Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
StatTiger

Spotlight on Carlton Davis

6 posts in this topic

One of the season highlights was the performance of freshman Carlton Davis. The Auburn corner back was named to the All-SEC Freshman team, finishing the season with 56 tackles (6th best on the team), 3 interceptions, 8 passes defended and 1 forced-fumble. Davis improved as the season progressed, laying the foundation for what will likely become a brilliant career. He finished the season by leading the Auburn in tackles against Memphis, while setting up a key interception in the end zone.

The play...

Mem%20-%20Davis%20and%20Lawson%20Sack_zps7x6mnqrc.jpg

On this play Memphis faces a 2nd & 10 from their own 36-yard line an will run a play-action pass. At the snap, the Memphis RG will pull left to sell the run-look and will attempt to double-team Cassanova McKinzy coming through the C-gap with the RB. Carlton Davis does an excellent job of not tipping off the corner blitz before he attacks off the edge. (DB's will often ease towards the backfield just before the snap, which often is recognized by the quarterback.)

Carl Lawson will loop over the top of the pocket with a 1 on 1 with the RT. McKinzy disrupts the pocket forcing the quarterback towards the crashing Carl Lawson. The quarterback is first hit by Carl Lawson as the pocket collapses. As Lawson attempts to wrap up the quarterback, Carlton Davis arrives to finish off the sack. He is followed by Montravius Adams who gangs up with Lawson and Davis to bring the quarterback down for an 8-yard loss.

Carl Lawson's return to the field during the Ole Miss game allowed Auburn to apply more pressure on the opposing quarterback. Without Lawson in the lineup Auburn averaged only 3.3 QB hurries per game. With Lawson Auburn averaged 8.3 per game.

Not since Carlos Rogers in 2001, have we seen the type of impact from an Auburn DB during their freshman campaign. With this in mind here is a comparison of the their freshman seasons...

2015: Davis had 56 tackles, 2 TFL, 3 INT and 8 PBU

2001: Rogers had 64 tackles, 1 TFL, 0 INT and 12 PBU

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites




Even more impressive though would be the play-calling for that CB blitz. Play-action passes are notorious for getting QBs killed against a blitz. On a 2nd and 10, because of the balanced run-pass percentages of the down, second down being one where the chance is almost 50:50, but the field position, it was excellently called by Coach Thompson. Memphis having a greater reliance on the pass game also gives me further inclination to believe that they knew the PA was coming. Since second down is usually conventionally thought as one to further get into decent position for a manageable 3rd down, it would make opposing teams believe it was a run coming this play instead of a pass, which meant the PA was set up perfectly. What makes this beautiful is that corner blitzes will eat PA alive.

When the WR releases off of the line, yes he is uncovered for a split second, which in a normal drop back pass would be an easy read and toss for decent gain, assuming the back end is playing man, or the WR sits where the CB left. But play action requires the QB, especially from under center (Although Lynch was in the gun.) to sell the run and go though a hand-off motion, taking away time for him to survey the field or be able to hit his WR quickly. Also the protection up front, because they have to sell the run, is already susceptible to extra rushes as OL is forced to jump the DL in pass pro with a 60's-like protection concept. If beat off of the line initially or shucked really quickly, it is almost impossible to recover from this aggressive form of protection. We see this play out with both Cass and Lawson able to beat their initial men off of the snap. (Cass already has an advantage since his man is a pulling guard and the call dictates for him to penetrate initially and disrupt rather than play a running lane.) Also, because Cass sucks up the double team from the back, it leaves Davis as a free blitzer, who is normally the RB's assignment. Either way, this defensive call was either a stroke of genius, or pure luck. But it definitely proves to be a reliable counter to teams that like PA. Especially those operating in the I or out of the Ace-Singleback look.

Edited by Malcolm_FleX48

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah, this play really stood out, even among the plays that made up an awesome defensive performance!

Stat, thanks for the comparison between Davis and Rogers. Nice to see a player earning that kind of lofty comparison with play on the field.

Flex, thanks for your insight, too -- makes perfect sense that a blitz would be a great call to defend a play action pass.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Even more impressive though would be the play-calling for that CB blitz. Play-action passes are notorious for getting QBs killed against a blitz. On a 2nd and 10, because of the balanced run-pass percentages of the down, second down being one where the chance is almost 50:50, but the field position, it was excellently called by Coach Thompson. Memphis having a greater reliance on the pass game also gives me further inclination to believe that they knew the PA was coming. Since second down is usually conventionally thought as one to further get into decent position for a manageable 3rd down, it would make opposing teams believe it was a run coming this play instead of a pass, which meant the PA was set up perfectly. What makes this beautiful is that corner blitzes will eat PA alive.

When the WR releases off of the line, yes he is uncovered for a split second, which in a normal drop back pass would be an easy read and toss for decent gain, assuming the back end is playing man, or the WR sits where the CB left. But play action requires the QB, especially from under center (Although Lynch was in the gun.) to sell the run and go though a hand-off motion, taking away time for him to survey the field or be able to hit his WR quickly. Also the protection up front, because they have to sell the run, is already susceptible to extra rushes as OL is forced to jump the DL in pass pro with a 60's-like protection concept. If beat off of the line initially or shucked really quickly, it is almost impossible to recover from this aggressive form of protection. We see this play out with both Cass and Lawson able to beat their initial men off of the snap. (Cass already has an advantage since his man is a pulling guard and the call dictates for him to penetrate initially and disrupt rather than play a running lane.) Also, because Cass sucks up the double team from the back, it leaves Davis as a free blitzer, who is normally the RB's assignment. Either way, this defensive call was either a stroke of genius, or pure luck. But it definitely proves to be a reliable counter to teams that like PA. Especially those operating in the I or out of the Ace-Singleback look.

Yes Flex, as before, I was thinking the exact same thing. You once again beat me to it. :bow:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Didn't Rodgers go to prep school before coming to AU? That would have made him a year older in his freshman year. One more year to adjust to school away from home too.

When a true freshman can come in and play like Davis did this year, you know he is an exceptional talent.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The comparison to Carlos Rogers is lofty ... and interesting. Hope Carlton continues to work and improve; agree he has the potential to be special.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

  • Members Online

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.