StatTiger

Finishing Drives & Field Position

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  • During the last 25 years of Auburn football, nearly 15 percent of Auburn's offensive possessions have begun on the opponent's side of the field. This season through 4 games, it is only 4 percent, by far the lowest output during the last 25 seasons.
     
  • During the same time period, Auburn has scored on 30 percent of their possessions beginning on their side of the field. Auburn produces a TD drive 23 percent of the time, starting a drive on their side of the field.
     
  • When Auburn starts on the opponent's side of the field, the Tigers have scored 65 percent of the time, including a TD percentage of 46 percent. Cutting the field in half, clearly makes a major difference in the probability of scoring.
     
  • Though the offense has struggled this season, they are No. 2 nationally in generating red zone opportunities against power-5 competition.

 

Percentage of possessions netting at least 40-yards:

2009: 40.3%

2010: 53.0%

2011: 32.1%

2013: 44.8%

2014: 45.2%

2015: 36.5%

2016: 50.0%


Auburn certainly isn't scoring enough and red zone issues have been magnified. A stronger emphasis is now being placed on "finishing" drives. Moving the football is not an issue thus far based on the percentages listed above. The key is finishing drives and generating a short field more frequently than what we have witnessed through four games.
 

How does Auburn shorten the field?

  • Forcing more turnovers would help, something the Auburn defense has struggled with through four games. Auburn is currently No. 106 nationally in forcing turnovers.
     
  • Special teams could chip in with better production in the return game. Auburn is currently No. 73 in punt-return offense and No. 99 in kick-return offense. Auburn's longest punt return this season is 8-yards and their longest kick-return is 34-yards. Last season Auburn finished the season at No. 4 in both KR-Offense and PR-Offense. During the 2015 season, 12.8 percent of Auburn's offensive possessions began on the opponent's side of the field.

 

War Eagle!

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The return game has been somewhat of a surprise to me. Are we facing good coverage teams and just not getting the chances at returns? Or are we just blocking that badly?

I noticed on kickoffs at least that we aren't really running along a crease (if one is even there) and they tend to take the sideline when there is more field (and therefore more opportunity for a missed tackle) to be had without having to run from sideline to sideline.

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Thanks for the stats. We are terrible finishing drives and that needs to get fixed pronto. Things like that could cause teams that have no business  challenging you, an opportunity to beat you. Also, I would love to see the defense make the next step and force turnovers. Can't complain too much though because they have been the highlight o the season, by far.

Edited by DAG
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The O has obviously been effective getting to the RZ, so why the change in philosophy when we arrive inside the 20's?

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Also. that stat showing that we are #2 in the nation against P5 teams in regards to RZ opportunities, tells me that this team WITH SW is a bonafide top 15 team at the very least. Despite what most fans think, We shouldn't be putting the Clemsons and LSUs on a pedestal over us. We have just as much talent as those two, but we aren't executing. 

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4 minutes ago, bigbird said:

The O has obviously been effective getting to the RZ, so why the change in philosophy when we arrive inside the 20's?

Tendencies, play calling, AND execution. When LSU made the goal line stand everyone knew what was happening, but if the O Line doesn't block, AU won't score. 

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2 hours ago, Browning4AU said:

Tendencies, play calling, AND execution. When LSU made the goal line stand everyone knew what was happening, but if the O Line doesn't block, AU won't score. 

Agreed, but it also seems we go to a completely different playbook. Why not try and execute similar plays that you into scoring opportunities 

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44 minutes ago, StatTiger said:
  • Though the offense has struggled this season, they are No. 2 nationally in generating red zone opportunities against power-5 competition.

 

That right there is why I am so danged hopeful for the remainder of this season. Our Tigers correct the mistakes (and maybe get a few better play calls, pass once in a while on something other that 3rd down) and suddenly it's a whole new ball O' wax.  Good times are just ahead!

War Eagle!

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14 minutes ago, bigbird said:

The O has obviously been effective getting to the RZ, so why the change in philosophy when we arrive inside the 20's?

@bigbird Agreed if you don't change personnel, don't change philosophy.  If we're going to change plays in the redzone, we need to change personnel (i.e. if we're going to abandon the pass, just run then get a package for JF3 and put him in, spread them out and make them tackle people in space.  If you're going to stay with Sean, then put some athletic, big receivers in and let them make some plays one on one.  

Please stop clustering everyone up on the LOS and then giving it to the RB with no deception and no chance to score if we miss a block.

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When you change personell you give yourself away but we ain't fooling nobody as is so I'm for it. I would prefer to get better passing it. But I'll take whatever works. 

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1 minute ago, alexava said:

When you change personell you give yourself away but we ain't fooling nobody as is so I'm for it. I would prefer to get better passing it. But I'll take whatever works. 

I wish they will kill the wildcat. At this point, you might as well have JF3 back there. At the very least he has .000000001 % chance to throw with this coaching staff. By putting KJ back there, you have just completely given yourselves away. 

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14 minutes ago, bigbird said:

The O has obviously been effective getting to the RZ, so why the change in philosophy when we arrive inside the 20's?

The field shrinks is what I've always been told, which means the defense is not stretched near so far vertically and otherwise just has less space to cover as the boundaries become their ally.  

If our Tigers just clean up a few mistakes, miss a couple of fewer blocks and/or give our QB a fraction of two of a second more time to operate and points start coming in bunches. #2 in generating red zone opportunities against Power-5 competition after facing  the likes of top ten Clemson with DC Bruce Venables, or John The Chief" Chavez's defense against top ten aTm, not to mention Dave Aranda's defensive unit at LSU in three of the first four games is pretty impressive.  Wondering which team generates more opportunities and what kind of opposition they have played...

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If i were stupidly put in charge, I would risk an interception by Johnson throwing out of the wildcat if for no other reason than to give the defense pause the following time Auburn lined up in that formation. And who knows, it might completed for a td. Something similar to the jump pass Tebow through years ago. 

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1 hour ago, CleCoTiger said:

The field shrinks is what I've always been told, which means the defense is not stretched near so far vertically and otherwise just has less space to cover as the boundaries become their ally.  

If our Tigers just clean up a few mistakes, miss a couple of fewer blocks and/or give our QB a fraction of two of a second more time to operate and points start coming in bunches. #2 in generating red zone opportunities against Power-5 competition after facing  the likes of top ten Clemson with DC Bruce Venables, or John The Chief" Chavez's defense against top ten aTm, not to mention Dave Aranda's defensive unit at LSU in three of the first four games is pretty impressive.  Wondering which team generates more opportunities and what kind of opposition they have played...

All our success passing is long developing plays. We don't have any quick hitters we need. 

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29 minutes ago, alexava said:

All our success passing is long developing plays. We don't have any quick hitters we need. 

Bubble screens???????????????????? aren't quick hitters:poke:

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Just now, augolf1716 said:

Bubble screens???????????????????? aren't quick hitters:poke:

Yea just not successful. We don't have enough room to fake the sweep hide the ball and beat double coverage deep. 

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I don't know why but it really seems we never have a chance to return because someone is around the return man at the point of catch.  Unless we aren't blocking the gunners.

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Has this team forgot how to score touchdowns? Or has this staff forgot how to teach them on how to score touchdowns. It sure seems like it since we couldn't punch it in against LSU on their 1 yard line.

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2 hours ago, alexava said:

All our success passing is long developing plays. We don't have any quick hitters we need. 

I dunno about that. Just because we haven't seen much (at least in the way of slants and such if that's what you're referring to, 'cause we already run more than a few bubble screens -- maybe you should tell me what you mean by "quick hitters"?) doesn't mean they aren't in the playbook. 

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1 hour ago, AUBwins said:

I don't know why but it really seems we never have a chance to return because someone is around the return man at the point of catch.  Unless we aren't blocking the gunners.

Stat- I would like to know how many punts & kick-offs we have returned, I don't remember many of them; I do remember Johnathon Ford had a chance to return a kick-off and misplayed it and it went through the end-zone.

 

 

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5 hours ago, StatTiger said:
  •  
  • Though the offense has struggled this season, they are No. 2 nationally in generating red zone opportunities against power-5 competition.

Is this ranked by season total quantity or per game avg? Just curious since we have played 3 power-5 teams and I'm sure many teams have only played 2 so far. Very positive stat either way.

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42 minutes ago, CleCoTiger said:

I dunno about that. Just because we haven't seen much (at least in the way of slants and such if that's what you're referring to, 'cause we already run more than a few bubble screens -- maybe you should tell me what you mean by "quick hitters"?) doesn't mean they aren't in the playbook. 

Bubble screens rarely gain much and hardly ever gain in the red zone. By quick hitters I do mean slants shallow crosses hell a bammer type pick is ok with me. These plays require a snap quick read and get the ball out quick. That is tough. It requires a good call so the throw is there and Sean to have a lane to throw it. He is 6' tall and there are 5 olinemen and ideally 4 dlinemen averaging 6'4" jumping up and down waving arms between him and the target. I think he has these plays called but holds on because it's either not there or he can't see it. He has to slide laterally to find an opening and the windows close.  So we try the rollout. It didn't work next time it might. I assume they didn't roll him to his right to avoid giving Carlson that bad angle? We have to scheme better, throw better catch better and block better.  No one area gets all the blame. I am encouraged by how we get there though. 

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1 hour ago, alexava said:

Bubble screens rarely gain much and hardly ever gain in the red zone. By quick hitters I do mean slants shallow crosses...

I wanna see 'em too. And I was pretty sure that's the kind of thing you meant. I'm certain they're in the playbook and like I said, I wanna see 'em too!

On edit...

I also think you and I love bubble screens down close in the red zone just about equally.  (I love 'em about like I love ingrown toenails myself.)

Edited by CleCoTiger

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