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walker77

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About walker77

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  1. 99% of the time E has some really good posts... worth reading nearly every time... Others who seem to have a critical spirit and want to argue/criticize all the time on here = not so much... greatly detract instead of add to the board... Just saying
  2. Was he on the last state championship team AHS had? If so, I watched him in the state championship game that year and the middle linebacker was dominant... love to get that caliber of LB... Also, back in the 70's big Kenneth Hutchinson was the real deal as well @ LB...
  3. Can you provide a reference? I don't doubt that the two points you made are correct...I just doubt it was that binary as the driving factor in the decline. I assume your point is wide acceptance of homosexuality is part of a much broader pattern of moral decay? correct...
  4. Historical pattern: 27-great empires have risen and fallen over the course of time, and a common factor in each was a strong heterosexual/marriage/family foundation at the initial stages of their formation, and a wide spread acceptance of homosexuality as the empire was disintegrating... However, what we are seeing today differs significantly from this pattern: No other nations have ever allowed/accepted same sex marriage as accepted on the same level as heterosexual marriage... must less allowed it's participants to become a special, entitled class... Nations stand or fall only on the basis of the strenght of the families in that nation...
  5. Pattern in countries with nationalized health care: common people stuck with sub-par health care in the system... and the wealthy receive top notch care in private clinics which are generally set up and staffed by the top doctors in the nation... Only ones able to afford the clinics are the wealthy... forget about the peasants... And our congressmen know this if they have done any traveling at all to other countries... = they are going to get top notch care anyway!
  6. walker77

    Is our athletic department "too religious"?

    Everybody has slanted interpretations... based on their worldview... That is part of what is driving this thread. Now as far as separating our religion from our job, shopping, coaching, or playing rec league ball... Regardless of what one thinks, each of our religious belief systems will be evident and will be seen by others... Not necessarily evangelism, but rather the testimony of what we believe will be evident in our demeanor, attitudes, integrity, etc., will be seen by others. This is why we need coaches with excellent coaching skills AND a strong Christian character in my opinion.
  7. walker77

    Is our athletic department "too religious"?

    ^^^^^^^Over 40 years old white males^^^^^^^
  8. walker77

    Is our athletic department "too religious"?

    This would be so much easier of an OP to address for most if we were dealing with whether the coach should be allowed to influence the players to eat a tropical blizzard, rather than a banana split. But you bring Christ into the equation and serious, count the cost, decisions have to be made. He said Himself that He was bringing division... knowing many would reject Him... And I believe what He brings, even to athletic competition, beats the alternatives... and this will be expresed not only in the players, but coaches as well...
  9. walker77

    Is our athletic department "too religious"?

    Matthew 6:1-6 The KJV is a select group of writings chosen by a bunch more guys that generally reinforced their position of power over the masses. There's plenty more out there that tells a different story. So read what pleases you and your faith (using the collective 'you' here) but respect the choice of others . A zealot will not respect this personal and private choice is the point. This comment about the King James Bible shows an abysmal lack of knowledge about the word of God, and is totally without any merit concerning reinforced position of power over the masses. Recommend you more background study before making such groundless remarks. Nah. KJV is the the most accepted English translation of a select collection of stories which positioned the "ins" to remain in power. The words are by men, interpreted by men and transcribed by men. Since man is flawed, can anyone say this is the word of God? That's the power over the then uneducated masses. Not very groundless, just another objective view. Interesting, Post Modernist position presented here... Which brings up another perspective of just how far a teacher/coach can "legally" go with his religion... We have all heard a lot about the constitution protecting our freedom of religion... and by definition Christianity Is Not a personal, meditate on your navel, keep it to oneself, religious discipline, but rather an engagement and an impacting of the culture with the gospel of the kingdom, as defined by the Bible... So where did the current mantra, " People have a right to worship", come from? By definition this limits religion to the individual's religious expression primarily to church services, only. This is a serious redefinition of Christianity. Is it right to muzzle anyone's free speech and freedom of religion just because they are a coach?
  10. walker77

    Is our athletic department "too religious"?

    As a counter perspective to this OP, I'd like to add my and my wife's experience with hires at AU during the 70's (granted they were academic, but still the scenario is valid in comparison). These are true examples... 1. English Composition Class - I had an alcoholic feminist as an instructor. After 3 weeks of class when I had a high B average she told me that I didn't write well enough to get higher than a C in her class. From that point on, I recieved C's & D's on my papers, even as the girls aced everything. I had my wife (a straight A english student) write a paper for me, with same result. Note: her atheistic anti-male religion was obvious. 2. Sociology Class - My professor was blatantly atheistic and taunted Christians in the class. I was probably an agnostic at the time, but even then his slanted indoctrination was obvious. 3. Geography Class - My wife's teacher lectured exclusively on Marxism daily, never on Geography. He gave the answers out the day before a test so everybody made good grades. Again, a blatant none-christian indoctrination. The Counter Question Is: Is there a place for this type of hire as a coach (or as a teacher) at Auburn University???
  11. walker77

    Is our athletic department "too religious"?

    So here is the OP delimma, which you authored... In your opinion, what is the "acceptable" level of a coach/AD walking out their faith? Where is the standard? Who decides?... Al.com, Obama, congress, a nation-wide vote,???... ... this is not a relative issue, but is based upon absolute none changing standards as set and defined in the Bible... not open to being defined by personable preference... not based on a societal evolutionary sliding scale of morality or conduct... And we are all probably at least a little intimidated by what this truth requires of each of us individually... And yes, there is a great need for true Christian influence in every area of the market place today. Look, I know a bit about the Bible. I teach New Testament in a denominational seminary (full professor, six academic books, national and international leadership responsibilities) and serve a local church p/t to boot. Doesn't mean my opinions are correct, but I'm informed. The Bible doesn't say a thing about how a football coach should handle his job, how to do public relations, or even about how Christians should manage public roles. No such set of "standards" exists. You may interpret the Bible to address those contexts, and people should, but let's not pretend there's a "how-to" for coaches in there. I've taught in secular contexts too. Students knew I was a Christian, as being a Christian informs my opinions. They could come to me for vocational or spiritual guidance, and some did. However, I did not -- I could not, ethically -- use that job as a platform to promote my faith. I could demonstrate that a reasonable, gracious person could excel as a scholar and a teacher. I could serve religious communities when invited. But I could not use my position, the stuff the state of South Carolina was paying me to do, to evangelize. Absolutely not. My concern with the athletic department involves whether there's a culture that marginalizes unbelieving players and whether there's a bit of a good ole boy network that influences coaching decisions. I also believe it's wrong to project the image of a "Christian" program in a state university. Finally, there's the "cheesiness." There's no reason to tell the world you fired a coach after praying with him about it. And mercy, the "Satan" FB message last year was some moldy cheese. As open as I am about my faith, I don't do "Christian" bumper stickers and the like. You know why? Because I make driving errors like everyone else, and I don't want my error to look like selfishness -- and then have someone associate it with my faith. As a point of clarification: Everyone is religious & has a personal theology... atheists=no god... christians = God ... agnostics = who knows... cosmic humanists = everything is god... each of these is a theological position in life. As an agnostic, I feel compelled to point out you are expanding the meaning of religion and theology to include any personal philosophy, which can be secular (as you indicate above with "who knows?"). Some of us didn't get the "God gene". Whether we realize it or not, whatever theology one adheres to, it leads directly to our ethical/moral system of thought, the psychology approach we use, etc... all based on Genesis 1:1 and how one interprets it... again, either God/no god/who knows/ everything god created creation... The concept of morality doesn't necessarily emerge from theological belief. The scientific field of sociobiology makes a strong case for the natural evolution of morality. and our culture is full of the failures of taking God out of the equation... As a result, I am much more comfortable with a man coaching a team who instills the christian ethical system of honesty & integrity, personal sacrifice for a cause greater than selfish desires, putting the team ahead of self, accepting personal responsibity for actions (both good & bad), exercising personal discipline, etc., Nothing wrong with any of that, but once you start proselytizing the specific sectarian belief systems of Christianity you have really crossed the line into the inappropriate. Christianity is not the only way to promote honesty, integrity, personal sacrifice, personal responsibility, etc. And a football team is not the place to proselytize religious dogma, at least if you are in a position of leadership. As an example, I am on the school board of a local high school which just won the state football championship in 2012. The coach is a man of strong christian integrity who held everyone to a high standard on the staff and on the team, including no cursing in practices and games. Yes, there was prayer and there was discipline as well. He also coached my son a few years ago and instilled character that supplimented what his mother and I had taught. This same coach has coached 2 national championship basketball teams @ our school over the years as well. Was the prayer led by the coach or did the kids spontaneously do it on their own? Was it a sectarian prayer (to Jesus)? Were there any Unitarian, Jewish, Islamic, or Hindu kids on the team? What about kids who were being raised by agnostics and wanted their boy to reach his own conclusions without a coercive atmosphere? As a side note, I have coached, been a high school principal and been the commissioner of an athletic conference ... and have observed first-hand the best and the worst of what I am presenting here... I know that a lot of you have already put me in the "anti-Christian" category, which I can assure you is not true. Christianity happens to be my heritage. I have the utmost respect for Christianity (if not necessarily Christians). I see this first as a question of power and secondly, as a question of basic respect and courtesy. Anyone in a position of power who proselytizes any religious dogma to people he has authority over is abusing that power and trust. It is also disrespectful of alternative points of view. Please don't misconstrue my intent here, because I certainly respect your right to your religious freedom and everyone else's for that matter... My point is that everyone is religious... even agnostics to a degree = which is the spring board from which one orders their life AND how they relate to others... and if an agnostic coaches he will talk/live/instill his dogma in his players... No one will ever force anyone else to pray... not going to happen... and I didn't say a word about forced evangelism in this context, either... In my opinion, a man or woman with a true growing relationship with Christ possesses the "goods" to help mold youth, especially single parent kids, in a profound way. I gave our coach as an example of those proven as a winner in athletic competition as well... which is really what this OP is about...
  12. walker77

    Is our athletic department "too religious"?

    Actually Auburn was founded to prepare preachers to minister the gospel = the very foundation AU is built upon.
  13. walker77

    Is our athletic department "too religious"?

    So here is the OP delimma, which you authored... In your opinion, what is the "acceptable" level of a coach/AD walking out their faith? Where is the standard? Who decides?... Al.com, Obama, congress, a nation-wide vote,???... ... this is not a relative issue, but is based upon absolute none changing standards as set and defined in the Bible... not open to being defined by personable preference... not based on a societal evolutionary sliding scale of morality or conduct... And we are all probably at least a little intimidated by what this truth requires of each of us individually... And yes, there is a great need for true Christian influence in every area of the market place today. Look, I know a bit about the Bible. I teach New Testament in a denominational seminary (full professor, six academic books, national and international leadership responsibilities) and serve a local church p/t to boot. Doesn't mean my opinions are correct, but I'm informed. The Bible doesn't say a thing about how a football coach should handle his job, how to do public relations, or even about how Christians should manage public roles. No such set of "standards" exists. You may interpret the Bible to address those contexts, and people should, but let's not pretend there's a "how-to" for coaches in there. I've taught in secular contexts too. Students knew I was a Christian, as being a Christian informs my opinions. They could come to me for vocational or spiritual guidance, and some did. However, I did not -- I could not, ethically -- use that job as a platform to promote my faith. I could demonstrate that a reasonable, gracious person could excel as a scholar and a teacher. I could serve religious communities when invited. But I could not use my position, the stuff the state of South Carolina was paying me to do, to evangelize. Absolutely not. My concern with the athletic department involves whether there's a culture that marginalizes unbelieving players and whether there's a bit of a good ole boy network that influences coaching decisions. I also believe it's wrong to project the image of a "Christian" program in a state university. Finally, there's the "cheesiness." There's no reason to tell the world you fired a coach after praying with him about it. And mercy, the "Satan" FB message last year was some moldy cheese. As open as I am about my faith, I don't do "Christian" bumper stickers and the like. You know why? Because I make driving errors like everyone else, and I don't want my error to look like selfishness -- and then have someone associate it with my faith. As a point of clarification: Everyone is religious & has a personal theology... atheists=no god... christians = God ... agnostics = who knows... cosmic humanists = everything is god... each of these is a theological position in life. Whether we realize it or not, whatever theology one adheres to, it leads directly to our ethical/moral system of thought, the psychology approach we use, etc... all based on Genesis 1:1 and how one interprets it... again, either God/no god/who knows/ everything god created creation... and our culture is full of the failures of taking God out of the equation... As a result, I am much more comfortable with a man coaching a team who instills the christian ethical system of honesty & integrity, personal sacrifice for a cause greater than selfish desires, putting the team ahead of self, accepting personal responsibity for actions (both good & bad), exercising personal discipline, etc., As an example, I am on the school board of a local high school which just won the state football championship in 2012. The coach is a man of strong christian integrity who held everyone to a high standard on the staff and on the team, including no cursing in practices and games. Yes, there was prayer and there was discipline as well. He also coached my son a few years ago and instilled character that supplimented what his mother and I had taught. This same coach has coached 2 national championship basketball teams @ our school over the years as well.
  14. walker77

    Is our athletic department "too religious"?

    So here is the OP delimma, which you authored... In your opinion, what is the "acceptable" level of a coach/AD walking out their faith? Where is the standard? Who decides?... Al.com, Obama, congress, a nation-wide vote,???... ... this is not a relative issue, but is based upon absolute none changing standards as set and defined in the Bible... not open to being defined by personable preference... not based on a societal evolutionary sliding scale of morality or conduct... And we are all probably at least a little intimidated by what this truth requires of each of us individually... And yes, there is a great need for true Christian influence in every area of the market place today.
  15. walker77

    Mike McNeil pleads guilty

    what is sad ... if the defense attorneys actually orchestrated these storys, then they may have caused their clients more harm than good. I would love for the guys to state the articles were the attorney's idea ... that would be fun. I would include Selena Roberts in this coordinated attack on AU. She and Ben Hand, MM's attorney, were at AU the same time and makes me think they have a history of some sort. Not true... but it is more fun to draw up conspiracies than to look at it objectively.