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Tiger Refuge

Kitchen table project

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I’ve been threatening for a while to build a table(my first). So this weekend, I picked up some rough cut red oak lumber from a local sawmill. Six  2x8x10’ that were originally cut for trailer flooring. Been outdoor drying for over two years. Also picked up a 4x6x12’ cypress beam. All for $60. 

Just finished the first bit of work with the hand planer. Going to start fitting pieces together.

This stuff is fun.

 

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Sooooooo. Today, I stopped by a wood shop that I noticed a year or so ago. Dude is KILLING it. He has a ton of reclaimed lumber, plus slabs. Huge slabs. He does a bunch of live edge work. Absolutely freaking gorgeous. We visited about my table, and he confirmed something that’s been pecking at the inner recesses of my brain. My lumber is still green. Even after more than a year of air drying. So I need to account for “movement”. He gave me some ideas on my continuing project. I’m going back tomorrow to visit some more. He was super excited that I’m a forester and could help him identify some of the tree chunks that had been delivered to him. He also doesn’t have a great hook up for logs. So, looks like I may be able to help him out in that department.

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1 hour ago, Tiger Refuge said:

Sooooooo. Today, I stopped by a wood shop that I noticed a year or so ago. Dude is KILLING it. He has a ton of reclaimed lumber, plus slabs. Huge slabs. He does a bunch of live edge work. Absolutely freaking gorgeous. We visited about my table, and he confirmed something that’s been pecking at the inner recesses of my brain. My lumber is still green. Even after more than a year of air drying. So I need to account for “movement”. He gave me some ideas on my continuing project. I’m going back tomorrow to visit some more. He was super excited that I’m a forester and could help him identify some of the tree chunks that had been delivered to him. He also doesn’t have a great hook up for logs. So, looks like I may be able to help him out in that department.

Interesting......I started to send a link on grain and matching to avoid warp but figured you were familiar with the potential problems....there are differing ideas on necessity to reverse boards to minimize or avoid cupping as the wood continues to dry.

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On 2/27/2019 at 10:31 PM, AU64 said:

Interesting......I started to send a link on grain and matching to avoid warp but figured you were familiar with the potential problems....there are differing ideas on necessity to reverse boards to minimize or avoid cupping as the wood continues to dry.

I’m somewhat familiar with grain matching and some of the issues associated with it. The finer details of wood movement...yeah. Its gonna be a learning process for sure.

I picked up some 4.5-5’ heart pine beams from him yesterday. I had to force some money on him. They were trimmed pieces that he had stacked up on his yard. The tightness of the grain on them is amazing. Not something you see around the south any more.

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22 minutes ago, Tiger Refuge said:

I’m somewhat familiar with grain matching and some of the issues associated with it. The finer details of wood movement...yeah. Its gonna be a learning process for sure.

I picked up some 4.5-5’ heart pine beams from him yesterday. I had to force some money on him. They were trimmed pieces that he had stacked up on his yard. The tightness of the grain on them is amazing. Not something you see around the south any more.

I've fought the battle on my deck of "pressure treated, kiln dried lumber" that refused to stay straight...yella wood... .and of course it shrunk too over time so the "no gap" installation now has enough room to drop a peanut though the openings....which traps twigs and stuff.     Hard to beat lumber pieces that have been sitting inside a barn for ten years and forgotten. 

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1 hour ago, AU64 said:

I've fought the battle on my deck of "pressure treated, kiln dried lumber" that refused to stay straight...yella wood... .and of course it shrunk too over time so the "no gap" installation now has enough room to drop a peanut though the openings....which traps twigs and stuff.     Hard to beat lumber pieces that have been sitting inside a barn for ten years and forgotten. 

Man. Today’s lumber really pales in comparison to lumber from 20 years ago. A big part of it is the aggressive growth rates of the timber. Tree farming. I know I’m preaching to the choir.

Check these bad boys out. $20 for both pieces. Like I said, he wanted to just give them to me.

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Edited by Tiger Refuge
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2 hours ago, Tiger Refuge said:

Man. Today’s lumber really pales in comparison to lumber from 20 years ago. A big part of it is the aggressive growth rates of the timber. Tree farming. I know I’m preaching to the choir.

Check these bad boys out. $20 for both pieces. Like I said, he wanted to just give them to me.

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Those are the kind of pieces that will give your saw blade or planer a work out.   

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On ‎3‎/‎15‎/‎2019 at 12:04 PM, Tiger Refuge said:

A little clean up work.

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So..how old is that piece...tight grain...does the "count the rings" thing really work? 

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12 minutes ago, AU64 said:

So..how old is that piece...tight grain...does the "count the rings" thing really work? 

It does work. This one is tough to count, and there can be some “false rings”. This post is 7.5” square and I counted around 123 rings. I did get some back history on these beams. They are all longleaf pine that came from a tobacco drying shed at RJ Reynolds. The guy bought a truckload of them and had them shipped here. These pieces are the leftover cutoffs.

Longleaf is the slowest growing pine in the southeastern US. Now occupy about 5% of their historical range. We’re used as turpentine producers, then clearcut in the early 20th century. 

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Love using materials like this!!  These are the walnut slabs i'm using for my kitchen upper shelves and flip up bar.  I also cut the kitchen window ledge out of one of the slabs to replace the marble piece.

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That table looks great.  Did you refinish it or is it a new build??

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28 minutes ago, tgr4lfe said:

That table looks great.  Did you refinish it or is it a new build??

It’s a new build. And boy have a learned a few things. It’s 6/4 red oak top (basically trailer lumber) all air dried. The base is my favorite. Reclaimed piles from an RJ Reynolds warehouse in North Carolina. It is longleaf pine.

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22 hours ago, Tiger Refuge said:

It’s a new build. And boy have a learned a few things. It’s 6/4 red oak top (basically trailer lumber) all air dried. The base is my favorite. Reclaimed piles from an RJ Reynolds warehouse in North Carolina. It is longleaf pine.

Very cool.  Love reclaimed projects.  I'm using the old kitchen cabinets from my house as base units for my miter saw worktable.  I got a free "entertainment center" that is basically two cut down pallets with a 2x4 support structure and i'm going to make it into a large rolling workstation.  

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