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Jeremy Johnson: 'It was my fault' "UPDATED"

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'It was my fault': Jeremy Johnson reflects on Auburn career, looks to future

James Crepea | jcrepea@al.com

Jeremy Johnson was supposed to be the main attraction of pro day at Auburn.

The former Tigers quarterback was tabbed for a stellar career in which he won individual acclaim and etched his name in Auburn record books, but those lofty aspirations and projections fell dramatically short.

Johnson candidly owned up to his shortcomings.

"It was my fault," said Johnson, who lost the starting job after three games in 2015 and had 312 passing yards with a touchdown and two interceptions last season. "That is what it is and I leave it at that. The past is the past. Whatever questions I'm asked I'm going to answer it truthfully and I'm not here to bash nobody because it was my fault as well.

"I love coach (Gus) Malzahn, love coach (Rhett) Lashlee, they did a great job. I love being around the players. It's a new beginning now. ... The most important thing was being a man of integrity. I fell like what I've been through helped me become a man and mature me."

On Friday, Johnson got his major opportunity to show his talents before representatives from all 32 NFL teams.

Gus Malzahn felt his longest-serving quarterback at the college level had a good showing.

"Jeremy is, I think, a young man with a great family," Malzahn said. "Jeremy's had his ups and downs but he hung in there. I think that will carry him a long way in life. He's got great character, he's a great worker and I thought he performed well today."

Johnson felt like himself for the first time in a long time after throwing to former teammates Marcus Davis and Tony Stevens.

"Last night I kind of just sat back and thought about life and letting the butterflies get out," Johnson said. "Not that (nervous); it was just another day of throwing and catching, trying to showcase your talent. ... I faced a lot of adversity here, but I'm back to myself. A new era, a new beginning. I'm just looking forward to what's next in my life."

The Montgomery native had a 31.5-inch vertical jump, 9-foot-6 broad jump with unofficial 4.68-second 40-yard dash.

He's been working with quarterback coach Tom Shaw in Orlando, Fla. and been alongside former Texas A&M quarterback Trevor Knight, Dallas Cowboys star Dak Prescott and Tampa Bay Buccaneers quarterback Jameis Winston.

Johnson wanted to show he could be an effective pocket passer and pro-style quarterback if a team gives him the opportunity.

"Coming out of high school, I was coached, but I never had a quarterback coach," he said. "(At Auburn) the situation was what it was. ... I just need to be coached up a little more. Getting that chance to be with Jameis and Dak and coach Shaw, they taught me a lot. All I need to do is get into, whatever team picks me up, the right system, get behind a veteran.

"I'm willing to sit out, learn, grow and whenever I get my chance take advantage of my opportunity."

Edited by aubiefifty
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27 minutes ago, auburnphan said:

JJ never had a real QB Coach, pretty much what he is saying without saying it

He sat behind Marshall for two years. Then relieved an injured younger qb for the next two. Even if it is proven the coaching was subpar, he was out performed by lesser talent. Better coaching would have likely benefited all the QBs. Still keeping him on the sidelines. It is what it is and I hope he does well in what ever he does. 

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Hard to believe his first half against Arkansas in the 2014 season opener was the high point of his career. It was obvious our QB coaching left a lot to be desired and he apparently knew little about reading defenses. Hopefully, if he gets to move to the next level he will get the coaching he needs. Regardless, I wish him the best.

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2 hours ago, alexava said:

He sat behind Marshall for two years. Then relieved an injured younger qb for the next two. Even if it is proven the coaching was subpar, he was out performed by lesser talent. Better coaching would have likely benefited all the QBs. Still keeping him on the sidelines. It is what it is and I hope he does well in what ever he does. 

LOL, keep spinning.  SW's best QB coaching has not come from Gus/Lashlee.  JJ did not have the benefit of a better than average QB coach at AU.  Hopefully, since Gus' ass will be fired if we put up another season like every season since 2013, Gus has realized his own shortcomings. 

 

wde

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5 hours ago, AUIH1 said:

LOL, keep spinning.  SW's best QB coaching has not come from Gus/Lashlee.  JJ did not have the benefit of a better than average QB coach at AU.  Hopefully, since Gus' ass will be fired if we put up another season like every season since 2013, Gus has realized his own shortcomings. 

 

wde

Lol. Spinning.   

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Be some story if JJ goes on and has future in the pros. great kid and humble as they come. 

end of the day Nick Marshall was great fit in the situation at hand. I would love another like him.

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montgomeryadvertiser.com
 

Jeremy Johnson thinks he ‘caught a few eyes’ in his Pro Day workout

Matthew Stevens , Montgomery Advertiser

AUBURN – For the first time in years, Jeremy Johnson stood in the middle of Auburn’s indoor practice facility with a smile on his face.

The former Auburn quarterback, who started 11 games and notably lost the starting role in a public manner two seasons ago, threw passes at Auburn’s Pro Day workout exemplifying the potential his alma mater saw in him four years ago as a recruit.

While hoping the past simply didn’t matter anymore and the present of his ability would impress just one professional franchise in getting him a training camp invitation, Johnson said he felt happy to be on an Auburn field for the first time in a long while.

“It’s been a minute,” Johnson said. “I faced a lot of adversity here, but I’m back to myself. A new era, a new beginning. I’m just looking forward to what’s next in my life.”

With no defense in front of him, Johnson showed velocity, touch and accuracy while throwing route tree passes to wide receivers Tony Stevens and Marcus Davis Friday while hoping NFL scouts would see the present and forget the past.

“I feel good where I’m at. I think I caught a few eyes,” Johnson said. “With this deal, it’s all about catching one eye. I feel like I caught a couple eyes and a lot of guys are going to be in touch with me.”

Johnson, who measured just above 6-foot-4 and 232 pounds, ran the 40-yard dash twice with his best mark being an unofficial 4.68 seconds. He also recorded a 9-foot-6 broad jump and a 31.5-inch vertical leap.
Johnson spent the last few months working in Orlando with quarterbacks coach Tom Shaw, who has trained NFL stars Tom Brady and Peyton Manning, and the time in Florida helped him work on throwing mechanics to possibly so more accuracy in drills similar to Friday.

“Coach Shaw taught me a different way of holding the ball, keeping space under the palm of my hand that changed the way the ball came out and as far as following through,” Johnson said. “Being accurate, that’s all he preached on. “Coming out of high school, I was coached, but I never had a quarterback coach and here the situation was what it was. I appreciate them for giving me the opportunity. I love Coach Malzahn and Coach Lashlee.”

Stevens, who was his first receiving target in the passing drills, said he immediately returned to that connection the pair had when they formed a pitch-and-catch duo in their true freshman season.

Johnson started 11 games at Auburn and played in 30 career games during his roller coast four-year career that included 2,224 passing yards, 20 touchdown passes and nine more touchdowns on the ground.

“I thought he did good today,” Stevens said. “It was nice to see him back here was a smile on his face spinning the ball like we all know he’s capable of. We’re all at different places training and I hadn’t seen him in months but he’s always going to have that connection with me.”

CLOSE

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Auburn QB Jeremy Johnson after his Pro Day workouts Matthew Stevens

In front of representatives of all 32 NFL teams Friday, Johnson tried to prove his arm talent would be enough to be part of professional football at some level.

However, he also knew that while standing in Auburn’s indoor practice facility for likely the last time, Johnson finally felt comfortable talking about some of his shortcomings in his college career.

"It was my fault," Johnson said. “Whatever questions I'm asked I'm going to answer it truthfully and I'm not here to bash nobody because it was my fault as well.”

Some of those questions obviously entail Johnson, who started Auburn’s final two regular season games in 2016, discussing what led to the six interceptions that Johnson threw in the first three games of the 2015 season leading to Sean White getting the starting nod over him following an embarrassing 45-21 loss at LSU.

The “adversity” Johnson referred to Friday continued in 2016 when in the same week he was told he wouldn’t be the starting quarterback for the season opener against No. 2 Clemson, Johnson’s grandfather was tragically killed in a car accident. Johnson still participated in practice while dealing with the grief of losing a trusted and loving family member and was involved in the three-quarterback game plan against Clemson. In the 19-13 home loss to Clemson, Johnson tossed a critical interception among the six attempted passes and was stuffed on a fourth down conversion. After those plays, the familiar boos at Jordan-Hare Stadium cascaded down. The “storm” that Malzahn said Johnson had passed through was back again as he took a confidence dip in the 2016 season opener.

As he addressed questions Friday about the first quarterback he signed at Auburn, Malzahn had a noticeably different tone and demeanor when talking about the Montgomery native.

“Jeremy is, I think, a young man with a great family. Jeremy's had his ups and downs but he hung in there,” Malzahn said. “I think that will carry him a long way in life. He's got great character, he's a great worker and I thought he performed well today.”

One of things that the former Carver High School star already carries with him is a bachelor’s degree in Interdisciplinary University Studies from Auburn that he earned last semester. Despite not having a ‘SEC graduates’ patch on his jersey at the 2017 Sugar Bowl loss to Oklahoma, Johnson is listed on Auburn’s alumni website as an official graduate.

“I love Auburn. I’m an Auburn man. I appreciate the opportunity,” Johnson said. ““It felt good to be out here again for the last time with my fellow teammates.”

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Can someone please explain how the phrase "it's been a minute" became popular? I take it that it means it's been a while. Sorry, I'm older and just don't get why some phrases catch on like they do. Maybe George Costanza's opposite theory is a factor.:dunno:

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8 hours ago, gr82be said:

Can someone please explain how the phrase "it's been a minute" became popular? I take it that it means it's been a while. Sorry, I'm older and just don't get why some phrases catch on like they do. Maybe George Costanza's opposite theory is a factor.:dunno:

I don't know about how it became popular, but I think it's a shortened version of "a hot minute." How that became popular, I'm not sure either. 

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23 hours ago, aubiefifty said:

 “Coming out of high school, I was coached, but I never had a quarterback coach and here the situation was what it was. I appreciate them for giving me the opportunity. I love Coach Malzahn and Coach Lashlee.”

YEP

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So based on some JJ has no accountability ..I love the kid he is from my hometown but I don't think Gus or Rhett told him to throw it directly to the other team, or let his own feet tackle him, or not protect the  ball in the pocket....he has talent I just think it's mental, he get scared out there. I mean he had several chances at redemption to prove everyone wrong but he still made the same big mistake...throwing the ball to the other team....and the defensive player did not have to work hard all they had to do was stand there and catch it.

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20 minutes ago, PoetTiger said:

So based on some JJ has no accountability ..I love the kid he is from my hometown but I don't think Gus or Rhett told him to throw it directly to the other team, or let his own feet tackle him, or not protect the  ball in the pocket....he has talent I just think it's mental, he get scared out there. I mean he had several chances at redemption to prove everyone wrong but he still made the same big mistake...throwing the ball to the other team....and the defensive player did not have to work hard all they had to do was stand there and catch it.

Bad news: I continue to believe that unless you have a freak athlete in Gus's system, QBs will look underdeveloped in this league. It it not one thing, it is a composite of things. We run the ball 70% of the time, allowing teams to continuously stack the box and press receivers.  We don't use the tight end, allowing teams to double other receivers. Receivers aren't thrown to and become rusty and show poor hands. And our route tree is way too predictable.  All that makes it almost impossible for a QB to thrive  

Good news: OC Lindsey has the ability and weapons to change all of that and make our offense super tough to defend.  If Gus stays out of his way, we will be potent in 2017!

 

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28 minutes ago, PoetTiger said:

So based on some JJ has no accountability ..I love the kid he is from my hometown but I don't think Gus or Rhett told him to throw it directly to the other team, or let his own feet tackle him, or not protect the  ball in the pocket....he has talent I just think it's mental, he get scared out there. I mean he had several chances at redemption to prove everyone wrong but he still made the same big mistake...throwing the ball to the other team....and the defensive player did not have to work hard all they had to do was stand there and catch it.

Eh, if he was never coached to be levels higher than his high-school level, then that's exactly what happens... poor mechanics and decisions. 300lb future NFL players wanting to rip your face off is a little different than the laid back play of high-school. That's why there seem to be 47 coaches on a team.

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14 hours ago, Barnacle said:

I don't know about how it became popular, but I think it's a shortened version of "a hot minute." How that became popular, I'm not sure either. 

Thanks

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2 hours ago, Gowebb11 said:

Bad news: I continue to believe that unless you have a freak athlete in Gus's system, QBs will look underdeveloped in this league. It it not one thing, it is a composite of things. We run the ball 70% of the time, allowing teams to continuously stack the box and press receivers.  We don't use the tight end, allowing teams to double other receivers. Receivers aren't thrown to and become rusty and show poor hands. And our route tree is way too predictable.  All that makes it almost impossible for a QB to thrive  

Good news: OC Lindsey has the ability and weapons to change all of that and make our offense super tough to defend.  If Gus stays out of his way, we will be potent in 2017!

 

if JJ had lost the job to a "freak athlete" i could agree. He lost if to a less talented and less experienced, younger qb. one that looked fairly good when healthy. 

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2 hours ago, alexava said:

if JJ had lost the job to a "freak athlete" i could agree. He lost if to a less talented and less experienced, younger qb. one that looked fairly good when healthy. 

You're right, and our offense continued to be far less than the Malzahn offenses of Newton and Marshall. My point is QBs in that system will continue to be limited until we become less predictable and use all of our athletes. . I believe CCL will do that if Gus steps back and lets him. WDE

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I think so many go with what ever beat it is....but I guess not living up to expectations opens the door for a lot of criticism, some fair some not. Gus with all his perceived stubbornness, etc., still has led some of if not the most prolific offenses in Auburn history. I personally don't think JJ had it upstairs, and he just put way too much pressure on himself. The inexcusable turnovers were his biggest problem. He threw some picks and he was not being pressured at all..clean pocket and everything. There were times he looked scared as crap out there. I mean they teach you in HS to throw it away and not to the other team. As for route trees I had not seen that word around here until one of Auburn's WRS vying for an NFL roster was criticized for coming from this offense. Now everyone is a route tree expert and want to question routes in this offense. No one was questioning route trees in 2010 or 2013 cause AU was winning. As for Gus, his hands will be on this offense...Chip may have the keys but Gus is riding shotgun for sure. It's wishful thinking to believe he will not. 

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6 hours ago, Gowebb11 said:

Bad news: I continue to believe that unless you have a freak athlete in Gus's system, QBs will look underdeveloped in this league. It it not one thing, it is a composite of things. We run the ball 70% of the time, allowing teams to continuously stack the box and press receivers.  We don't use the tight end, allowing teams to double other receivers. Receivers aren't thrown to and become rusty and show poor hands. And our route tree is way too predictable.  All that makes it almost impossible for a QB to thrive  

Good news: OC Lindsey has the ability and weapons to change all of that and make our offense super tough to defend.  If Gus stays out of his way, we will be potent in 2017!

 

Sean White, Chris Todd, Paul Smith and others were freak athletes?

Sean White - 

Sean White is backing up his reputation as the steady hand to lead Auburn's offense by being remarkably efficient.

The redshirt-sophomore leads the SEC in completion percentage (68.5) and passer efficiency (159.0), ranking eighth and twelfth nationally, respectively.

Chris Todd - 

AUBURN, Ala. -- Auburn quarterback Chris Todd set the school's single-season record with his 21st touchdown pass of the season.

Todd set the record with his second TD pass of the day, a 72-yard bomb to Darvin Adamsearly in the second quarter. He came in one behind the record set by Pat Sullivan in 1971 and tied by Jason Campbell five years ago.

Todd tied the mark with a 1-yarder to Eric Smith in the first quarter.

Auburn managed a total of seven touchdown passes last season, but Todd has thrived in Gus Malzahn's offense.

Paul Smith -

With Malzahn running the Golden Hurricane offense, Smith passed for 5,065 yards and 47 touchdowns. He finished second in yards and touchdowns to Texas Tech’s Graham Harrell and was named the Conference USA Player of the Year.

Smith also set—and still holds—the NCAA record for most games gaining 300 yards or more with 14.

David Johnson - 

Malzahn’s second quarterback at Tulsa, David Johnson, was a Davey O’Brien semifinalist in 2008.

Johnson went 258-of-400 for 4,059 yards, 46 touchdowns and 18 interceptions as a senior in ’08. His quarterback rating of 178.7 was second only to Oklahoma’s Sam Bradford.

Ryan Aplin - 

Ryan Aplin was the starting quarterback at Arkansas State during Malzahn’s single season as the Red Wolves’ head coach.

As a senior in 2012, Aplin went 276-of-406 (68 percent) for 3,342 yards, 24 touchdowns and only four interceptions. His completion percentage ranked No. 10 in the FBS.

He led Arkansas State to a 10-3 finish, including a second straight conference title and the first bowl win in program history.

Aplin earned Sun Belt player of the year honors in both 2011 and 2012 and just finished his first season as an administrative intern with Ole Miss.

 

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50 minutes ago, AU-24 said:

Sean White, Chris Todd, Paul Smith and others were freak athletes?

Sean White - 

Sean White is backing up his reputation as the steady hand to lead Auburn's offense by being remarkably efficient.

The redshirt-sophomore leads the SEC in completion percentage (68.5) and passer efficiency (159.0), ranking eighth and twelfth nationally, respectively.

Chris Todd - 

AUBURN, Ala. -- Auburn quarterback Chris Todd set the school's single-season record with his 21st touchdown pass of the season.

Todd set the record with his second TD pass of the day, a 72-yard bomb to Darvin Adamsearly in the second quarter. He came in one behind the record set by Pat Sullivan in 1971 and tied by Jason Campbell five years ago.

Todd tied the mark with a 1-yarder to Eric Smith in the first quarter.

Auburn managed a total of seven touchdown passes last season, but Todd has thrived in Gus Malzahn's offense.

Paul Smith -

With Malzahn running the Golden Hurricane offense, Smith passed for 5,065 yards and 47 touchdowns. He finished second in yards and touchdowns to Texas Tech’s Graham Harrell and was named the Conference USA Player of the Year.

Smith also set—and still holds—the NCAA record for most games gaining 300 yards or more with 14.

David Johnson - 

Malzahn’s second quarterback at Tulsa, David Johnson, was a Davey O’Brien semifinalist in 2008.

Johnson went 258-of-400 for 4,059 yards, 46 touchdowns and 18 interceptions as a senior in ’08. His quarterback rating of 178.7 was second only to Oklahoma’s Sam Bradford.

Ryan Aplin - 

Ryan Aplin was the starting quarterback at Arkansas State during Malzahn’s single season as the Red Wolves’ head coach.

As a senior in 2012, Aplin went 276-of-406 (68 percent) for 3,342 yards, 24 touchdowns and only four interceptions. His completion percentage ranked No. 10 in the FBS.

He led Arkansas State to a 10-3 finish, including a second straight conference title and the first bowl win in program history.

Aplin earned Sun Belt player of the year honors in both 2011 and 2012 and just finished his first season as an administrative intern with Ole Miss.

 

But............ they were already developed. and playing weaker defense, and........ on and on. recruiting has been the problem, and i think that was bad luck(or evaluation) as much as development. 

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Let me know when GM wins 10 or more games at Auburn without his QB rushing for over 1000 yards.

And yes, I hope it's next year with Stidham.

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I think we should all be proud to have had an individual like Jeremy at Auburn. I know he's not proud of what he was able to produce in his time with the program. Nonetheless, he has very special athletic talents and a great head on his shoulders. Jason Campbell comes to mind. A few different bounces of the oblong spheroid and Jeremy might have been considered without question for an NFL roster. 

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14 hours ago, AU-24 said:

Sean White, Chris Todd, Paul Smith and others were freak athletes?

Sean White - 

Sean White is backing up his reputation as the steady hand to lead Auburn's offense by being remarkably efficient.

The redshirt-sophomore leads the SEC in completion percentage (68.5) and passer efficiency (159.0), ranking eighth and twelfth nationally, respectively.

Chris Todd - 

AUBURN, Ala. -- Auburn quarterback Chris Todd set the school's single-season record with his 21st touchdown pass of the season.

Todd set the record with his second TD pass of the day, a 72-yard bomb to Darvin Adamsearly in the second quarter. He came in one behind the record set by Pat Sullivan in 1971 and tied by Jason Campbell five years ago.

Todd tied the mark with a 1-yarder to Eric Smith in the first quarter.

Auburn managed a total of seven touchdown passes last season, but Todd has thrived in Gus Malzahn's offense.

Paul Smith -

With Malzahn running the Golden Hurricane offense, Smith passed for 5,065 yards and 47 touchdowns. He finished second in yards and touchdowns to Texas Tech’s Graham Harrell and was named the Conference USA Player of the Year.

Smith also set—and still holds—the NCAA record for most games gaining 300 yards or more with 14.

David Johnson - 

Malzahn’s second quarterback at Tulsa, David Johnson, was a Davey O’Brien semifinalist in 2008.

Johnson went 258-of-400 for 4,059 yards, 46 touchdowns and 18 interceptions as a senior in ’08. His quarterback rating of 178.7 was second only to Oklahoma’s Sam Bradford.

Ryan Aplin - 

Ryan Aplin was the starting quarterback at Arkansas State during Malzahn’s single season as the Red Wolves’ head coach.

As a senior in 2012, Aplin went 276-of-406 (68 percent) for 3,342 yards, 24 touchdowns and only four interceptions. His completion percentage ranked No. 10 in the FBS.

He led Arkansas State to a 10-3 finish, including a second straight conference title and the first bowl win in program history.

Aplin earned Sun Belt player of the year honors in both 2011 and 2012 and just finished his first season as an administrative intern with Ole Miss.

 

Good points,all. Note my original post specified "in this league".  I'm not impressed by Conference USA or Sunbelt records. Chris Todd put up good numbers for an 8-5 team as has Sean. They are good QBs, Newton and Marshall competed for championships because they were able to overcome some of the shortcomings many of us believe exists in our scheme and play calling. You and I may see things differently, but hopefully we agree that this is a good time to hand the reins to CCL and get back to playing for titles. WDE

Edited by Gowebb11
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On 3/12/2017 at 0:02 PM, gr82be said:

Can someone please explain how the phrase "it's been a minute" became popular? I take it that it means it's been a while. Sorry, I'm older and just don't get why some phrases catch on like they do. Maybe George Costanza's opposite theory is a factor.:dunno:

off topic but yeah, it's downplaying the total amount of something that has been spent, used, or passed in an ironic or sarcastic way to emphasis that it has felt much longer for the person.

 

BTW, it's not new... this was said constantly in the 90's and 00's.

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6 hours ago, Mims44 said:

off topic but yeah, it's downplaying the total amount of something that has been spent, used, or passed in an ironic or sarcastic way to emphasis that it has felt much longer for the person.

 

BTW, it's not new... this was said constantly in the 90's and 00's.

Thanks. I never heard it until the past year or so. 

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