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Social distancing arrests target people of color

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https://www.vox.com/identities/2020/5/8/21252091/social-distancing-arrests-target-people-of-color

 

 

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Since shelter-in-place orders were implemented throughout the US, there has been a growing number of videos showing police using excessive violence when arresting people of color for social distancing violations.

In San Diego, a black woman was arrested for walking her dog in Ocean Beach on May 1.Video of the arrest shows three officers repeatedly slamming the woman to the ground while putting her in handcuffs.

In Los Angeles, police donned riot gear, formed a skirmish line, and used their batons to disperse a large birthday party that had gathered in the city’s predominantly black Hyde Park neighborhood in late March, according to a video taken at the gathering.

Meanwhile, in New York City, several videos of excessively violent social distancing arrests of people of color have gone viral. This has come in sharp contrast with other viral videos and photos of police in white neighborhoods within the city calmly handing out masks to park-goers.

While racial breakdowns of many localities’ arrest records have not yet been made public, early data out of New York City shows that social distancing policing is falling heaviest on black people and other communities of color.

Arrest data released late Thursday by the Brooklyn District Attorney’s office showed that between March 17 and May 4, 40 people were arrested for violating the city’s social distancing order. Of those 40 arrests, 35 were black, four were Latinx, and one was white. More than a third of the arrests came in the borough’s predominantly black Brownsville neighborhood.

Brooklyn district attorney Eric Gonzalez told the New York Times that he’s reviewing the arrests to determine if charges are necessary. At this point in the pandemic, his office has declined to prosecute misdemeanor cases that do not involve public safety threats, including social distancing arrests.

“We cannot police our way out of this pandemic,” Gonzalez told the Times.

But Brooklyn’s numbers reflect a larger trend throughout the rest of the city. According to aCBS2 report, 120 people were arrested for violating the social distancing order between March 16 and May 5; almost 68 percent of those arrests were black and 24 percent were Latinx, while only 7 percent were white.

And yet Jennvine Wong, a staff attorney for the Cop Accountability Project at the Legal Aid Society, told Vox that the data may not be capturing the full picture of the NYPD’s actions — it could be a lot worse. “I’m not exactly sure how the NYPD is categorizing [social distancing arrests] and if they have one code that they’re categorizing it under or their methodology in doing so,” she said, referring to how people may be getting charged with something else. “It’s one of the reasons why we did ask and request from the NYPD some more details with respect to their enforcement guidelines, but we haven’t received that information as of yet.”

Wong compared the social distancing orders with stop and frisk, which effectively allowed police to stop anyone on the suspicion of a crime. “It’s hard to tell whether or not, for example, [with] a criminal possession of marijuana case, that person was approached because of social distancing or because there was some other reason for the approach that gave the officer some sort of reasonable suspicion to stop that person,” she said. “I think that is exactly where you see people drawing this reference to stop and frisk.”

New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio initially defended the NYPD’s social distancing arrest policy at a news conference Thursday. “What happened with stop and frisk was a systematic, oppressive, unconstitutional strategy that created a new problem much bigger than anything it purported to solve,” he said. “This is the farthest thing from that. This is addressing a pandemic. This is addressing the fact that lives are in danger all the time. By definition, our police department needs to be a part of that because safety is what they do.”

But after the Times reported the racial disparities in the arrest data, de Blasio changed his tune, promising on Twitter to “do better.”

The arrests of people of color for violating social distancing orders are painted in sharp relief against the backdrop of wide-scale — and heavily white — protests against those same orders across the country.

Armed white men have demonstrated and protested at numerous state Capitols and in big cities all over the US without drawing much of a reaction from local police at all. In Texas, a white woman who was jailed for opening her salon business in defiance of the state’s order became the cause du jour for conservative lawmakers in the state. She was released from Dallas county jail after a state Supreme Court ruling.

The racial disparity in policing wasn’t a surprise to Gloria J. Browne-Marshall, a professor of criminal justice at John Jay College in New York City. “Why is anyone surprised with this when we have police and other white people killing black and brown people with impunity?” asked Browne-Marshall.

Excessive policing of black and brown communities has been at the heart of American policymaking for 400 years, she told Vox. It’s not surprising that this has carried on into the coronavirus pandemic.

“This over-policing and over-criminalization of people of color, black and brown people, needs to actually be viewed from a different perspective,” Browne-Marshall said, explaining how these arrests cascade into larger issues for people of color. “Now you have people [who were arrested], if they did have a job, now they have more difficulties keeping that job. Which means there are more difficulties keeping their families together. And we’ll have another media article on the disproportionate number of housing issues when it comes to people of color.”

 

 

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This is my shocked face. 

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The solution here is simple. Stop arresting people for violating the social distancing suggestions. It's ridiculous.

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between people upset with a black pres and trumps "they are good people" this crap is getting worse and worse. if you read the story and it does not sicken you you might be a racist..................

yahoo.com
 

Yahoo

Blake Montgomery

Port City Daily

Port City Daily

A white sheriff’s deputy in North Carolina is facing criminal charges after allegedly leading an armed mob to the home of a black teenager and trying to force their way inside as part of a botched vigilante mission.

New Hanover & Pender County District Attorney Ben David on Friday announced the charges against Jordan Kita, a New Hanover Sheriff’s Office detention officer accused of wearing his uniform while leading the group of people—one of whom was allegedly packing an AR-15—to confront a high school student at his home. Kita has since been fired from the sheriff's office.

The teenager, Dameon Shepard, was playing video games late one evening when the group of men arrived at his door, demanding to know the whereabouts of a 15-year-old girl named Lekayda Kempisty who had been reported missing. Three in the group were said to be armed, carrying a shotgun, a semi-automatic rifle, and a handgun. Kita wore his New Hanover County Sheriff’s deputy uniform and gun, though he had not come to Shepard’s house on official business.

The group said they were going to enter the house and question him, the Port City Daily reports. But in addition to having no legal authority to question or detain Shepard, they also had the wrong guy.

The mob was in search of a man whose first name was Josiah. Josiah had reportedly previously lived in the neighborhood, but the only thing he apparently had in common with Shepard was being African-American in the predominantly white neighborhood. The armed group reportedly did not believe Shepard when he told them he wasn't who they were looking for.

“There’s one in a police uniform, and he speaks to me first,” Shepard told the Port City Daily. “He says, ‘We’re looking for a missing girl. We were given this address, we were given your name, and we were told that she’s here. So we’re going to enter,’” Shepard was quoted as saying.

He said he told the group they could not come inside and tried to shut the door, but Kita planted his foot so the door could not close. 

According to a letter from the Shepards’ attorney, James Lea, “Dameon became very frightened and hysterical, and kept repeating that his name was Dameon and that he attended Laney High School.”

Shepard’s mother, awoken by the confrontation, then came to the front door.

“The crowd was angry, and I still did not know what was going on,” Monica Shepard told the Port City Daily. “[Kita] kept saying, ‘I’m going to step inside, close the door, and talk to you,’ and I said, ‘No, you’re not.’”

She told the vigilantes that her son was not named Josiah. Kita is said to have insisted he be allowed inside, but the mob eventually left. The missing girl, who had run away from home, was located later that evening.

“The whole time, I was worried the worst would happen,” said Monica Shepard. “I’m still in shock. I don’t sleep well.” 

When Pender County sheriff’s deputies arrived later that night to investigate, they made no arrests and, according to Lea, took no names.

Monica Shepard said, “Coming to the door like that with a mob of people with guns, what do we expect? What were their intentions? What if he was the person they were looking for or what if I was not home? What would’ve happened? I don’t want to have that conversation. I don’t want him to be a statistic. It’s scary.”

Dameon and his mother Monica plan to file a civil lawsuit, according to their attorney. Lea called the sheriff’s department’s conduct an “outrageous and egregious violation.” 

“We obviously cannot have armed groups of citizens patrolling the streets of Pender County or New Hanover County terrorizing innocent families,” the lawyer wrote.

Kita has been fired from the New Hanover County Sheriff’s Office, and the office is conducting an internal affairs investigation, The News & Observer reports. He’s charged with breaking and entering, forcible trespassing, and failure to discharge duties. A second man, Austin Wood, is charged with “going armed to the terror of the public.”

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23 hours ago, aubiefifty said:

between people upset with a black pres

I was never upset with a black President. I was upset with a lousy President who happened to be black. Are you saying it's OK to be upset with a white President but if you don't like the things a black President does, that makes you a racist? That's silly.

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2 hours ago, Mikey said:

I was never upset with a black President. I was upset with a lousy President who happened to be black. Are you saying it's OK to be upset with a white President but if you don't like the things a black President does, that makes you a racist? That's silly.

i never mentioned you mikey. i doubt you are a racist at all but if you think obama did not face racism as well as his wife then there is no hope for you. people were hanging effigies of obama dangling from a tree and michelle was often compared to looking like a gorilla. this happened constantly for eight years. of course many switched from the n word to muslim. the man  went to his christian church regular and never cheated. his pastor told everyone he was saved but folks kept pushing the muslim thing. and many of you were mad because obama did the "apology" tour after we just completely destroyed iraq over lies. he was trying to help get us back in the good graces with the folks of the middle east to soften terrorism and maybe build a bridge where we could all get along better. the only thing that surprises me is obama is still alive. america does not do well with what they think of uppity blacks and it is happening right now........

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3 hours ago, aubiefifty said:

many of you were mad because obama did the "apology" tour

Yep. I was duped into voting for him the first time he ran. (he is a smooth talkin' snake oil salesman) I supported him until that tour apologizing for American exceptionalism. That's where he lost me. We are exceptional and I, for one, am proud of it.

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19 hours ago, Mikey said:

Yep. I was duped into voting for him the first time he ran. (he is a smooth talkin' snake oil salesman) I supported him until that tour apologizing for American exceptionalism. That's where he lost me. We are exceptional and I, for one, am proud of it.

What small-minded thinking. :no:

Yes we are "exceptional" (but probably in more ways than you are willing to admit.)

But we are are most certainly capable of committing "grave" wrongs.  Just like the the wrong that Reagan apologized for in 1988 regarding the internment of Japanese Americans. 

It's the POTUS's job to acknowledge such errors, that's what makes us exceptional:

 

“… We gather here today to right a grave wrong. More than 40 years ago, shortly after the bombing of Pearl Harbor, 120,000 persons of Japanese ancestry living in the United States were forcibly removed from their homes and placed in makeshift internment camps. This action was taken without trial, without jury. It was based solely on race, for these 120,000 were Americans of Japanese descent.

“… The legislation that I am about to sign provides for a restitution payment to each of the 60,000 surviving Japanese Americans of the 120,000 who were relocated or detained. Yet, no payment can make up for those lost years. So, what is most important in this bill has less to do with property than with honor. For here, we admit a wrong; here, we reaffirm our commitment as a nation to equal justice under the law.

https://www.pacificcitizen.org/recalling-president-ronald-reagans-remarks-on-signing-the-civil-liberties-act-of-1988/

 

Edited by homersapien
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22 hours ago, homersapien said:

But we are are most certainly capable of committing "grave" wrongs. 

Yes we are. The Japanese interment is a good example, and President Reagan was correct to apologize.  Obama went around apologizing for America being exceptional which is not at all similar to apologizing for some mistake. For eight years Obama did everything in his power to drag us down to their level but fortunately, he failed.

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52 minutes ago, Mikey said:

Yes we are. The Japanese interment is a good example, and President Reagan was correct to apologize.  Obama went around apologizing for America being exceptional which is not at all similar to apologizing for some mistake. For eight years Obama did everything in his power to drag us down to their level but fortunately, he failed.

:bs:

How about a quote of Obama "apologizing for America being exceptional".

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51 minutes ago, Mikey said:

Yes we are. The Japanese interment is a good example, and President Reagan was correct to apologize.  Obama went around apologizing for America being exceptional which is not at all similar to apologizing for some mistake. For eight years Obama did everything in his power to drag us down to their level but fortunately, he failed.

The difference for me is Reagan, as he should have, apologized to American citizens.  He did not apologize to foreign governments for America’s actions trying to save our country.  Obama’s attempt at kum ba ya with a globalization twist has turned out to be ill advised.  I’m glad Hillary didn’t have the opportunity to expand on this philosophy. 

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4 hours ago, I_M4_AU said:

The difference for me is Reagan, as he should have, apologized to American citizens.  He did not apologize to foreign governments for America’s actions trying to save our country.  Obama’s attempt at kum ba ya with a globalization twist has turned out to be ill advised.  I’m glad Hillary didn’t have the opportunity to expand on this philosophy. 

"Trying to save our country"?

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I can't speak to what is happening in NYC and if there's inequality in policing the matter it should be corrected.  But down here in Alabama, if there's a disparity its probably because black folks here that decide to disobey the orders on large gatherings have been doing so blatantly - with block parties in the streets.  And they post the gathering on social media.  You're begging the cops to come do something in that situation.  When I've heard about white folks doing it, it seems like it's at someone's house and more under the radar.  Not as large and obvious.  And I don't see posts about it online, I hear it from their neighbors.

 

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1 hour ago, homersapien said:

"Trying to save our country"?

You know, trips to the Middle East after conflicts (wars) there.  To Vietnam and Hiroshima after wars there.  The Middle East thing, I’m sure, didn’t embolden the radicals.

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13 hours ago, homersapien said:

:bs:

How about a quote of Obama "apologizing for America being exceptional".

Your memory cannot be that bad. The apology tour became infamous in short order and as an Obamanista you must remember it very well. Or are you so ashamed of him that you've blocked his actions from your memory?

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11 hours ago, Mikey said:

Your memory cannot be that bad. The apology tour became infamous in short order and as an Obamanista you must remember it very well. Or are you so ashamed of him that you've blocked his actions from your memory?

So if your memory is so much superior, please stop weaseling and quote the statement he made "apologizing for America being exceptional".

Obama was a good president.  I certainly was not and am not "ashamed" of him, which is a hell of a lot more I can say about the current president - or you for than matter. 

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20 hours ago, I_M4_AU said:

You know, trips to the Middle East after conflicts (wars) there.  To Vietnam and Hiroshima after wars there.  The Middle East thing, I’m sure, didn’t embolden the radicals.

What did he say about Iraq, Vietnam and Hiroshima?

Surely you must remember since it made such an impression on you.

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21 minutes ago, homersapien said:

What did he say about Iraq, Vietnam and Hiroshima?

Surely you must remember since it made such an impression on you.

 

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12 hours ago, homersapien said:

So if your memory is so much superior, please stop weaseling and quote the statement he made "apologizing for America being exceptional".

You don't deserve this, because you know good and well he went on apology tours. But, I've got a little time so here are just two of countless articles on the subject of Obama kow-towing to the hash-hish smokers and woman abusers of the Middle East.

https://www.heritage.org/europe/report/barack-obamas-top-10-apologies-how-the-president-has-humiliated-superpower

https://www.wsj.com/articles/SB124044156269345357

Edited by Mikey
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On 5/11/2020 at 7:34 AM, Mikey said:

I was never upset with a black President. I was upset with a lousy President who happened to be black. Are you saying it's OK to be upset with a white President but if you don't like the things a black President does, that makes you a racist? That's silly.

Same s*** will happen to every President regardless of race/gender. People over the last 20 years have gotten bolder with it, and modern communications allows more to see the actions. It also allows for mass spreading of the actions. During the last 20 years people of all genders/races have shown disdain for a President through simulated violence and attacks on personal characteristics be they trait or physical. Then of course if your white, you are gonna be compared to Hitler/Nazi now.

 

bushnoose1.jpg

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trumphung1.jpg

trumphung2.jpeg

trumphung4.png

palinhung.jpg

hillaryhung.jpg

hillarynazi.jpg

trumphung5.jpg

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6 hours ago, Texan4Auburn said:

Same s*** will happen to every President regardless of race/gender. People over the last 20 years have gotten bolder with it, and modern communications allows more to see the actions. It also allows for mass spreading of the actions. During the last 20 years people of all genders/races have shown disdain for a President through simulated violence and attacks on personal characteristics be they trait or physical. Then of course if your white, you are gonna be compared to Hitler/Nazi now.

 

bushnoose1.jpg

bushnoose2.jpg

trumphung1.jpg

trumphung2.jpeg

trumphung4.png

palinhung.jpg

hillaryhung.jpg

hillarynazi.jpg

trumphung5.jpg

You're not entirely off base, but white people hanging other white people in effigy is much, much different than white people doing the same with black people. And then something different again when, as one photo above explicitly states, a black person does it with a white person.

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46 minutes ago, McLoofus said:

You're not entirely off base, but white people hanging other white people in effigy is much, much different than white people doing the same with black people. And then something different again when, as one photo above explicitly states, a black person does it with a white person.

If you want equality though then color/gender/religion shouldn't matter, just that this form of protest is an act of Freedom of Speech.

Just how I view things. Like if they want Confederate Statues torn down I'm good with that, just make sure you pull all the statues associated with the Indian Wars also. So Sherman, Grant, Custer, the Buffalo Soldiers... those are all associated Native American Homicide. The have to come down also.

N word (along other slurs for all groups). Nobody should use it or any form of it period. Sorry how I was raised by parents that supported civil rights in the 50's/60's in Alabama.

A woman shouldn't be considered a bitch for doing things a man is celebrated for, but if she does things a man is called a dick for then don't complain when called a bitch.

I guess the issue some have with me is that, no pun intended,  I'm very black and white on several things. When you talk equality for people I don't like putting alot of grey in there, cause then it really isn't equality.

And yes, there will all be prejudice a**holes. It will never go away, get less maybe, but never will be gone. Always be people that just gotta be that guy.

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15 minutes ago, Texan4Auburn said:

If you want equality though then color/gender/religion shouldn't matter, just that this form of protest is an act of Freedom of Speech.

Just how I view things. Like if they want Confederate Statues torn down I'm good with that, just make sure you pull all the statues associated with the Indian Wars also. So Sherman, Grant, Custer, the Buffalo Soldiers... those are all associated Native American Homicide. The have to come down also.

N word (along other slurs for all groups). Nobody should use it or any form of it period. Sorry how I was raised by parents that supported civil rights in the 50's/60's in Alabama.

A woman shouldn't be considered a bitch for doing things a man is celebrated for, but if she does things a man is called a dick for then don't complain when called a bitch.

I guess the issue some have with me is that, no pun intended,  I'm very black and white on several things. When you talk equality for people I don't like putting alot of grey in there, cause then it really isn't equality.

And yes, there will all be prejudice a**holes. It will never go away, get less maybe, but never will be gone. Always be people that just gotta be that guy.

Definitely falls under 1A no matter who's doing the "hanging" and who's getting "hanged", but "legal" or "illegal" only occasionally line up with "right" or "wrong" IMO.

I respect and appreciate your perspective. Even a hard if/then statement allows for an if. That alone makes you more open-minded than many. 

Edited by McLoofus
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