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AURex

New NCAA rule regarding draft

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Among the many new rule changes announced by the NCAA coming out of the Rice Commission recommendations, college players who enter the NBA draft but are not drafted will be able to return to college basketball.

Although this works to the benefit of players, offering them a fall-back, it might also encourage a lot more kids to enter the draft who really shouldn't.

It's not reported yet whether rules related to hiring an agent are being changed along with this rule change.

https://apnews.com/tag/Collegebasketball

 

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20 minutes ago, AURex said:

It's not reported yet whether rules related to hiring an agent are being changed along with this rule change.

 

Yeah, this is false.

The NCAA adopted a sweeping series of policy and rules changes Wednesday that it hopes will clean up college basketball, which has been engulfed by an FBI investigation and other corruption over the last two years.

Among the significant changes that were adopted by the NCAA's Board of Governors and Division I Board of Directors are allowing elite high school basketball recruits and college players to be represented by agents who are certified by the NCAA; allowing eligible underclassmen to enter the NBA draft and return to school if undrafted; introducing more rigorous certification requirements for summer amateur basketball events; and imposing longer postseason bans, suspensions and increased recruiting restrictions for coaches who break the rules.

"These changes will promote integrity in the game, strengthen accountability and prioritize the interest of student-athletes over every other factor," NCAA president Mark Emmert said in a statement. "We remain committed to promoting fairness in college sports and creating an environment that will champion the success of student-athletes."

Among the most significant changes:

NBA draft: Since 2016, eligible underclassmen were able to enter the NBA draft, participate in the combine and then return to school as long as they withdrew from the draft no more than 10 days after the combine.

Pending anticipated approval from the NBA and NBA Players Association, the NCAA will now allow underclassmen to enter the draft, participate in the combine and then return to school if they go undrafted. The only requirements are that they request an evaluation from the NBA Undergraduate Advisory Council before deciding to enter the draft and then notify their school's athletics director of their intention to return by 5 p.m. on the Monday after the draft.

The players who return would be ineligible for the NBA draft until the end of the next college basketball season.

Enforcement: The NCAA is overhauling its process for investigating and adjudicating complex cases involving rules violations. Two independent groups will be appointed to oversee and resolve complex cases, which might involve academic misconduct, major penalties or adversarial behavior. Emmert said the enforcement rule changes will apply to all sports in Division I, and that the NCAA expected to have between three to five such cases every year, based on recent history. The new process will begin on Aug. 1, 2019.

School representatives, NCAA Division I Committee on Infractions members or NCAA enforcement staff can request that the independent groups review a complex case. An Infractions Referral Committee will then decide whether the request is granted.

The first independent group, called the Complex Case Unit, will include both external investigators with no school or conference affiliation and select NCAA enforcement staff. It will decide whether further investigation is needed.

A second group, called the Independent College Sports Adjudication Panel, which will be comprised of 15 people with backgrounds in law, higher education and sports and with no affiliations to NCAA schools or conferences, will review the findings of the first group, oversee the hearing and decide penalties, if applicable.

The NCAA said it is also holding school presidents and athletics staff more accountable for cooperating with investigators. They'll be contractually obligated to report violations in a timely manner and provide documentation and evidence when asked. The chair of the Division I Committee on Infractions or the Independent College Sports Adjudication Panel will have the power to impose immediate penalties when schools or individuals do not cooperate, including loss of revenue or postseason opportunities.

In another change that takes effect now, the people investigating NCAA cases will be allowed to accept information established by another administrative body, including a court of law, government agency, accrediting body or a commission authorized by a school. For example, the NCAA would be able to accept evidence and findings from the federal government's investigation into bribes and other corruption in college basketball and punish those found guilty of wrongdoing, without investigating the allegations on its own.

The NCAA said coaches and staff members who break its rules will face more severe penalties, including longer postseason bans (up to five years), longer head coach suspensions (beyond one season) and longer employment limitations (potentially lifetime show-cause orders). Those changes also take effect immediately.

Agents: Effective immediately, the NCAA will allow college players to be represented by NBA-certified agents (the agents must become NCAA-certified no later than Aug. 1, 2020) beginning after any season, as long as they request an evaluation from the NBA Undergraduate Advisory Committee. Agents will be permitted to pay for meals and transportation for players and their families during the agent selection process and for meetings with pro teams, if changes are made to agent acts and state laws.

If the NBA and NBA Players Association change their rules and make high school basketball players eligible for the draft at age 18, as expected, they'll be allowed to sign with an NCAA-certified agent starting July 1 before their senior year of high school, as long as they have been identified as an elite senior prospect by USA Basketball.

A USA Basketball official told ESPN that his group hadn't yet approved some of the changes announced by the NCAA on Wednesday. Several NBA officials have also told ESPN that they didn't think the league's age requirement would be lowered to 18 until 2021 at the earliest.

The agent agreements must be in writing and will be terminated when the student enrolls or returns to college.

Recruiting: Beginning later this month, basketball prospects will now be allowed to take as many as 15 official visits, compared to only five before. The prospects can begin making trips on Aug. 1 before their junior year of high school They'll be permitted to make five visits between Aug. 1 and the end of their junior year; five visits between the end of their junior year and Oct. 15 after high school graduation; and five more visits between Oct. 15 after high school graduation and the remainder of their college eligibility.

A student-athlete can visit a particular campus only once per year, and Division I schools will now be permitted to pay for 28 official visits over a rolling, two-year period (34 visits for service academies.) The previous totals were 24 official visits for Division I programs and 30 for service academies.

Academics: Starting in August 2019, Division I schools will now be required to pay for tuition, books and fees for scholarship basketball players who leave school and return within 10 years to the same school to earn their first degree. Only players who attended school for at least two years before leaving are eligible. The NCAA is establishing a fund for schools that are financially unable to pay for the players' education when they return.

Summer basketball: Beginning in January, Basketball-related events for high school students will be more scrutinized during certification to address concerns about corruption and third-party influence among high school players.

A new recruiting calendar in 2019 will allow college coaches to attend more high school-sponsored events, but will limit their access to events not sponsored by high schools. College coaches will be permitted to attend the National Basketball Players Association Top 100 Camp in mid-June, as well as two more events at the end of that month, if the National Federation of State High School Associations has approved them. Four-day recruiting periods were added to April, as well.

The new calendar also allows coaches to attend NCAA youth development camps in late July, which are a new collaboration between the NCAA, USA Basketball, the NBA and NBAPA. They can also still attend one weekend youth basketball event in early July; coaches could previous attend three weekends of youth basketball events in July.

http://www.espn.com/mens-college-basketball/story/_/id/24320401/ncaa-announces-new-college-basketball-policy-including-agents-players-longer-postseason-bans

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2 hours ago, aujeff11 said:

Football players be like: “what about us?”

Mostly it is about the NBA and what they allow....and don't allow...and the fact (as we have discussed) that if you aren't drafted in the first round by the NBA you are not likely to get very far.  

As for agents.....can't see any college player being allowed to hire an agent …..and then un-hire him if he does not get a "satisfactory" draft slot. JMO but that would be like letting a coyote baby sit one of your chickens for a few weeks and then expecting to get the chick back unharmed....or in the case of NBA agents, untainted. 

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15 minutes ago, augolf1716 said:

It will happen sooner then later imo

 Yep! In wrestling terms the NCAA just opened the Door for a no holds barred, 80 man  Battle  royal cage match.

Edited by ellitor
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7 hours ago, aujeff11 said:

Yeah, this is false.

Yeah, I said it's not reported YET at the time I posted. It was NOT false. The news report I posted was like an hour after the NCAA news was first released and it was from the authoritative source at the time. The article you posted was hours later. Don't be pissy.

 

 

Edited by AURex
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1 hour ago, AURex said:

 

The news reports from other outlets brought out the accurate information prior to your post. I linked Jeff Goodman’s tweet which covered the same rule changes on the Frankie Sullivan page before you even created this thread as a matter of fact. 

1 hour ago, AURex said:

Don't be pissy.

 

For saying “Yeah, that is false?”  lol. The horror...

Lastly, you didn’t post a “ news report.” You sent us to the AP college basketball homepage (lol) and all of the latest relevant reports discuss the changes regarding agents. So please show us which report you were talking about. Mmk?

Was this the news report that you intended to post? 

https://apnews.com/3f0dd60e277c4f2e9f199f630293aa54/NCAA-adopts-college-basketball-reforms-for-agents,-NBA-draft

“NCAA adopts college basketball reforms for agents, NBA draft”

 

 

Edited by aujeff11

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5 hours ago, aujeff11 said:

The news reports from other outlets brought out the accurate information prior to your post. I linked Jeff Goodman’s tweet which covered the same rule changes on the Frankie Sullivan page before you even created this thread as a matter of fact. 

For saying “Yeah, that is false?”  lol. The horror...

Lastly, you didn’t post a “ news report.” You sent us to the AP college basketball homepage (lol) and all of the latest relevant reports discuss the changes regarding agents. So please show us which report you were talking about. Mmk?

Was this the news report that you intended to post? 

https://apnews.com/3f0dd60e277c4f2e9f199f630293aa54/NCAA-adopts-college-basketball-reforms-for-agents,-NBA-draft

“NCAA adopts college basketball reforms for agents, NBA draft”

 

 

I suppose you didn't notice that news blurbs scroll at AP, but I should have hunted down a better source. Thank you for posting more complete report.

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OK....calm down guys.....what's done is done.....

So the question in my mind is.....what is gonna be the effect on young (not quite good enough for the NBA) players who get involved with what has clearly been a thoroughly  corrupt system?  .    JMO but leading lambs to the slaughter in the name of "looking after the kids"

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1 hour ago, DAG said:

Agreed, don't think there is any doubt whatsoever!

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I only read the first prt of article and stopped.  It is crap writing ... saying only 6 would have benefited?  There would be substantially more kids go through the draft - auburn would have had 2-3 go through the process most likely ... then not get drafted and return.

this may be simplistic view but the nba has no desire to help the NCAA.  Further, it seems AAU has generally been the corrupting concept for the NCAA issues ... shady people, apparel, money etc.

the NCAA can make whatever rules they want right?  Make participation in AAU ball ineligible for NCAA play.  Voila, you eliminate significant demons.  There will be other stuff to do but that seems like a fairly easy thing to do.

Simultaneously make the access between college coaches and high school basketball more palatable.  It isn’t perfect but the high school environment should be healthy than others.

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Agree Eagle.....

6 minutes ago, mustache eagle said:

Simultaneously make the access between college coaches and high school basketball more palatable.  It isn’t perfect but the high school environment should be healthy than others

JMO but the NCAA is making a reasonably honest effort to fight the corruption that permeates the sport of basketball...and most of the media people who cover sports seem entirely OK with the corruption.   So rather than blaming the crooks, they look for ways to blame the colleges or NCAA....talking about "kids not getting paid", etc.....and of course forgetting that in basketball, there are thousands playing the sport in college and maybe 20 or so who could be playing in the NBA if the NBA's rules were different.     Might as well blame banks and 7-11 stores for hold-ups because they have all that money that other people "need"    

And no one asking how much wining and dining the media people are doing courtesy of the apparel companies ….who seem to be the real winners in this corrupt system.. NCAA is basically a non--profit organization ….whereas you can bet that Nike, Adidas and the other major apparel companies aim much higher than that. 

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11 minutes ago, mustache eagle said:

I only read the first prt of article and stopped.  It is crap writing ... saying only 6 would have benefited?  There would be substantially more kids go through the draft - auburn would have had 2-3 go through the process most likely ... then not get drafted and return.

this may be simplistic view but the nba has no desire to help the NCAA.  Further, it seems AAU has generally been the corrupting concept for the NCAA issues ... shady people, apparel, money etc.

the NCAA can make whatever rules they want right?  Make participation in AAU ball ineligible for NCAA play.  Voila, you eliminate significant demons.  There will be other stuff to do but that seems like a fairly easy thing to do.

Simultaneously make the access between college coaches and high school basketball more palatable.  It isn’t perfect but the high school environment should be healthy than others.

You shoud have read a lot more. You have to actually get invited to the NBA combine and not get drafted to benefit from this.  Only 1 person from Auburn, Austin Wiley, got an NBA combine invite. Holy crap. You formulated an whole opinion and didn’t even read the whole piece.

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6 minutes ago, DAG said:

You shoud have read a lot more. You have to actually get invited to the NBA combine and not get drafted to benefit from this.  Only 1 person from Auburn, Austin Wiley, got an NBA combine invite. Holy crap. You formulated an whole opinion and didn’t even read the whole piece.

True but still, the NBA is the problem....not the NCAA.....which is trying to work on a policy that does not penalize the thousands of kids who have no chance at the NBA….and keep some control over players who have the potential to personally benefit outside of their scholarships.   Otherwise, you end up with two tiers of college athletes.. 

Those advocating that college basketball players be paid from NCAA revenue, are not really interesting in the 5000 or so who will never play a professional basketball game...it's all about the handful who will go professional somewhere.  

IF NBA changed it's policies to allow signing of kids right out of HS this "problem" would mostly go away. 

 

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18 minutes ago, AU64 said:

True but still, the NBA is the problem....not the NCAA.....which is trying to work on a policy that does not penalize the thousands of kids who have no chance at the NBA….and keep some control over players who have the potential to personally benefit outside of their scholarships.   Otherwise, you end up with two tiers of college athletes.. 

Those advocating that college basketball players be paid from NCAA revenue, are not really interesting in the 5000 or so who will never play a professional basketball game...it's all about the handful who will go professional somewhere.  

IF NBA changed it's policies to allow signing of kids right out of HS this "problem" would mostly go away. 

 

From all accounts the NBA was set to move forward with the one and done. I am not at home so I can’t link articles right now, but a quick google search will show this. However, Litigation and rule changes doesn’t happen over night when you have a collective bargain agreement in place. I think the earliest of change happening would’ve been 2020 last I read. But I recommend doing your own research. 

Secondly, The idea that this is the NBA fault is madness. One and done could be placed on the NBA due to the age limit requirement, but until the NCAA address the monopoly they are making off these athletes , they are always going to run into these problems. Getting rid of the age requirement will not change that other then there would be no true  incentive for the top, key word, top players to even think about college. Well, guess what? D1 coaches still got to produce . How do you think they are going to entice these TOP kids to go to their schools?

Edited by DAG
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And funny..dig more deeper into this. None of this stuff can even occur until after the NBA and NBPA meet about ending the one and done. Even more cloudy is the way they are going about allowing “elite” players to be able to get representation of an agent. Heck, they put the onus of representation of a high school recruit on the basis and determination of USA Basketball. What?’ Why? NCAA made this rule , they should be the one policing it...

Sorry I can’t really copy the link right now but this is from the sports illustrated article “NCAA announces undrafted players.”

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1 hour ago, DAG said:

 Heck, they put the onus of representation of a high school recruit on the basis and determination of USA Basketball. What?’ Why? NCAA made this rule , they should be the one policing it...

Can't see the NCAA getting into the business of predicting who might be NBA material.    Too many conflicts of interest involved in my view.    I guess USA basketball could be considered a neutral 3rd party.

Just me, but I don't trust the NBA at all.....they have the best end of the deal and can talk all day about making changes....and give excuses why they can't do it...and just continue the status quo.   Meanwhile, the NCAA schools continue to help weed out  the contenders from pretenders among HS basketball players.  

As with football, we can declare them 4* or 5* but until they are matched up against guys their own size and speed, we don't know very much.     Likely, under the current system,  college basketball and the NCAA have saved the NBA owners millions,  maybe hundreds of millions of dollars in bad contract decisions and bonus money,  by revealing which kids who while in HS, look like another Labron or Michael Jordan,  in fact will likely never play at the NBA level. 

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