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2016 Spring Practice - Day 2


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Auburn's Gus Malzahn on second practice: 'The thing that stood out to me was our energy… I kind of like where we're at.'

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Auburn's Gus Malzahn says Saturday's practice in Jordan-Hare Stadium 'won't be a scrimmage, but it will be physical.'

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Gus Malzahn said he may make quarterbacks 'live' in a practice after spring break in an effort to determine who's ahead of the game

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Gus Malzahn on his receivers and their coach, Kodi Burns: 'Those guys are flying round out there, and Kodi is flying around with them.'

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Gus Malzahn on the return of surgically-repaired QB Tyler Queen: 'We have him on a pitch count as far as his arm is concerned.'

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Gus Malzahn on his new and sporty BMW i8. 'I never had a sports car. I turned 50. I figured it was time to go ahead and get one.'

@AUGoldMine

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Ok WDE/WDE, around the 7:15 mark of Gus' presser a reporter asked about his new offensive coaching staff. Paraphrasing the question; could your staff be considered "yes" men? After rambling a little, Gus says he has asked their opinion about a lot of stuff. Not much insight here. In your opinion, has anything changed with this new staff?

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Ok WDE/WDE, around the 7:15 mark of Gus' presser a reporter asked about his new offensive coaching staff. Paraphrasing the question; could your staff be considered "yes" men? After rambling a little, Gus says he has asked their opinion about a lot of stuff. Not much insight here. In your opinion, has anything changed with this new staff?

No... all Gus.

Now, he just finally has guys who think the same way as him (and/or) "yes men".

Horton is our only offensive coach who will push the envelope.

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Thanks Altima, I guess we'll see how the season progresses with this single minded coaching staff.

This is Gus's choice. There are 2 kind of bosses in this world. Those that ask for input and those that do not. We will all work for both types throughout our career. Both can be successful. No subordinate has any "right" to have their input taken and put into action. It is the boss's final decision because the boss will be the one that is held responsible in the end. I have no problem however Gus runs his program. His responsibility; his a**.

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Thanks Altima, I guess we'll see how the season progresses with this single minded coaching staff.

This is Gus's choice. There are 2 kind of bosses in this world. Those that ask for input and those that do not. We will all work for both types throughout our career. Both can be successful. No subordinate has any "right" to have their input taken and put into action. It is the boss's final decision because the boss will be the one that is held responsible in the end. I have no problem however Gus runs his program. His responsibility; his a**.

Agree that there are 2 types of bosses. But, if you are going to build a team that works together the boss (I think) would like to give the impression that each subordinate brings something valuable to the table. If the boss ignores input from his subordinates the team building will stop and during periods of stress valuable input will not be communicated.

I, too, have no problem with how Gus runs his program. I just would like to see an improvement over last year.

The other issue with "yes" men is the lack of developing leadership in your subordinates. I wonder how long it will take for one of Gus' coaches to land a head coaching job?

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Thanks Altima, I guess we'll see how the season progresses with this single minded coaching staff.

This is Gus's choice. There are 2 kind of bosses in this world. Those that ask for input and those that do not. We will all work for both types throughout our career. Both can be successful. No subordinate has any "right" to have their input taken and put into action. It is the boss's final decision because the boss will be the one that is held responsible in the end. I have no problem however Gus runs his program. His responsibility; his a**.

I agree

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Thanks Altima, I guess we'll see how the season progresses with this single minded coaching staff.

This is Gus's choice. There are 2 kind of bosses in this world. Those that ask for input and those that do not. We will all work for both types throughout our career. Both can be successful. No subordinate has any "right" to have their input taken and put into action. It is the boss's final decision because the boss will be the one that is held responsible in the end. I have no problem however Gus runs his program. His responsibility; his a**.

Agree that there are 2 types of bosses. But, if you are going to build a team that works together the boss (I think) would like to give the impression that each subordinate brings something valuable to the table. If the boss ignores input from his subordinates the team building will stop and during periods of stress valuable input will not be communicated.

I, too, have no problem with how Gus runs his program. I just would like to see an improvement over last year.

The other issue with "yes" men is the lack of developing leadership in your subordinates. I wonder how long it will take for one of Gus' coaches to land a head coaching job?

We had one leave this year for a HC at USCe :dunno:

:drippingsarcasm7pa:

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Huh? The entire staff better be on the same page in terms of goals, the play book, player responsibilities, etc. And the entire staff better be aligned to the boss. Does that make them "yes men"? If so, I'm all for it.

But every good head coach delegates responsibility to his staff, clearly defining exactly what they need to accomplish with the players. There better be a lot of communication within the group as to how to achieve their objectives, and all assistants contribute to this. They also contribute to week-to-week game planning and the best ways to leverage strengths and cover weaknesses.

In my experience, every successful organization of any type functions in this way. And in football, well, just ask NS if he is surrounded by "yes men."

Staff may differ in their ability to optimize results, but they better buy into to the vision and leadership of their organization, or they won't be around for long.

Edited by AURex
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Does anyone else think it's odd that we have a coach who is widely considered one of if not the brightest offensive minds in college football, and when he has one year where a series of incidents, many out of his control, colluded to create a poor offensive performance, that suddenly a bunch of people think it's bad that he wants people on his staff that share his philosophy?

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Does anyone else think it's odd that we have a coach who is widely considered one of if not the brightest offensive minds in college football, and when he has one year where a series of incidents, many out of his control, colluded to create a poor offensive performance, that suddenly a bunch of people think it's bad that he wants people on his staff that share his philosophy?

odd or sad?
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Does anyone else think it's odd that we have a coach who is widely considered one of if not the brightest offensive minds in college football, and when he has one year where a series of incidents, many out of his control, colluded to create a poor offensive performance, that suddenly a bunch of people think it's bad that he wants people on his staff that share his philosophy?

odd or sad?

Either works.
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Huh? The entire staff better be on the same page in terms of goals, the play book, player responsibilities, etc. And the entire staff better be aligned to the boss. Does that make them "yes men"? If so, I'm all for it.

But every good head coach delegates responsibility to his staff, clearly defining exactly what they need to accomplish with the players. There better be a lot of communication within the group as to how to achieve their objectives, and all assistants contribute to this. They also contribute to week-to-week game planning and the best ways to leverage strengths and cover weaknesses.

In my experience, every successful organization of any type functions in this way. And in football, well, just ask NS if he is surrounded by "yes men."

Staff may differ in their ability to optimize results, but they better buy into to the vision and leadership of their organization, or they won't be around for long.

I agree with most of this, it has been mentioned that Gus is very stubborn, I have no idea, but he needs to be during 90% of what he does. The only issue I have with "yes men" is when pressure is on (usually during a game) they never have an original thought when it hits the fan. And I'm talking about the in game situations only. You brought up NS, in 2014 Iron Bowl 2nd half, their QB just threw his 3rd INT. The camera panned to NS and LK having a discussion on the sidelines. The speculation was that NS was discussing the QB situation and the back up was beginning to throw. After Auburn scored, the starting Bama QB returned to the field and the rest is history.

I'm not sure there would be any conversations like that with the coaching staff he as assembled. Offensively, they are not very experienced and if things don't go as planned (Gus loves to stick with the plan) who has guts to offer an alternate solution that he would listen to? For example, I have to believe that some assistant thought is was not a good idea to trot SW out for a 2nd series in the UGA game, yet it was the plan and it happened. It is just a concern, not predicting it's going to happen, I hope his offensive guru status is restored and my concerns will be just an after thought after the season.

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People get frustrated when they sit in the stands watching the offense struggle while the "brightest offensive mind" in college football appears stubborn, predictable, and set in his ways.

I'm willing to have patience, I think Gus needs a few more years to get his feet under him.

Edited by keesler
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Huh? The entire staff better be on the same page in terms of goals, the play book, player responsibilities, etc. And the entire staff better be aligned to the boss. Does that make them "yes men"? If so, I'm all for it.

But every good head coach delegates responsibility to his staff, clearly defining exactly what they need to accomplish with the players. There better be a lot of communication within the group as to how to achieve their objectives, and all assistants contribute to this. They also contribute to week-to-week game planning and the best ways to leverage strengths and cover weaknesses.

In my experience, every successful organization of any type functions in this way. And in football, well, just ask NS if he is surrounded by "yes men."

Staff may differ in their ability to optimize results, but they better buy into to the vision and leadership of their organization, or they won't be around for long.

I agree with most of this, it has been mentioned that Gus is very stubborn, I have no idea, but he needs to be during 90% of what he does. The only issue I have with "yes men" is when pressure is on (usually during a game) they never have an original thought when it hits the fan. And I'm talking about the in game situations only. You brought up NS, in 2014 Iron Bowl 2nd half, their QB just threw his 3rd INT. The camera panned to NS and LK having a discussion on the sidelines. The speculation was that NS was discussing the QB situation and the back up was beginning to throw. After Auburn scored, the starting Bama QB returned to the field and the rest is history.

I'm not sure there would be any conversations like that with the coaching staff he as assembled. Offensively, they are not very experienced and if things don't go as planned (Gus loves to stick with the plan) who has guts to offer an alternate solution that he would listen to? For example, I have to believe that some assistant thought is was not a good idea to trot SW out for a 2nd series in the UGA game, yet it was the plan and it happened. It is just a concern, not predicting it's going to happen, I hope his offensive guru status is restored and my concerns will be just an after thought after the season.

These are good examples. But I would think you could easily make the speculation that LK was arguing for change and NS said no. And in the AU/GA game what if some assistant convinced Gus to make the change? While it could have been some assistant's idea, in the end it falls on Gus.

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