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meh130

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  1. They go from BMOC at high school to Rodney Garner's tough love approach. Some do not adapt well.
  2. Chris Brown, in his book "Smart Football", talks about the origin of this hybrid, pattern-matching man-zone coverage. Many leading Power 5 schools use defensive secondary schemes like this today. But Saban and Smart are two of the best at it. It requires very talented cornerbacks, who have to make the decision to either stay with their outside WR in man coverage, or let the WR go past and take up their zone responsibility. These hybrid man-zone coverages are why you have seen an RB on a wheel route out of the backfield be wide open and gain 20 yards, if the #1 WR takes the top o
  3. Honestly, Ellis' system was totally scheme based. It just was not going to work in the SEC given the talent level. Ellis' 4-2 was based on a very traditional 4-3 type front, usually with both DEs playing hand-down and rushing the passer. The front was not fancy. It also heavily depended on man coverage. It was designed for defending no-huddle Air Raid offenses. But against 4 and 5 star Power 5 offensive linemen, and 4 and 5 star Power 5 wide receivers, talent matters a lot more than scheme. The most success we had was when both Dee Ford and Carl Lawson were in the game, just because
  4. Everyone tends to talk about Duke's ability as a wide receiver. However, to me he stood out because of his physical size. His current NFL measurements are 6'-3", 225lbs. Too bad he had attitude problems.
  5. Good point. When that happened I was upset because I knew we had scored too soon.
  6. I don't know if this has been posted elsewhere, but this is a great op-ed by Gene Chizik on college footbal: Gene Chizik: Why we love college football
  7. That may have been my favorite play last season. It is up there with Worm's decapitation of Xavier McKinney in the Iron Bowl. Derrick Brown could have started at cornerback with a D-2 team, he was that athletic.
  8. We sort of did this against Ole Miss, where we lined up in a non-standard 10-man defense with Big Kat running off the field, then ran Derrick Brown on at the last possible second on the "Speed Smash", the defensive version of the "Speed Sweep", where the 320lb DT runs in a full speed and crushes the RB catching the pass in the flat.
  9. What in the actual Hell? "Loophole" KMFA. That pretty much ends any "illegal substitution" penalties on the defensive side. Is the offense now allowed to do the same? At one time, the offense was allowed to huddle 12 people back when they used to use players to "run in" the play. They eliminated that, because the defense could not anticipate which player would run off at the last second. I think it was when they made that offensive "illegal substitution" change when they also made the change for the defense. Anyway, this is crazy, because all we did was a formation line up
  10. A few more thoughts. 109 yards = 100 meters. But Chris Davis did not run a straight line. He easily ran an extra 15 yards, probably more. The time from catching the ball to crossing the goal line was about 14 seconds. Usain Bolt's 100 meter dash world record is 9.58 seconds. So Davis ran about 115 meters in full pads, starting by fielding ball (not in track starter blocks), weaving and dodging, tip-toeing down the sideline, etc., in 14 seconds. Davis' NFL Combine 40 yard dash time was 4.54 seconds (no pads, out of a starting stance). To cover 125 yards in 14 secon
  11. It was Gabe Wright that pancaked the kicker. I missed that it was Crazy Train that was being played over the loudspeakers. Don't forget A.J. McCarron immediately jogging off the field instead of shaking hands with the players.
  12. We did a little Outside Zone Read/Inverted Veer/Power Read with Nick Marshall, but not much. We also did a little Inside Zone Read with Cam Newton, but not much. I really think it comes down to personnel. With a small fast RB like Omac and big bruising QB like Cam, the RB speed sweep and the QB power complement each other well. With a powerful inside running threat like Tre Mason and a fast, agile QB like Marshall, the Inside Zone Read is playing to strengths. But at the same time you do not want to be predictable. The "Toss Read" is a variation of the Power Read that is be
  13. As a Dolphins fan, I like the pick, but I hope Tua can stay healthy.
  14. Really interesting to read these posts. Our OL over the last few years has not lacked for recruited talent. We have recruited plenty of 4-stars, and even a 5-star. It appears to have lacked from development. When junior and senior 4-star OLs can't win a starting position against underclassmen, graduate transfer 0-stars and 2-stars, and converted defensive ends, either they were not 4-stars to begin with, or they were not developed. Also, anyone looking at our OL over the last two years and one can see the lack of push during running plays. Our pass protection was rated pretty good this y
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