AUDub

safety CJ Harris ineligible

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A player battling epilepsy will not be able to play as a walk-on safety at Auburn because he uses a prescription for cannabis oil to combat his illness, according to WXGA-TV.

C.J. Harris was diagnosed with epilepsy as a sophomore in high school, and after his 14th seizure he was prescribed cannabis oil by his doctor, which has allowed him to live a seizure-free life since January 20, 2017.

*sigh* 

Where to begin...

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This is effin BS to the highest degree. Guess NCAA does not want their athletes to get the help they need..........  Just wow.

Edited by GwillMac6
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Just came here to post this. This is some bs dude. The NCAA loves to show us how much they suck at times. 

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1 minute ago, GwillMac6 said:

This is effin BS to the highest degree. Guess NCAA does not want their athletes to be healthy.......... 

The NCAA doesn’t want anything to benefit the athlete other than what’s in their pocket. 

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17 minutes ago, AUDub said:

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*sigh* 

Where to begin...

Please forgive my ignorance, but

would state of Ala. have allowed even if NCAA did?

Either way, sucks.

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If this story is true as written, I hope Auburn goes to bat for him. 

Edited by AUDub

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Sounds like a terrible decision if it’s used for medical purposes.

but for the kids sake why if you have epilepsy would you want to take extra blows to the head and cause more trauma.  It may be a blessing in disguise for him as far as long term quality of life.  

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3 minutes ago, corchjay said:

Sounds like a terrible decision if it’s used for medical purposes.

but for the kids sake why if you have epilepsy would you want to take extra blows to the head and cause more trauma.  It may be a blessing in disguise for him as far as long term quality of life.  

There’s little risk if his seizures are under control. 

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4 minutes ago, corchjay said:

Sounds like a terrible decision if it’s used for medical purposes.

but for the kids sake why if you have epilepsy would you want to take extra blows to the head and cause more trauma.  It may be a blessing in disguise for him as far as long term quality of life.  

It’s also like the player himself said, playing football is a dream for him. Can’t fault a guy for wanting to fulfill his dreams

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4 minutes ago, AUDub said:

There’s little risk if his seizures are under control. 

I’m no Dr but you may not understand what it’s like to be a walk on.  There’s a reason why most only hang around a couple years..  you take a beating 

Edited by corchjay

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8 minutes ago, corchjay said:

I’m no Dr but you may not understand what it’s like to be a walk on.  There’s a reason why most only hang around a couple years..  you take a beating 

I played football at the high school level and do remember getting my a$$ kicked every day running scout team as a sophomore, so I have a decent idea of what it’s like.

If his seizures are under control, his risk approaches the baseline. It’s his dream. If he’s able, let him do it. Coddling him only emphasizes his disability.

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18 minutes ago, AUDub said:

I played football at the high school level and do remember getting my a$$ kicked every day running scout team as a sophomore, so I have a decent idea of what it’s like.

If his seizures are under control, his risk approaches the baseline. It’s his dream. If he’s able, let him do it. Coddling him only emphasizes his disability.

Amen brother 

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Trouble for the NCAA is that the oil makes it virtually impossible to pick up true cannabis in a drug screen. What is surprising to me is that so many of the drug screens are school-specific anyway.  As for the seizures, once under control he could play with precautions. (Just like the snow girl in softball.)

the oil either needs cleared for everybody--and then whoa watch out to see lots of players be prescribed the med to "cover" or player needs to find another way to control the seizure like traditional meds if possible until the rule is changed or marijuana is legalized in sports for recreational use, which also seems relatively reasonable. 

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20 minutes ago, AUDub said:

I played football at the high school level 

The juniors and seniors hitting you in HS will be a lot different than the juniors and seniors that will be hitting CJ. You also assumed by the time you were a junior or senior you were moved up the depth chart and some other lanky body will take your spot on the scout team. He will never see the field unless the rule changes and that can be a discouraging obstacle in itself. Not to mention he will be putting in ten times the prep for the game week. Corch is right regarding the rigors of scout team work and the waning enthusiasm in its continued participation. 

 

Shame on the NCAA. Hope the lawyers eventually bankrupt the organization.

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Just now, aujeff11 said:

The juniors and seniors hitting you in HS will be a lot different than the juniors and seniors that will be hitting CJ. You also assumed by the time you were a junior or senior you were moved up the depth chart and some other lanky body will take your spot on the scout team. He will never see the field unless the rule changes and that can be a discouraging obstacle in itself. Not to mention he will be putting in ten times the prep for the game week. Corch is right regarding the rigors of scout team work and the waning enthusiasm in its continued participation. 

 

Shame on the NCAA. Hope the lawyers eventually bankrupt the organization.

The point is that I know what it's like to get your ass beat in practice by guys far further along than you physically. I wasn’t addressing the duration. If he burns out, he burns out, but let him do it as long as he wants and his risk is in line with the general population.

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25 minutes ago, passthebiscuits said:

Trouble for the NCAA is that the oil makes it virtually impossible to pick up true cannabis in a drug screen. What is surprising to me is that so many of the drug screens are school-specific anyway.  As for the seizures, once under control he could play with precautions. (Just like the snow girl in softball.)

the oil either needs cleared for everybody--and then whoa watch out to see lots of players be prescribed the med to "cover" or player needs to find another way to control the seizure like traditional meds if possible until the rule is changed or marijuana is legalized in sports for recreational use, which also seems relatively reasonable. 

Yeah it's definitely not as easy as allowing him an exception to play. I don't know how difficult it would be to get a prescription to the oil. I'm guessing not very difficult, considering the broad range of ailments that it's used to treat. 

A real rock and a hard place.

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Just now, LakeBum said:

Is it the NCAA's position that cannabis is a performance-enhancing drug?

I'm pretty sure it's based solely on it's legality. Marijuana is still a schedule 1 drug under federal law.

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22 minutes ago, AUDub said:

The point is that I know what it's like to get your ass beat in practice by guys far further along than you physically. I wasn’t addressing the duration. If he burns out, he burns out, but let him do it as long as he wants and his risk is in line with the general population.

I doubt there will be much objection into him working on the scout team from our side

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14 minutes ago, Barnacle said:

A real rock and a hard place.

I’m guessing if the NCAA was willing to devote the resources, they could determine who needed the exceptions. Kinda like the way the hardship waivers were before the NCAA got lazy.

Edited by aujeff11

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14 minutes ago, aujeff11 said:

I doubt there will be much objection into him working on the scout team from our side

And it would gall me if that would be all he could aspire to. Adlai Trone was a few classes ahead of me at Hewitt-Trussville. Went from walk-on to starter during his time at Auburn. This kid’s chance at that is compromised by silly legalities. 

Edited by AUDub
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11 minutes ago, AUDub said:

And it would gall me if that would be all he could aspire to. Adlai Trone was a few classes ahead of me at Hewitt-Trussville. Went from walk-on to starter during his time at Auburn. This kid’s chance at that is compromised by silly legalities. 

We’ve certainly had our share of success stories when it comes to walk-ons with the latest being Hastings. I guess we will never know how it could’ve been. The good thing is his seizures are under control at his age now that he’s able to drive. 

Are there not legal forms of medication that are just as effective? 

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2 hours ago, bigbird said:

Maybe they can remarket it as deer antler spray and everything be okay...

Yes, I guess he’s not working and sweating out in the heat, then driving with a stolen weapon, with Cannabis in the vechicle, because that would be OK as well.

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It is indeed sad. Medical Marijuana will not make one high but only help those poor folks like this young man to lead a normal life.  Medical marijuana should be made legal in all states end of question.  States where it is legal have a lower incidence of opiate abuse than those where it is illegal.  I am not for recreational use of it whatsoever, but think once all states legalize medical marijuana, we will see folks getting the pain and other conditions relief they deserve without opiates.

Edited by doc4aday
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