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oracle79

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Everything posted by oracle79

  1. Glad I'm not a teenager in today's society.
  2. Just out of curiosity, which ones?😉
  3. I'd rather wear garlic around my neck - that might help with social distancing. 🤢
  4. Yeah, but did they study anyone other than Lou Holtz and Sylvester the cat?
  5. Claim every season without a loss plus 1983. That would make 10. Nice round number.
  6. I think the rule is if you have a game scheduled and you don't show up, you forfeit. I can see California colleges all going 0-12.
  7. To be fair, that was a tougher generation and didn't have the luxury of many of the vaccinations we have today. I had an uncle with polio and he used crutches to get around, but it didn't slow him down much. Hard to comprehend that lifestyle today.
  8. I'll bet he wasn't hiding in his house during the 57 and 68 flu pandemics either was he?
  9. Depends mainly on the age group you're examining. Article link if interested (it's a conservative publication so you've been warned). The charts are from Netherlands because according to the article, the CDC hasn't published anything like it for the U.S. https://www.conservativereview.com/news/horowitz-one-chart-exposes-lie-behind-universal-lockdowns/
  10. I imagine the numbers are .002 or .2%. Percents can fool you in math. Then were looking at over 600,000 deaths which is obviously not accurate. The final statistics of this "pandemic" will be eye opening if they ever come out without bias.
  11. Move him along before tenure.
  12. We've had a guy come from Division II and start for us at center, and a right tackle from the worst Division I program in football. It's not necessarily how good this guy is, it's more about what we have now talent wise and experience wise. If it's an upgrade, it is good.
  13. Personal experience - the master teacher.
  14. Upset over this? Really? People have lost and are losing their minds.
  15. You think that is bad, wait until you see the financial impact of shutting things down. We'll see eventually. Everything now is based on speculation from incomplete data. I'll say again, be prudent, not hysterical.
  16. Because no one knows the contagion rate (or even specifically how it's transmitted), the death rate, if it will dissipate in warm weather as the flu does, if herd immunity will occur over time, when a vaccine will be available, if antiviral drugs currently are effective, if effective antiviral drugs will be quickly developed, etc. It's all speculation based on the minuscule amount of evidence we have and you can't trust about 90% of what the Chinese report. Chill with the panic mindset and take prudent precautions. It will be interesting to see if these extreme measures end up harming more people (by crushing the economy, reducing medical care for other conditions, etc) than it ends up saving from the Chinese Wuhan corona virus aka CoVid 19. Long read, but I'll link it anyway for the curious and those looking for an objective look at data. https://www.statnews.com/2020/03/17/a-fiasco-in-the-making-as-the-coronavirus-pandemic-takes-hold-we-are-making-decisions-without-reliable-data/
  17. Has anyone else been having a dream about an old black woman living in Nebraska? I'm thinking of heading that way.
  18. Prudence and following CDC guidelines/recommendations is smart. Panic is not. I'd do the same thing if I were you. I'm under 65 with no underlying health conditions. I wash my hands/cart handles, etc., don't touch my face, and don't touch other people. Other than that, business as usual.
  19. Not since the end of Desert Storm.
  20. Get a grip. https://bigthink.com/strange-maps/coronavirus-spread-video-graph By Day 60, it's the swine flu cases that have exploded, to more than 60,000 people ill and 296 people killed—surpassing Ebola (183), if not SARS (513). The swine flu numbers keep growing exponentially: by Day 80, they've passed 362,000 cases (and 1,770 deaths), far surpassing any of the other diseases. Day 100: swine flu cases are approaching 1 million, deaths have surpassed 5,000. That's far more than all the other diseases combined—they have merged into a single line at the bottom of the graph. By Day 150, swine flu hit 5.2 million patients, with 25,400 people killed. By the time it was declared over, a year later, the outbreak would eventually have infected more than 60 million people and claimed the lives of almost 300,000. Swine flu was caused by the H1N1 virus, which also caused the Spanish flu. That outbreak, in 1918/19, infected about 500 million people, or 1 in 3 people alive at that time. It killed at least 50 million people. It was the combination of extreme infectiousness and high fatality that made the Spanish flu such a global, lethal pandemic. None of the other infectious diseases comes close to that combination. The swine flu, although more infectious than other diseases, was less infectious than the Spanish flu, and also less deadly (0.5%). Unlike COVID-19 or its fellow coronaviruses SARS and MERS, Ebola is not spread via airborne particles, but via contact with infected blood. That makes it hard to spread. Ironically, it may also be too lethal (39.6%) to spread very far. And COVID-19 itself, while relatively lethal (2.4%), is well below the deadliness of the Spanish flu, and does not seem to spread with the same ease.