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TigerHorn

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About TigerHorn

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    Trainer

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    Automotive industry, startup companies, restaurant industry, AU and Texas
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    ATX
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    Male

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  1. Dang, sorry to see that. Prayers sent.
  2. Talk radio exists because the voices of conservatives were silenced on TV. Fox News came along after talk radio had traction in 1996. CNN had already swung left, or Fox wouldn't even have gotten off the ground. Even on radio, NPR was always omnipresent across America and still is. There is no way you can say NPR is even close to neutral on most subjects. On the internet, for every conservative outlet, there are a dozen left wing outlets and even pervasive bias in sites that used to be neutral, like Snopes. I generally avoid listening to Limbaugh, haven't in over a decade in fact live, but one of the things he absolutely crushes is collecting snippets from various media personalities showing them saying exactly the same things using exactly the same words. I study this sort of thing, and I don't see that exact word for word repetition of comments on the right, while it is clearcut and undeniable on the left. The people of the right say similar things, those on the left say exactly the same thing. As my Japanese colleagues are fond of saying, "Genchi genbutsu" - go and see for yourself. Well crap, I just realized this was the political forum and not the same post on All Things Considered. I'll leave the reply up, but I won't be back.
  3. Has anyone seen the column written by Stanford's sports editor on it? They watched it on their stadium jumbotron as the Cardinal were about to start their own game. Then there was that post by a Wisconsin fan who had set out to watch all of the great CFB rivalries, and just happened to pick that Iron Bowl to go to. Would love to read both of those again. They used to be on the classics forum at TOS, but that forum died when it merged.
  4. Now Golf, reflect on how all those decades of idolizing Oddball have influenced you!
  5. If you repeat what you hear on media without realizing it, this is why, and why you should always get your news from more than one source, even if you don't like it. I'm just going to leave it here, you folks can do with it as you will, but I won't reply. I will tell you that from my 30 years of watching both sides, the Left is by far the worst for blindly repeating talking points. I've spent a good bit of my career working to influence people, and on the other side, sifting through business plans and technical documents to sort out what the author was trying to influence me to think vs what the facts actually are. I've always been appalled at the lack of understanding among the general populace about how influence works, and how effective it is. This applies equally to science, marketing consumer goods, and yes, politics and the media, the latter two greatly magnified by today's echo chambers in social media. This is hard to get people to understand, but I just came across the simplest, most powerful example I have ever seen of how basic influence techniques work, and as a bonus its fun to watch - if you have Netflix! On Netflix, look up season 3, episode 1 of Magic for Humans, and fast forward to the 15:30 mark. Some millennials who are themselves influencers and think they are above it all get a harsh, yet hilarious, lesson in just how human they are....after you watch this, think of the things you expose you and your families to, and consider how they are being influenced. I hope you take some time to reflect on that. https://www.netflix.com/title/80190510
  6. I've spent a good bit of my career working to influence people, and on the other side, sifting through business plans and technical documents to sort out what the author was trying to influence me to think vs what the facts actually are. I've always been appalled at the lack of understanding among the general populace about how influence works, and how effective it is. This applies equally to science, marketing consumer goods, and yes, politics and the media, the latter two greatly magnified by today's echo chambers in social media. This is hard to get people to understand, but I just came across the simplest, most powerful example I have ever seen of how basic influence techniques work, and as a bonus its fun to watch - if you have Netflix! On Netflix, look up season 3, episode 1 of Magic for Humans, and fast forward to the 15:30 mark. Some millennials who are themselves influencers and think they are above it all get a harsh, yet hilarious, lesson in just how human they are....after you watch this, think of the things you expose you and your families to, and consider how they are being influenced. I hope you take some time to reflect on that. https://www.netflix.com/title/80190510
  7. Not a doc, but I have spent a lot of time with mathematical modeling and I've been to most of the places where the spread has been the worst. The one aspect I would point out is that the US population is vastly more spread out on both the micro and macro levels than any of the hotspots. Until you've been to Seoul or any Chinese megacity, you just can't appreciate how dense the population is. You also won't realize how unique to the US culture the concept of "personal space" is. People in Europe think nothing of talking to you 6 inches from your face. People in most of Asia have no problem with someone physically crawling over them for a bus or train seat, the sole exception being hyper-polite, fastidiously clean Japan (where the impact has been very minimal, despite high population density). Italy combined the concept of no personal space with a direct travel pipeline to the most infected parts of China, thanks to their collaboration on the Silk Road project, and an aged population - worst possible case combo. Then tack on heavily government controlled socialized medicine in Italy as well. My point is that "social distancing" is easy for Americans, both conceptually and physically. I think that in itself will damp the spread here. I wonder how much those things will affect R0? I also think that, as CPD put it, Hindsight is 50-50 wrt to our national reaction here. It wasn't perfect, but it has been solid in many respects.
  8. It's not new. One of my HS friends went to the "State Department" (not really) from AU back in '88. The first guy KIA in Afghanistan was an AU grad working for a three letter agency. Better us than the coastal elites who don't have much appreciation for the flyover states.
  9. Issues like this may be why he left? Hate to see any kid go off the rails. https://www.foxnews.com/sports/college-football-player-slams-officer-on-concrete-video
  10. Actually Casinious Moore was supposed to be our starter and bellcow back that year. He had flashes, but never could stay healthy enough during his career here. Joe Whitt first casually mentioned this Rudi guy would be our starter at an alumni club meeting late that summer, and even that was qualified by a potential return of a healthy Moore. Until then, he was just a late pickup that we got along with Daniel Cobb. The Recruiting Eagle was still around then I think, and Mark Murphy may have just started his site. I don't recall which was up and which wasn't, but I was active on the one that was - went straight from the death of the RE to Mark's site. There wasn't a lot of buzz at all on Rudi online until he looked good in Fall camp, but no one really started talking about him until Wyoming.
  11. I looked for the story, but all I could find was that we stumbled across him when we went to see Daniel Cobb play, and then there was this line in a xCTT story: "Tuberville found an unknown tailback in junior college named Rudi Johnson." According to the only recruiting database that goes that far back, AU was Rudi's only offer.
  12. No one else in the P5 recruited him. Wish I could remember the school he had packed to leave for, someplace like Cincinnati or Eastern Kentucky. May not have even been a scholarship-level U, as I recall we got him after NSD and he couldn't have reneged on a LOI back then.
  13. 1. Biggest surprise - I think a lot of you guys are forgetting just how Rudi Johnson got here. He was packing up to head off to some MAC or Sunbelt school to play ball, all but completely unrecruited, when Tubs gave him a call. He might have already been driving to that school, I don't recall the exact details. No one knew what we had until he made a Superman cape out of a Wyoming defender in a game we might well have lost. 2. The biggest bust - This is defined by recruiting hype vs production, so Roc wins this in a landslide 3. The biggest disappointment - Show some potential, then don't live up to it has a pic of Kamryn Pettaway next to it. Jovon is honorable mention. 4. The most underrated - CAP, then Tate, Stewart, Corey Grant, and several others. 5. The most underutilized - Poor Brandon Jacobs. If only he'd been here a few years before..... 6. The one you could have one more year - Too many to list for this one! Having said that, KJ's lateral quickness would have made a big difference the year after he left with a bad OL.
  14. Yeeeaahhh, sort of. A friend's son was a 3* FS out west. All the Ivy's said "We don't offer scholarships, but you'll never pay anything to go here either". Parents were 0.05%-ers. The recruiting approach was very much a financial-based "Here's what we're effectively paying you to come here" one.