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TigerOne

No Excuse Game #2, LSU

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On 10/10/2017 at 5:21 PM, DAG said:

It’s been said countless of times, yet the same people keep coming up with bull crap narratives. Most of us knew we would beat Ole Miss, Miss State, Mizzou, etc. AU should always be able to beat those teams unless they have some sort of extraordinary player. Those are standards built by Auburn’s recent success. If you can’t handle that, please, go support UK or someone like that, who is content with staying in the game. 

Most of us also said the games he will be judged on are LSU, UGA, and Bama. I don’t care if we beat those teams by 1 or 100. You need to at the very least be splitting with those teams to hit the next level. Whether it be recruiting, national recognition or on-field success. 

Lastly, you need to play 60 minutes with intensity. That is what separates great teams from good teams. Complacency isn’t an option. I don’t care if you are playing the 1st string or 4th string. That needs to be the mentality. If you have a team down, you take they will. It’s up to them to stop you. 

 

Bingo my friend. We have the capability to throttle teams, but we don't. We get relaxed and vanilla and it doesn't do us any favors. It also strains the hell out of defense imo. If the game is in hand, put the 2nd and 3rd string in and get them some experience running to playbook outside of dive left or right.

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Something I just saw.. in 3 of the last 4 games, LSU has given up at least 194 yards rushing. Feed. KJ. 

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Probably not worth its own thread, and only sort'a, kind'a, a little relevant here, but

Cluelessness on my part? Or is Mr. Ferguson’s analysis of our pace surprising to others?

“Alright, let’s run some numbers here. The best way to measure offensive pace using stats is average time between plays — that is, total time of possession divided by number of plays run. This is how that looks so far in the Gus Malzahn era:

YEAR

POSSESSION

PLAYS

AVG. BETWEEN PLAYS

2013

425:14

1,014

25.2 seconds

2014

388:25

939

24.8 seconds

2015

368:43

892

24.8 seconds

2016

379:21

934

24.4 seconds

2017

182:57 (6 games)

427

25.7 seconds

So while it may seem like Auburn isn’t going as quickly as it used to, the difference between this year’s team and others under Malzahn is thin — 1.3 between 2016 and 2017 being the biggest gap. Auburn is only a half-second slower this season than it was in 2013.

For comparison, according to Football Study Hall, 1.3 seconds was the difference between the 10th-fastest (Oregon) and 17th-fastest (Clemson) last season. Those are two of the most well-known no-huddle offenses in college football.

One of the aspects of Lindsey’s offense that stood out to me in the first half of the season was how the Tigers immediately went tempo after a big play. That’s been a hallmark of this attack, no matter if the huge yards came through the air or on the ground.

I think Auburn might be slightly more prone to changing up personnel packages after minimal gains this season than it was last season. Lindsey likes to keep defenses on its toes, and part of that comes with rotating different sets. But when Auburn is moving the ball effectively this season, it’s still up-tempo.”

https://www.seccountry.com/auburn/auburn-football-mailbag-lsu-preview-offense

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19 hours ago, AUld fAUx@ said:

Probably not worth its own thread, and only sort'a, kind'a, a little relevant here, but

Cluelessness on my part? Or is Mr. Ferguson’s analysis of our pace surprising to others?

“Alright, let’s run some numbers here. The best way to measure offensive pace using stats is average time between plays — that is, total time of possession divided by number of plays run. This is how that looks so far in the Gus Malzahn era:

YEAR

POSSESSION

PLAYS

AVG. BETWEEN PLAYS

2013

425:14

1,014

25.2 seconds

2014

388:25

939

24.8 seconds

2015

368:43

892

24.8 seconds

2016

379:21

934

24.4 seconds

2017

182:57 (6 games)

427

25.7 seconds

So while it may seem like Auburn isn’t going as quickly as it used to, the difference between this year’s team and others under Malzahn is thin — 1.3 between 2016 and 2017 being the biggest gap. Auburn is only a half-second slower this season than it was in 2013.

For comparison, according to Football Study Hall, 1.3 seconds was the difference between the 10th-fastest (Oregon) and 17th-fastest (Clemson) last season. Those are two of the most well-known no-huddle offenses in college football.

One of the aspects of Lindsey’s offense that stood out to me in the first half of the season was how the Tigers immediately went tempo after a big play. That’s been a hallmark of this attack, no matter if the huge yards came through the air or on the ground.

I think Auburn might be slightly more prone to changing up personnel packages after minimal gains this season than it was last season. Lindsey likes to keep defenses on its toes, and part of that comes with rotating different sets. But when Auburn is moving the ball effectively this season, it’s still up-tempo.”

https://www.seccountry.com/auburn/auburn-football-mailbag-lsu-preview-offense

I wonder how this compares to 2009 and 2010 Gus offenses. Interesting that we were even faster in '16 and '17 than '13.

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This should not be a close game. That's what I expect. We are just better. Much better. The only way I see this close is if we have a turnover frenzy like weve had before this season. Other seasons, I would not be as confident as I am because we havent had D like we have. If we take care of ourselves, we win handily, regardless of what LSU does - but thats why you play the game. Stranger things have happened.

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20 hours ago, AUld fAUx@ said:

Probably not worth its own thread, and only sort'a, kind'a, a little relevant here, but

Cluelessness on my part? Or is Mr. Ferguson’s analysis of our pace surprising to others?

“Alright, let’s run some numbers here. The best way to measure offensive pace using stats is average time between plays — that is, total time of possession divided by number of plays run. This is how that looks so far in the Gus Malzahn era:

YEAR

POSSESSION

PLAYS

AVG. BETWEEN PLAYS

2013

425:14

1,014

25.2 seconds

2014

388:25

939

24.8 seconds

2015

368:43

892

24.8 seconds

2016

379:21

934

24.4 seconds

2017

182:57 (6 games)

427

25.7 seconds

So while it may seem like Auburn isn’t going as quickly as it used to, the difference between this year’s team and others under Malzahn is thin — 1.3 between 2016 and 2017 being the biggest gap. Auburn is only a half-second slower this season than it was in 2013.

For comparison, according to Football Study Hall, 1.3 seconds was the difference between the 10th-fastest (Oregon) and 17th-fastest (Clemson) last season. Those are two of the most well-known no-huddle offenses in college football.

One of the aspects of Lindsey’s offense that stood out to me in the first half of the season was how the Tigers immediately went tempo after a big play. That’s been a hallmark of this attack, no matter if the huge yards came through the air or on the ground.

I think Auburn might be slightly more prone to changing up personnel packages after minimal gains this season than it was last season. Lindsey likes to keep defenses on its toes, and part of that comes with rotating different sets. But when Auburn is moving the ball effectively this season, it’s still up-tempo.”

https://www.seccountry.com/auburn/auburn-football-mailbag-lsu-preview-offense

I think the difference this year as in years past is in the way it looks.  From what I have read is in previous years both Gus and Chip looked at the defense then had to discuss what each saw then call a play. Usually we ran up to the line and then held the formation until the play came in. I'm  surprised that they were able to get to the pace they did doing it that way.  I thin with Chip he is assessing the defense on his own for the most part and then calling the play.  It seems like there is less time between getting up to the line and snapping the ball than in previous years.  Overall yes it may average out to close to the same amount of time per play but it looks very different.

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21 hours ago, McFU said:

I think the difference this year as in years past is in the way it looks.  From what I have read is in previous years both Gus and Chip looked at the defense then had to discuss what each saw then call a play. Usually we ran up to the line and then held the formation until the play came in. I'm  surprised that they were able to get to the pace they did doing it that way.  I thin with Chip he is assessing the defense on his own for the most part and then calling the play.  It seems like there is less time between getting up to the line and snapping the ball than in previous years.  Overall yes it may average out to close to the same amount of time per play but it looks very different.

Might be it, and it sure does.

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Stupidity is not an excuse.

Auburn coaches gave the game away..again.

Never seen a team try and run the clock out starting in the second quarter until yesterday.

Auburn coaches continue to not use all of its playmakers.

Sitting on the bench is not an excuse.. its stupidity

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5 minutes ago, AUDynasty said:

We've come full circle.

There's no excuses not to fire Gus.

sad thing is today Gus probably doesn't see anything wrong with the gameplan. He will say its just execution, well that's true all of the time.

Bet there is no blame by any of the coaches its just lets get back to work guys its ok.

 

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On 10/10/2017 at 6:21 PM, DAG said:

It’s been said countless of times, yet the same people keep coming up with bull crap narratives. Most of us knew we would beat Ole Miss, Miss State, Mizzou, etc. AU should always be able to beat those teams unless they have some sort of extraordinary player. Those are standards built by Auburn’s recent success. If you can’t handle that, please, go support UK or someone like that, who is content with staying in the game. 

Most of us also said the games he will be judged on are LSU, UGA, and Bama. I don’t care if we beat those teams by 1 or 100. You need to at the very least be splitting with those teams to hit the next level. Whether it be recruiting, national recognition or on-field success. 

Lastly, you need to play 60 minutes with intensity. That is what separates great teams from good teams. Complacency isn’t an option. I don’t care if you are playing the 1st string or 4th string. That needs to be the mentality. If you have a team down, you take they will. It’s up to them to stop you. 

 

The post of the year. This rings more true now the dust has settled in.

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