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StatTiger

Rushing Numbers relative to competition

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Looking at statistical data can be misleading at times, especially when the level of competition isn't considered. For example, Auburn rushing for 220-yards against an opponent that allows only 97-yards per game is far more impressive than Auburn rushing for 350-yards against a team that surrenders 240-yards per game. The 220-yard performance would be a 127% improvement over what the opponent normally surrenders, while the 350-yard performance would be a 46% performance. With this in mind, here is the percentage of rushing yardage Auburn gained against what their opponent normally allowed. I included the number of run-defenses each team faced that held their opponent to under 120-yards rushing for the season (They fall in the column marked T-Def). I also included the average rushing yardage allowed by the opponent for the season and the final column is strength of schedule.

Auburn's top-25 run offenses from 1970-2015:

Yardage%20Comparison_zpsjfjjgkvu.jpg

The 1983 team was amazing considering the schedule they faced that year. The 1983 Auburn wishbone offense averaged over 100% more yardage than their opponent allowed. It should be noted Auburn has won 80 percent of their games since 1970, when they rush for at least 40 percent more than what their opponent normally allows. The 1985 team accomplished the same feat as well thanks to one Bo Jackson and Brent Fullwood..

Gus Malzahn's offense has 4 run-offenses in the top-10 of the 46 teams from 1970-2015. It is astounding Auburn finished 10-3 in 1997 despite being held to 33% below their opponent's rush-yardage allowed. Dameyune Craig carried the offense on his back and the 1998 record the following season reveals just how much. In the event anyone was wondering, the 2004 team finished at No. 26 at 17.4 percent.

Interesting note that 8 of the top-9 run offenses possessed a QB as a threat to run with the football.

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Well, Randy Campbell was technically a threat to run. ;)

I guess Pat Dye thought so since he was a two-year starter and was required to make the right reads within the wishbone. He averaged over 10 carries per game and Auburn had the fewest number of turnovers during 1982 and 1983 combined. Even if he did not break 50 yard runs, the opposing defenses had to respect him on the edge, which opened up the belly play with the FB.

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Well, Randy Campbell was technically a threat to run. ;)/>

I guess Pat Dye thought so since he was a two-year starter and was required to make the right reads within the wishbone. He averaged over 10 carries per game and Auburn had the fewest number of turnovers during 1982 and 1983 combined. Even if he did not break 50 yard runs, the opposing defenses had to respect him on the edge, which opened up the belly play with the FB.

All true, Stat. I loved him as a player. But he's the one ball carrier during those years for whom I don't have a clear memory of a single carry. But I noticed he averaged 2.4 and 2.2 yards a carry those years, so perhaps that's why. He was a great leader on a great team.

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I'm surprised the 2004 team didn't make the top 25. I know Jason Campbell had a fantastic year passing, but we had a couple of fantastic RBs as well.

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I'm surprised the 2004 team didn't make the top 25. I know Jason Campbell had a fantastic year passing, but we had a couple of fantastic RBs as well.

Odd. 2002 2003 and 2005 made the top 15

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This supports my personal bias that 1983 was the best AU team in my lifetime. 1993, 2004, and obviously 2010 were really good teams (don't want to shortchange 1972 and 1974). But what the 1983 team accomplished against the quality of opposition that they faced....hands down the best AU team and really shouldn't be an argument (this argument starts in 1966).

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I'm surprised the 2004 team didn't make the top 25. I know Jason Campbell had a fantastic year passing, but we had a couple of fantastic RBs as well.

You are correct about Jason Campbell's outstanding year. The 2004 was balanced and in terms of total yardage gained relative to what the opponent allowed, they were No. 15 over the past 46 seasons.

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This supports my personal bias that 1983 was the best AU team in my lifetime. 1993, 2004, and obviously 2010 were really good teams (don't want to shortchange 1972 and 1974). But what the 1983 team accomplished against the quality of opposition that they faced....hands down the best AU team and really shouldn't be an argument (this argument starts in 1966).

There are plenty of Auburn fans that feel the same way about the 1983 Auburn Tigers.

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When looking at stats, the 2014 team is a head scratcher. We completely underperformed that year, especially the 2nd half. I think the LSU game that year was the 1 game where we played to our fullest potential.

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When looking at stats, the 2014 team is a head scratcher. We completely underperformed that year, especially the 2nd half. I think the LSU game that year was the 1 game where we played to our fullest potential.

During the first half of the season Auburn's defense held their opponent to -41.8% below their scoring average. During the second-half of the season, the opponent gained +8.6% more than their normal average against Auburn.

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