JMR

Coach's Corner: Auburn vs LSU....

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Coach’s Corner: Auburn vs LSU….

In its fourth consecutive home game, Auburn (1-2, 0-1) hosts the LSU Tigers (2-1, 1-0) this week. With a 5 PM kickoff time, the game is part of an ESPN SEC triple header, sandwiched between Georgia-Ole Miss, and Arkansas-Texas A&M.

I won’t insult anyone by stating that Auburn desperately needs to win this game. Anyone who follows Auburn football at all is aware of what’s going on and where things stand. But almost as important as winning is how the team plays, on both sides of the ball.

Les Miles is in his 12th year as the head man at LSU, with a record of 114-33. He is 8-3 against Auburn, and 2-1 against Gus Malzahn. Miles is only the second coach in LSU history to win 100 games, and he reached that mark faster than any other.

Other LSU coaches familiar to Auburn fans include OL Coach/Run Game Coordinator Jeff Grimes (AU OL coach from 2009-2012) and Wide Receiver Coach Dameyune Craig.

LSU Offense:

Offensively, LSU is kind of a throwback. They operate mostly out of a Pro-I formation, using a tight end much of the time (they actually throw to the TE), and the QB under center. They have a traditional blocking fullback in junior J.D. Moore (6-4, 244), and an All-American tailback in Leonard Fournette (6-1, 235, Jr.). The offensive line is bigger than most in college football, and includes a 6-7 center in senior Ethan Pocic. The best of the offensive linemen is probably senior K.J. Malone (6-4, 303), who is the son of NBA great Karl Malone.

I’ve heard lots of Auburn people say “LSU isn’t playing any better than us”. Obviously, that’s in the eye of the beholder, but I think LSU has some good things going on. Maybe the most notable among those is the quarterback situation, a factor that Auburn fans are all too familiar with recently. Finally tired of waiting for Brandon Harris to mature into an SEC-level QB, LSU named Purdue transfer Danny Etling the starter a week ago, and he has responded well. A 6-0, 215 junior, Etling is athletic enough to run very well when necessary, and has very good accuracy and touch on the ball. He’s played in two games this season, getting his first start last week, and has hit on 25 of 44 pass attempts (56.8%) for 2 touchdowns and 1 interception.

The Bengal Tigers have size and speed at wide receiver. Senior Travin Dural (6-2, 207) is the leading receiver with 10 catches, followed by junior Malachi Dupre (6-4, 195) with 7. D.J. Chark (6-3, 190, Jr.) is the speed guy and deep threat in the group. Tight end Colin Jeter (6-7, 254, Jr.) is targeted frequently on seam routes and out patterns in combination with a wide receiver.

LSU has run the ball roughly 60% of the time, and the bulk of that is, of course, Leonard Fournette. Fournette looks faster this season, and definitely has great speed for a man his size. I’m sure most Auburn fans will remember him going for 71 yards on the opening play of the game in 2015, and things going downhill after that. Fournette catches the ball well, and will be used in that capacity as well. Most of what we will see of Fournette this week will be him following his fullback into the hole on isolation plays, or outside on sweeps. He’s averaging about 5.5 yards per carry, but he’s always a threat to break a tackle and take it to the house.

LSU Defense:

Much credit has been given to LSU for the hiring of new Defensive Coordinator Dave Aranda. Prior to joining Les Miles in Baton Rouge, Aranda was DC at Wisconsin, where his defense over that three-year period was Top Five in the nation in the four major defensive categories…..scoring, total yards allowed, rushing yards allowed, and passing yards allowed.

Through three games win 2016, Aranda’s LSU defense has held opponents to an average of 2.9 yards per rushing attempt.
LSU deploys in a multitude of alignments defensively, and seldom shows the same look two plays in a row. They alternate between a 3 man front and a 4 man front, sometimes in a 4-3, or 4-2, and sometimes in a 3-3. Aranda is a big believer in pressure, and has made the statement, “I’ve never met a blitz I didn’t like”.

LSU is very physical in the box, led by middle linebacker Kendall Beckwith (6-3, 250, Sr.). OLB Arden Key (6-6, 240, Soph.), a player Auburn recruited heavily, is key to the LSU pass rush, and has 5 sacks in 3 games, matching his sack total for all of 2015. Key is extremely long, and it will be of major interest to Auburn fans this week how he plays Auburn’s zone read.
Defensive end Davon Godcheaux (6-4, 299, Jr.) is in his third season as a starter on the LSU defensive line. I can remember him getting abused as a true freshman starter, but those days are over for him.

In all, LSU returns 7 starters from their 2015 defense. That experience has seemingly eased their transition from former DC Kevin Steele’s schemes in 2015 to new DC Aranda’s in 2016. The secondary is solid, led by lockdown corner Tre’Davious White (6-0, 197, Sr.). Strong safety Jamal Adams (6-1, 213, Jr.) and corner Kevin Tolliver (6-2, 193, Soph.) are both returning starters in the secondary. Although the Tigers have plenty of experience in the starting secondary, they are not very experienced when the backups play.

Special Teams:

LSU Special Teams have been traditionally strong under Les Miles. Kicker Colby Delahoussaye (5-10, 180, Sr.) has only attempted one field goal in 2016, making good on a 27-yarder. But he’s in his third season as the LSU kicker, and owns a career percentage over 80%. Miles has apparently developed an affinity for Australian punters, and this year’s version is Josh Growden, a 6-1, 198 redshirt freshman from Sydney. Growden is averaging 39.8 on the season, but punted 5 times in his last game for a 49-yard average, including two over sixty yards.

LSU is dangerous in the return game, with Tre’Davious White one short of the LSU record for touchdowns on punt returns. Backup tailback Derrius Guice (5-11, 212, Soph.) is the primary kickoff returner, and has outstanding speed.

How Will They Play It?

As this is a game both head coaches badly need to win, I’d expect all stops to be pulled out, including trick plays, gambles on fourth down, and all that. LSU will feed the ball to Fournette, and if Auburn crowds the box to stop the run, they’ll let Etling throw the ball. No doubt former Auburn coach Dameyune Craig will be in Offensive Coordinator Cam Cameron’s ear, pleading “Throw the ball! We can beat ‘em deep!”. With a fairly accomplished passer in Etling, and quality wide receivers, there’s little doubt that LSU will hit some passes. But the bottom line to beating Les Miles’ version of LSU is to stop the run. If Auburn can find a way to do that, this game can be won.

For reasons that should be obvious, I’m reluctant to guess what Gus Malzahn will do offensively this week. Given the offensive performances in the season’s first three games, I’m not sure anything can safely be ruled out . I would guess (and I do mean GUESS) that Auburn will try to play physical football and utilize Kamryn Pettway heavily. If that works, then the play action passing game that has always been a part of the Malzahn offense should also work.

Whatever Auburn’s offensive plan is for the game, it’ll be interesting to see how and if Auburn adjusts throughout the game to what the LSU defense is doing.

Bottom Line:

For being three games into the season, it’s pretty obvious that Auburn has a long way to go in terms of being able to compete in the SEC West. A huge step in that direction can be taken this weekend, but taking that step will require a maximum effort from everyone in the program, from the ball boys to Malzahn himself. It will also require a huge effort from the Auburn people in the stadium. It can certainly be done. It’s been done before. I like the fact that we are playing LSU this week. They are very physical, and beating them requires some serious determination and desire. Surely Auburn can muster those characteristics in sufficient quantity to make it happen. I’m looking forward to finding out.
Coach’s Corner: Auburn vs LSU….
 
  In its fourth consecutive home game, Auburn (1-2, 0-1) hosts the LSU Tigers (2-1, 1-0) this week. With a 5 PM kickoff time, the game is part of an ESPN SEC triple header, sandwiched between Georgia-Ole Miss, and Arkansas-Texas A&M.
  I won’t insult anyone by stating that Auburn desperately needs to win this game. Anyone who follows Auburn football at all is aware of what’s going on and where things stand. But almost as important as winning is how the team plays, on both sides of the ball.
 
  Les Miles is in his 12th year as the head man at LSU, with a record of 114-33. He is 8-3 against Auburn, and 2-1 against Gus Malzahn. Miles is only the second coach in LSU to win 100 games, and he reached that mark faster than any other.
  Other LSU coaches familiar to Auburn fans include OL Coach/Run Game Coordinator Jeff Grimes (AU OL coach from 2009-2012) and Wide Receiver Coach Dameyune Craig.
 
LSU Offense:
 
  Offensively, LSU is kind of a throwback. They operate mostly out of a Pro-I formation, using a tight end much of the time (they actually throw to the TE), and the QB under center. They have a traditional blocking fullback in junior J.D. Moore (6-4, 244), and an All-American tailback in Leonard Fournette (6-1, 235, Jr.). The offensive line is bigger than most in college football, and includes a 6-7 center in senior Ethan Pocic. The best of the offensive linemen is probably senior K.J. Malone (6-4, 303), who is the son of NBA great Karl Malone.
  I’ve heard lots of Auburn people say “LSU isn’t playing any better than us”. Obviously, that’s in the eye of the beholder, but I think LSU has some good things going on. Maybe the most notable among those is the quarterback situation, a factor that Auburn fans are all too familiar with recently. Finally tired of waiting for Brandon Harris to mature into an SEC-level QB, LSU named Purdue transfer Danny Etling the starter a week  ago, and he has responded well. A 6-0, 215 junior, Etling is athletic enough to run very well when necessary, and has very good accuracy and touch on the ball. He’s played in two games this season, getting his first start last week, and has hit on 25 of 44 pass attempts  (56.8%) for 2 touchdowns and 1 interception.
  The Bengal Tigers have size and speed at wide receiver. Senior Travin Dural (6-2, 207) is the leading receiver with 10 catches, followed by junior Malachi Dupre (6-4, 195) with 7. D.J. Chark (6-3, 190, Jr.) is the speed guy and deep threat in the group. Tight end Colin Jeter (6-7, 254, Jr.) is targeted frequently on seam routes and out patterns in combination with a wide receiver.
   
  LSU has run the ball roughly 60% of the time, and the bulk of that is, of course, Leonard Fournette. Fournette looks faster this season, and definitely has great speed for a man his size. I’m sure most Auburn fans will remember him going for 71 yards on the opening play of the game in 2015, and things going downhill after that. Fournette catches the ball well, and will be used in that capacity as well. Most of what we will see of Fournette this week will be him following his fullback into the hole on isolation plays, or outside on sweeps. He’s averaging about 5.5 yards per carry, but he’s always a threat to break a tackle and take it to the house.
 
 
LSU Defense:
 
  Much credit has been given to LSU for the hiring of new Defensive Coordinator Dave Aranda. Prior to joining Les Miles in Baton Rouge, Aranda was DC at Wisconsin, where his defense over that three-year period was Top Five in the nation in the four major defensive categories…..scoring, total yards allowed, rushing yards allowed, and passing yards allowed.
Through three games win 2016, Aranda’s LSU defense has held opponents to an average of 2.9 yards per rushing attempt.
  LSU deploys in a multitude of alignments defensively, and seldom shows the same look two plays in a row. They alternate between a 3 man front and a 4 man front, sometimes in a 4-3, or 4-2, and sometimes in a 3-3. Aranda is a big believer in pressure, and has made the statement, “I’ve never met a blitz I didn’t like”.
 
  LSU is very physical in the box, led by middle linebacker Kendall Beckwith (6-3, 250, Sr.). OLB Arden Key (6-6, 240, Soph.), a player Auburn recruited heavily, is key to the LSU pass rush, and has 5 sacks in 3 games, matching his sack total for all of 2015. Key is extremely long, and it will be of major interest to Auburn fans this week how he plays Auburn’s zone read.
  Defensive end Davon Godcheaux (6-4, 299, Jr.) is in his third season as a starter on the LSU defensive line. I can remember him getting abused as a true freshman starter, but those days are over for him.
 
  In all, LSU returns 7 starters from their 2015 defense. That experience has seemingly eased their transition from former DC Kevin Steele’s schemes in 2015 to new DC Aranda’s in 2016. The secondary is solid, led by lockdown corner Tre’Davious White (6-0, 197, Sr.). Strong safety Jamal Adams (6-1, 213, Jr.) and corner Kevin Tolliver (6-2, 193, Soph.) are both returning starters in the secondary. Although the Tigers have plenty of experience in the starting secondary, they are not very experienced when the backups play.
 
 
Special Teams:
 
  LSU Special Teams have been traditionally strong under Les Miles. Kicker Corey Delahoussaye (5-10, 180, Sr.) has only attempted one field goal in 2016, making good on a 27-yarder. But he’s in his third season as the LSU kicker, and owns a career percentage over 80%. Miles has apparently developed an affinity for Australian punters, and this year’s version is Josh Growden, a 6-1, 198 redshirt freshman from Sydney. Growden is averaging 39.8 on the season, but punted 5 times in his last game for a 49-yard average, including two over sixty yards.
  LSU is dangerous in the return game, with Tre’Davious White one short of the LSU record for touchdowns on punt returns. Backup tailback Derris Guice (5-11, 212, Soph.) is the primary kickoff returner, and has outstanding speed.
 
How Will They Play It?
 
  As this is a game both head coaches badly need to win, I’d expect all stops to be pulled out, including trick plays, gambles on fourth down, and all that. LSU will feed the ball to Fournette, and if Auburn crowds the box to stop the run, they’ll let Etling throw the ball. No doubt former Auburn coach Dameyune Craig will be in Offensive Coordinator Cam Cameron’s ear, pleading “Throw the ball! We can beat ‘em deep!”.  With a fairly accomplished passer in Etling, and quality wide receivers, there’s little doubt that LSU will hit some passes. But the bottom line to beating Les Miles’ version of LSU is to stop the run. If Auburn can find a way to do that, this game can be won.
  For reasons that should be obvious, I’m reluctant to guess what Gus Malzahn will do offensively this week. Given the offensive performances in the season’s first three games, I’m not sure anything can safely be ruled out . I would guess (and I do mean GUESS) that Auburn will try to play physical football and utilize Kamryn Pettway heavily. If that works, then the play action passing game that has always been a part of the Malzahn offense should also work.
  Whatever Auburn’s offensive plan is for the game, it’ll be interesting to see how and if Auburn adjusts throughout the game to what the LSU defense is doing.
 
Bottom Line:
 
  For being three games into the season, it’s pretty obvious that Auburn has a long way to go in terms of being able to compete in the SEC West. A huge step in that direction can be taken this weekend, but taking that step will require a maximum effort from everyone in the program, from the ball boys to Malzahn himself. It will also require a huge effort from the Auburn people in the stadium. It can certainly be done. It’s been done before. I like the fact that we are playing LSU this week. They are very physical, and beating them requires some serious determination and desire. Surely Auburn can muster those characteristics in sufficient quantity to make it happen. I’m looking forward to finding out. 
Coach’s Corner: Auburn vs LSU….
 
  In its fourth consecutive home game, Auburn (1-2, 0-1) hosts the LSU Tigers (2-1, 1-0) this week. With a 5 PM kickoff time, the game is part of an ESPN SEC triple header, sandwiched between Georgia-Ole Miss, and Arkansas-Texas A&M.
  I won’t insult anyone by stating that Auburn desperately needs to win this game. Anyone who follows Auburn football at all is aware of what’s going on and where things stand. But almost as important as winning is how the team plays, on both sides of the ball.
 
  Les Miles is in his 12th year as the head man at LSU, with a record of 114-33. He is 8-3 against Auburn, and 2-1 against Gus Malzahn. Miles is only the second coach in LSU to win 100 games, and he reached that mark faster than any other.
  Other LSU coaches familiar to Auburn fans include OL Coach/Run Game Coordinator Jeff Grimes (AU OL coach from 2009-2012) and Wide Receiver Coach Dameyune Craig.
 
LSU Offense:
 
  Offensively, LSU is kind of a throwback. They operate mostly out of a Pro-I formation, using a tight end much of the time (they actually throw to the TE), and the QB under center. They have a traditional blocking fullback in junior J.D. Moore (6-4, 244), and an All-American tailback in Leonard Fournette (6-1, 235, Jr.). The offensive line is bigger than most in college football, and includes a 6-7 center in senior Ethan Pocic. The best of the offensive linemen is probably senior K.J. Malone (6-4, 303), who is the son of NBA great Karl Malone.
  I’ve heard lots of Auburn people say “LSU isn’t playing any better than us”. Obviously, that’s in the eye of the beholder, but I think LSU has some good things going on. Maybe the most notable among those is the quarterback situation, a factor that Auburn fans are all too familiar with recently. Finally tired of waiting for Brandon Harris to mature into an SEC-level QB, LSU named Purdue transfer Danny Etling the starter a week  ago, and he has responded well. A 6-0, 215 junior, Etling is athletic enough to run very well when necessary, and has very good accuracy and touch on the ball. He’s played in two games this season, getting his first start last week, and has hit on 25 of 44 pass attempts  (56.8%) for 2 touchdowns and 1 interception.
  The Bengal Tigers have size and speed at wide receiver. Senior Travin Dural (6-2, 207) is the leading receiver with 10 catches, followed by junior Malachi Dupre (6-4, 195) with 7. D.J. Chark (6-3, 190, Jr.) is the speed guy and deep threat in the group. Tight end Colin Jeter (6-7, 254, Jr.) is targeted frequently on seam routes and out patterns in combination with a wide receiver.
   
  LSU has run the ball roughly 60% of the time, and the bulk of that is, of course, Leonard Fournette. Fournette looks faster this season, and definitely has great speed for a man his size. I’m sure most Auburn fans will remember him going for 71 yards on the opening play of the game in 2015, and things going downhill after that. Fournette catches the ball well, and will be used in that capacity as well. Most of what we will see of Fournette this week will be him following his fullback into the hole on isolation plays, or outside on sweeps. He’s averaging about 5.5 yards per carry, but he’s always a threat to break a tackle and take it to the house.
 
 
LSU Defense:
 
  Much credit has been given to LSU for the hiring of new Defensive Coordinator Dave Aranda. Prior to joining Les Miles in Baton Rouge, Aranda was DC at Wisconsin, where his defense over that three-year period was Top Five in the nation in the four major defensive categories…..scoring, total yards allowed, rushing yards allowed, and passing yards allowed.
Through three games win 2016, Aranda’s LSU defense has held opponents to an average of 2.9 yards per rushing attempt.
  LSU deploys in a multitude of alignments defensively, and seldom shows the same look two plays in a row. They alternate between a 3 man front and a 4 man front, sometimes in a 4-3, or 4-2, and sometimes in a 3-3. Aranda is a big believer in pressure, and has made the statement, “I’ve never met a blitz I didn’t like”.
 
  LSU is very physical in the box, led by middle linebacker Kendall Beckwith (6-3, 250, Sr.). OLB Arden Key (6-6, 240, Soph.), a player Auburn recruited heavily, is key to the LSU pass rush, and has 5 sacks in 3 games, matching his sack total for all of 2015. Key is extremely long, and it will be of major interest to Auburn fans this week how he plays Auburn’s zone read.
  Defensive end Davon Godcheaux (6-4, 299, Jr.) is in his third season as a starter on the LSU defensive line. I can remember him getting abused as a true freshman starter, but those days are over for him.
 
  In all, LSU returns 7 starters from their 2015 defense. That experience has seemingly eased their transition from former DC Kevin Steele’s schemes in 2015 to new DC Aranda’s in 2016. The secondary is solid, led by lockdown corner Tre’Davious White (6-0, 197, Sr.). Strong safety Jamal Adams (6-1, 213, Jr.) and corner Kevin Tolliver (6-2, 193, Soph.) are both returning starters in the secondary. Although the Tigers have plenty of experience in the starting secondary, they are not very experienced when the backups play.
 
 
Special Teams:
 
  LSU Special Teams have been traditionally strong under Les Miles. Kicker Corey Delahoussaye (5-10, 180, Sr.) has only attempted one field goal in 2016, making good on a 27-yarder. But he’s in his third season as the LSU kicker, and owns a career percentage over 80%. Miles has apparently developed an affinity for Australian punters, and this year’s version is Josh Growden, a 6-1, 198 redshirt freshman from Sydney. Growden is averaging 39.8 on the season, but punted 5 times in his last game for a 49-yard average, including two over sixty yards.
  LSU is dangerous in the return game, with Tre’Davious White one short of the LSU record for touchdowns on punt returns. Backup tailback Derris Guice (5-11, 212, Soph.) is the primary kickoff returner, and has outstanding speed.
 
How Will They Play It?
 
  As this is a game both head coaches badly need to win, I’d expect all stops to be pulled out, including trick plays, gambles on fourth down, and all that. LSU will feed the ball to Fournette, and if Auburn crowds the box to stop the run, they’ll let Etling throw the ball. No doubt former Auburn coach Dameyune Craig will be in Offensive Coordinator Cam Cameron’s ear, pleading “Throw the ball! We can beat ‘em deep!”.  With a fairly accomplished passer in Etling, and quality wide receivers, there’s little doubt that LSU will hit some passes. But the bottom line to beating Les Miles’ version of LSU is to stop the run. If Auburn can find a way to do that, this game can be won.
  For reasons that should be obvious, I’m reluctant to guess what Gus Malzahn will do offensively this week. Given the offensive performances in the season’s first three games, I’m not sure anything can safely be ruled out . I would guess (and I do mean GUESS) that Auburn will try to play physical football and utilize Kamryn Pettway heavily. If that works, then the play action passing game that has always been a part of the Malzahn offense should also work.
  Whatever Auburn’s offensive plan is for the game, it’ll be interesting to see how and if Auburn adjusts throughout the game to what the LSU defense is doing.
 
Bottom Line:
 
  For being three games into the season, it’s pretty obvious that Auburn has a long way to go in terms of being able to compete in the SEC West. A huge step in that direction can be taken this weekend, but taking that step will require a maximum effort from everyone in the program, from the ball boys to Malzahn himself. It will also require a huge effort from the Auburn people in the stadium. It can certainly be done. It’s been done before. I like the fact that we are playing LSU this week. They are very physical, and beating them requires some serious determination and desire. Surely Auburn can muster those characteristics in sufficient quantity to make it happen. I’m looking forward to finding out. 
Edited by JMR

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This is going to be a difficult one. I'll be rendering an analysis of the analysis soon, but all I'm going to say is that this is another big (size-wise) receiving corps that can run. Much like A&M had with several large receivers that boasted speed and blocking ability. Auburn has a bit of trouble with teams like this because of their ability to shield catches using their bodies and long limbs. It's going to be a tough game because of the issue that Fournette and Guice present in the backfield, yet the fact that Ettling is a more competent passer than Harris gives them a much greater balance and ability to utilize all that succulent WR talent they've been amassing. 

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"Succulent WR talent".....nice:Sing:

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13 minutes ago, GTNupe11 said:

Right! Hahaha.

 

26 minutes ago, fredst said:

"Succulent WR talent".....nice:Sing:

Lol, as much as we hate to admit it, Les has had a knack for getting all of the best WRs in classes, this year being the exception in which we captured it. 

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Interested in how much inexperienced but top shelf talent gets a serious look in a game where some think the Malzahn era hangs in the balance. Extended drives that end in TOUCHDOWNS is key since Fournette is probably 100%. IMO our D line has more depth than LSU though - if Pettway starts ripping off chunks of yardage up the middle late against a gassed LSU line we may see EFFECTIVE Jet Sweeps, no-huddles and all those football plays we're apparently not supposed to be able to Google.   

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LSU has the first true pocket passer we have seen all year. Hopefully this means the D line can fully commit and be more aggressive without any concerns the QB will scramble. That can only work in our advantage.  My biggest concern is our ability to stop Fournette. I hope D. BROWN gets lots of playing time 5 his Saturday since his strength and size will be much needed. Aren't many 340 pound tackles with his skill set. 

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2 hours ago, Malcolm_FleX48 said:

 

Lol, as much as we hate to admit it, Les has had a knack for getting all of the best WRs in classes, this year being the exception in which we captured it. 

I toast your excellent adjective use:beer2:

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We haven't been able to stop Fournette yet, so what makes people think we can stop him this time? LSU does a good job in mixing their run and pass.

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Coach....curious, I know your view is about LSU, but what do you think their view is of us???? Also how does Kevin and Dameyune play into the game planning for both sides??? Thanks

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14 hours ago, auburn4ever said:

We haven't been able to stop Fournette yet, so what makes people think we can stop him this time? LSU does a good job in mixing their run and pass.

Take out a 10 yard run in mop up duty and he rushed 10 times for 32 yards against us in their 41-7 loss to us in 2014.

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12 hours ago, tigerman1186 said:

Coach....curious, I know your view is about LSU, but what do you think their view is of us???? Also how does Kevin and Dameyune play into the game planning for both sides??? Thanks

As far as Steele goes, he'll obviously have a good handle on the strengths/weaknesses of individual defensive players for LSU, and likely a good feel for how Cam Cameron calls a game, tendencies, etc. On Dameyune Craig, one would HOPE Auburn's offensive staff has made changes to signals, etc., but there's no doubt he has a great understanding of how Auburn's offensive plays are constructed, what defensive schemes cancel out certain plays, and so on. I guess the good news is, DC was not a huge part of the offensive planning process at AU, so maybe he doesn't have as much insight into that as I'm giving him credit for.

As for how LSU views us, I imagine they are chuckling a bit at our offense so far, and expecting themselves to have a great game defensively.

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49 minutes ago, JMR said:

As far as Steele goes, he'll obviously have a good handle on the strengths/weaknesses of individual defensive players for LSU, and likely a good feel for how Cam Cameron calls a game, tendencies, etc. On Dameyune Craig, one would HOPE Auburn's offensive staff has made changes to signals, etc., but there's no doubt he has a great understanding of how Auburn's offensive plays are constructed, what defensive schemes cancel out certain plays, and so on. I guess the good news is, DC was not a huge part of the offensive planning process at AU, so maybe he doesn't have as much insight into that as I'm giving him credit for.

As for how LSU views us, I imagine they are chuckling a bit at our offense so far, and expecting themselves to have a great game defensively.

Most excellent. We got em right where we want them, right? right? :bricks: 

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I do not think that we lost that much when D. Craig left for LSU. He has not impressed me whatsoever with what is going on with LSU's offense.  At first I thought that we had lost one of our best coaches on offense. I agree that K Steele likely has a good read on Cameron's offensive play calling. I would love to see Monty and Lawson take Fournette out of his zone being that Fournette runs between the tackles.

If we can do this successfully, we will win this game.

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12 hours ago, Richard78 said:

How do we counter the mesh charging scheme that TAMU used successfully?

Let our tackles carry a 9 mm inside their thigh pads. That should slow down the charge.   I'm guessing they have worked on it for sure.  I'm sure LSU learned something from the game film. 

Since I'm up early and working and not happy about it I'm listening to the radio. They just announced that Auburn has the longest losing streak at home to power 5 Conference teams only exceeded by Kansas

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1. Slide protection

2. Roll the pockect

3. Bring in an extra blocker

4. Don't run the zone read with Sean.

 

I vote #4

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