. The TD percentage of only 55.9 percent inside the red zone was horrible, preventing the Tigers from maximizing their scoring drives. During the 12 games with a healthy Sean White, Auburn ran the ball over 80 percent of the time on first down. Becoming run-heavy on first down was the origin of Auburn's predictability and an example of a lack of confidence in the passing game. Despite Auburn putting up efficient numbers in the passing game, Malzahn elected to be conservative when it came to first down. Auburn's lack of impact plays is a direct result of the passing game rarely being featured. Keep in mind that over 67 percent of the plays of 20-yards or more at the FBS level were pass plays during the 2016 season. The level of Competition: Some will point to the offensive success under a healthy Sean White coming against inferior competition. Though there is validity in this statement, it doesn't change the fact that Auburn was more productive on offense with a healthy Sean White. Some of Auburn's lack of success with a healthy White had more to do with player personnel and play-calling. During the 2015 season with a healthy Sean White, Auburn averaged 3.1 percent more yardage than their opponent generally allowed and scored 8.6 percent more than the opponent allowed. During the 2016 season with a healthy Sean White, the offense gained 28.9 percent more yardage and scored 40.6 percent more than the opponent usually allowed. The offense was much more efficient with a healthy White in 2016 than 2015. Moving Forward: So what will Chip Lindsey bring to the table, Rhett Lashlee could not bring? In all fairness to Coach Lashlee, he was only behind the steering wheel of the offense for about 5-6 games during the 2016 season. Though Gus Malzahn publicly stated he was turning the play-calling duties over to Lashlee, Malzahn became more involved once the injuries mounted later in the season. Once again, Gus Malzahn has publicly committed to turning the reigns of the offense over to Chip Lindsey. Only time will tell how committed Gus Malzahn will be to this concept. Lindsey does appear to have a stronger history in quarterback development than Rhett Lashlee. Coach Lindsey's pass-offense is heavily influenced by the Air-Raid concept, rather than Gus Malzahn's passing schemes. The logical plan is to incorporate Malzahn's running schemes with Lindsey's passing schemes to bring about a new evolution to the Auburn offense. Neither passing system has featured the tight end position in the passing game, but Lindsey does feature the running backs more frequently. Under Malzahn, the Auburn offense has averaged 39 receptions at the RB position per season. Under Lindsey, the running backs averaged 78 receptions per season. The Auburn pass-offense is in dire need of a vertical punch, and it remains to be seen whether or not Lindsey can bring this to the offense in 2017. Malzahn's offense has generated plays of 15-yards or more in the passing game 19.8 percent of the time, while Lindsey's pass-offense is currently hitting at 18.8 percent. During this past season, Auburn checked in at 17.6 percent, and the Sun Devils of Arizona State was slightly better at 17.8 percent. In terms of "quantity", Arizona State appeared to be better but not so when it came to "quality". Regarding efficiency, Auburn was No. 54 nationally during 2016, while Arizona State was No. 73 as both teams struggled with injuries at the quarterback position. Despite the injuries, Auburn's 2016 offense did improve overall compared to 2015, which means the offense was not utterly incompetent. Stabilization at the quarterback position should make a significant difference in 2017 regardless of the changes made schematically. If Auburn can remain healthy, I expect the offense to continue to improve and to perform more consistently. Improvement could take place simply because of better quarterback play. Just as the inconsistencies in offense during 2016 was primarily related to injuries, recovery in 2017 doesn't mean all the right moves were made. Even during the record-breaking years on offense witnessed in 2010, 2013 and 2014, Auburn struggled inside the red zone and was extremely predictable on first down. During the past two seasons, Auburn has run the football 79% of the time inside the red zone. During the past two seasons, Chip Lindsey has run the football 63% of the time inside the red zone. Two statistical categories to watch for in 2017 is the percentage of pass plays called on first down and the percentage of pass attempts on third down. During the seven seasons of Malzahn offense at Auburn, the Tigers have passed the ball only 21 percent of the time on first down and 31 percent of their pass attempts have occurred on third down. During Chip Lindsey's three seasons as a collegiate OC, his offense has passed the ball 40 percent of the time on first down and only 25 percent of their overall passes have come on third down. Lindsey's offense passes the ball when they want to more so than when they have to. This is the exact opposite of Malzahn's offense, where the quarterback is placed into way too many obvious passing situations. During the past two seasons, over 33 percent of Auburn's pass attempts have come on third down. With the array of returning talent, the addition of a highly-touted quarterback and the accumulation of some new tweaks in the passing game under Chip Lindsey should make the offense dynamic again. A more productive offense will be cause for celebration, but Coach Malzahn must be willing to adjust his offensive schemes for the offense to reach its full potential. Scoring 35 points per game would be great but not if the potential was there to average 40. The opportunity is there for Auburn to reach its offensive ceiling but only if the man in charge permits it to happen.
  8. During the 2015 season, Auburn's opponent scored on 41 percent of their possessions at least 75-yards away from the Auburn end zone. This season the defense improved to 21.8 percent the best percentage by an Auburn defense since 2008. The Auburn defense forced an average of 6.8 long fields per game in 2015, which increased to 8.6 during 2016. Not only did Auburn force more long field possessions, they cut scoring down by nearly 50 percent from the season before. Auburn allowed 22 touchdowns this season, which was the fewest allowed in 13 games since the 2007 season, when Auburn surrendered 21. Auburn's defense allowed 4.82 yards per play on 1st down, their best average since the 2003 season. Last season the Auburn offense averaged a play of 30-yards or more every 40.5 snaps. The Tigers improved to 1 every 28.3 plays during 2016. Prior to White and Pettway's injury, it was 1 every 24.8 snaps. Malzahn and Auburn are 28-4, when leading at halftime. Pat Dye's average margin of defeat was 10.4 points. Terry Bowden was 12.4 points and Tommy Tuberville was 13.4. Gene Chizik's average margin of defeat was 20.9 points and Gus Malzahn is currently 11.4 points. The 2016 Auburn defense allowed a TD every 45.1 plays against conference opponents. This was the best ratio by an Auburn defense since 1988. Utilizing an efficiency formula based on yards per game, yards per play, TD ratio, impact plays, 1st down average and strength of schedule, the 2016 Auburn offense had the 6th best rating over the past 25 years of Auburn football. Auburn's defense allowed a TD every 42.2 plays, the highest ratio by an Auburn defense since the 2005 season. Auburn scored only 7 offensive TD's outside the red zone during the 2015 season. This year the Tigers scored 15. Auburn's 2016 offense netted at least 40-yards during 47.4 percent of their possessions. This was the second highest percentage over the past 25 years of Auburn football. Only the 2010 team had a higher percentage. Only 14.1 percent of the possessions defended by the 2016 Auburn defense resulted in a TD. This was the best percentage by an Auburn defense since 2005. The 2016 Auburn run-offense rated out as the 6th best run-offense at Auburn over the past 64 years. This is based on yards per game, yards per attempt and TD ratio. Auburn's 2016 defense allowed only 2 rushing TD's in conference play. This is the fewest rushing TD's allowed during the last 50 years of Auburn football. Based on yards per game, yards per rush and TD ratio, the 2016 Auburn run-offense was the 10th best over the past 50 years of Auburn football in conference play. Auburn's 2016 run-offense was No. 7 nationally generating run plays of 10-yards or more. Prior to being injured, Sean White had a passer rating of 158.9. This would have placed him No. 10 nationally if he had maintained his rating. The 2016 Auburn defense held their opponent to 43.4 percent below their scoring average. This is the best percentage by an Auburn defense since 2004. Prior to the injuries of Sean White and Kamryn Pettway, the Auburn offense was gaining 25 percent more yardage than the opponent normally allowed and was scoring 35 percent more than the opponent allowed. For the season, Auburn finished at 12 percent more in yardage and 19 percent more in points scored. Kamryn Pettway's 122.4 yards per game was the 6th best performance by an Auburn RB (leading rusher). Daniel Carlson set a school record with 28 field goals in one season. During his career, Carlson has connected on 45 of 49 FG's under 40-yards. Auburn's 54 run plays of 15-yards or more was the 3rd most by an Auburn run-offense during the past 30 years. War Eagle!
  9. For the most part, Auburn under Gus Malzahn has been about imposing their will to run the football to be successful on offensive. During his tenure at Auburn, the Tigers have rewritten many offensive records, primarily with the success of the running game. Though there have been very successful moments throwing the football, the passing game has been built off the play-action and Auburn's ability to run downhill. The following data is based on the seasons Gus Malzahn has been at Auburn as offensive coordinator and head coach (2009-2011 & 2013-2016). Auburn's offense under Gus Malzahn is 10-14 during games the Tigers are held under 170-yards rushing. During those 24 games, Auburn had a pass-rating of 126.3, while averaging just 20.9 points per game. During games, Auburn rushed for at least 200-yards under Gus Malzahn, the Tigers compiled a 51-12 record. During those 63 games, Auburn compiled a pass rating of 154.9, while averaging 38.7 points per game. Auburn's offense under Gus Malzahn is 46-10 when the Tigers average more than 4.5 yards per rush on first down during a game. The Tigers are 19-18 when held to 4.5 yards or less. Take away Auburn's ability to impose their will by running the football, and you increase your chances for victory against the Tigers. Auburn under Malzahn's offense is 50-13 in games with 25 pass attempts or less and 15-15 when they attempt at least 26 passes. Auburn under Malzahn's offense is 47-10 during games with at least 45 rush attempts and 10-13 during games with under 40 rush attempts. Auburn under Malzahn's offense is 39-1 when they run the ball more than 68 percent of the time during a game and 14-13 when they run less than 60 percent. During the Malzahn offensive era at Auburn, the Tigers have averaged 7.1 games per season, held under 200-yards passing. This is second worst in the SEC, with Vanderbilt averaging 8.3 per season. Auburn's 20.9 points per game when held under 170-yards rushing is ninth best in the SEC under Malzahn's offense. Only LSU with 23.2 attempts per game, has thrown fewer pass attempts per game than Auburn under Gus Malzahn (23.3). During the Malzahn offensive era at Auburn, the Tigers are 10th in the SEC when it comes to games with at least two touchdown passes. The average pass-rating during 2009-2011 and 2013-2016 is 134.6 in the SEC. Auburn reached a rating of at least 135 during 58.1 percent of their games under Malzahn's offense. This ranks No. 4 in the conference behind Alabama, Arkansas, and Georgia. The average passing yardage during a game during 2009-2011 and 2013-2016 in the SEC is 219.6 yards. Auburn reached at least 220-yards passing during 34.4 percent of their games, which ranks 12th among the 14 SEC teams The average yards per pass attempt from 2009-2011 and 2013-2016 in the SEC is 7.50 yards. Auburn reached this mark in 59.1 percent of their games, 5th best among the 14 SEC teams. Auburn's overall pass-rating during this period is 145.2, third best in the SEC. In conference games only, Auburn under Malzahn's offense has a pass-rating of 135.8, fourth best among the 14 SEC teams. Alabama, Arkansas, and Texas A&M were rated higher than the Tigers. Making Adjustments during the game: Auburn's offense under Malzahn is 15-17 during games Auburn scores only once during their first 4 possessions and 4-10 during the past three seasons. Auburn's offense under Malzahn is 10-19 in games against Power-5 competition when held to 13 points or less by halftime. Auburn's average scoring output during those 29 games is 18.4 PPG. Auburn is 6-12 in SEC games when held to under 7 points during the first quarter and 1-7 in conference games when held to zero points during the first quarter. Under Malzahn, Auburn is 2-11 when trailing by 10 or more points at halftime and 6-16, when trailing by at least 6 points. Having a consistent performer at the quarterback position would mask many of Auburn's offensive issues the past two seasons but additional changes are needed for the offense to reach its full potential. Auburn has attempted more passes on third down than first down under Gus Malzahn, and their average ranking in TD percentage inside the red zone is No. 44 nationally. Injuries was a primary issue on the offensive side of the football this season but being predictable can hinder any offense. Making the most of your opportunities is essential. Auburn under Malzahn is 7-7 in games with less than 60 offensive snaps. This is tied for 7th best among the 14 SEC teams. It will be interesting to see if any changes are made regarding staff, personnel, and schemes for the 2017 season.
  10. From 1960-2015, the SEC produced an average of 3.6 teams with a win percentage of at least .700. The 2016 season will mark the first time the SEC produced only 1 team with a win percentage of at least .700 (Alabama). Since the league expanded to 12 teams in 1992, the fewest number of teams with a win pct of .700 was two. It happened in 2000, 2002 and 2009. From 1960-2016, there have been eleven seasons with at least 5 teams with a win pct of .700 or better. There have been only two seasons with six teams, which is the most. It happened in 1971 and 2012.
  11. From 2012-2016 (SEC), the average pass rating during a conference game is 128.4. Here is the frequency of games with a pass rating of at least 129 or better during the past five seasons. Team Num Tot Pct W L Pct Alabama 32 44 72.7% 30 2 0.938 Texas A&M 25 40 62.5% 17 8 0.680 Georgia 24 41 58.5% 17 7 0.708 Miss State 22 40 55.0% 16 6 0.727 Ole Miss 21 40 52.5% 15 6 0.714 South Carolina 21 40 52.5% 15 6 0.714 Arkansas 20 40 50.0% 10 10 0.500 Auburn 20 41 48.8% 17 3 0.850 Tennessee 19 40 47.5% 12 7 0.632 Florida 15 40 37.5% 13 2 0.867 LSU 15 40 37.5% 11 4 0.733 Missouri 14 42 33.3% 10 4 0.714 Vanderbilt 13 40 32.5% 7 6 0.538 Kentucky 11 40 27.5% 5 6 0.455 Totals 272 568 47.9% 195 77 0.717 Alabama is No. 1 with a pass rating of 129 or better in nearly 73% of their conference games. It happens nearly 48% of the time during the past five seasons for the the teams combined. When the goal is reached, the average win percentage is 71.7 percent. Auburn is No. 8 over the past 5 years but should be in the top-5 with the talent level recruited. When Auburn did reach the goal, the Tigers won 85 percent of their conference games.
  12. From 2000-2016, the average pass-efficiency rating is 130.8. During this time period, teams that reached a QB rating of at least 131 during a game, won 83% of their games. Here is a breakdown by season, sorted by overall QB Rating in the SEC. Rnk Year Rating Pct 1 2013 142.2 59.4 2 2010 141.5 62.4 3 2012 139.5 56.4 4 2014 135.9 52.7 5 2001 133.8 50.0 6 2006 133.6 52.2 7 2016 132.5 51.7 8 2015 131.1 48.6 9 2009 130.3 44.5 10 2011 128.6 45.2 11 2003 128.5 44.8 12 2004 128.4 44.3 13 2007 127.0 45.8 14 2005 123.8 40.0 15 2002 122.5 42.8 16 2008 120.7 40.0 17 2000 118.7 33.6 The 2016 season ranks 7th during the past 17 seasons with an overall rating of 132.5. The average rating of 131 was reached in 51.7% of the games this season. The best season was 2010, when the average rating of 131 was reached in over 62% of the games played that year. From 2012-2016, here are the total number of games with a pass rating of 131 or better: Alabama ............ 50 Texas A&M ........ 45 Georgia ............. 42 Miss State ......... 39 Ole Miss ............ 38 Auburn .............. 37 S. Carolina ......... 36 Arkansas ............ 34 Tennessee ......... 32 LSU ................... 29 Missouri ............. 27 Florida ............... 25 Kentucky ........... 22 Vanderbilt .......... 22
  13. If it were agenda driven, why would I mention positive aspects of his coaching career? Since 2009, I have consistently publicized his successes far more than his struggles. His offenses at Auburn during his tenure is the greatest run in the history of the program. It doesn't mean there have been no shortcomings. When his offense is on, it looks great but when it struggles early, it consistently doesn't end well. I never advocated for him to be terminated. I clearly stated WE want him to succeed and it would be in the best interest of the program for this to happen. He has some challenging decisions to make moving forward. I hope he makes them. My agenda is this.... he needs to make some critical changes. I believe he CAN make them but not sure if he WILL unless his hand is forced.
  14. All coaches at this level have some level of ego. Other than being over sensitive over two words, what did I write that wasn't true? I gave the man his due when it comes to the good things he has accomplished and stressed he needs to remain as head coach. Here is a suggestion for you... If you don't like my comments, don't waste your time reading them.
  15. I did not suggest running an entirely knew offense. I suggested someone that utilize his base offense and evolve the passing game.