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NCAA COVID-19 guidelines include masks on sidelines


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NCAA COVID-19 guidelines include masks on sidelines

By Creg Stephenson | cstephenson@al.com

Resocialization of Collegiate Sport

The graphic released by the NCAA shows the difference between COVID-19 projections and reality. (NCAA.com)

The NCAA on Thursday released a comprehensive new set of “return to play” guidelines, as the COVID-19 pandemic rages on with football season fast approaching.

In a memo entitled “Resocialization of Collegiate Sport: Developing Standards for Practice and Competition,” the NCAA’s Sport Science Institute outlined several guidelines for the safe return to competition. Those guidelines include:

• COVID-19 testing and results to be completed within 72 hours of competition in “high risk contact sports” such as football • Daily self-checks for athletes and staff • Masks to be worn on the sideline by all players, coaches and staff, including players who move from the playing field to the sideline to confer with coaches

• Outdoor training when possible, with indoor training only permissible with “good ventilation”

• Individuals with “high risk exposure” must be quarantined for 14 days The NCAA is using the Centers for Disease Control definition of “high risk exposure,” which is as follows: “any situation in which there has been greater than 15 minutes of close contact, defined as being less than six feet apart, with an infectious individual,” regardless if that individual is “symptomatic, pre-symptomatic or asymptomatic.”

“Any recommendation on a pathway toward a safe return to sport will depend on the national trajectory of COVID-19 spread,” said Brian Hainline, NCAA chief medical officer. “The idea of sport resocialization is predicated on a scenario of reduced or flattened infection rates.”

The NCAA also released a graphic showing “where we are” and “where we thought we’d be” in relation to new confirmed cases of COVID-19. As one might expect, the difference is significant.

Mandatory workouts have been allowed since July 13, with a transition to “countable athletic related activities” — such as walkthroughs using a football — set to begin July 24. Under current guidelines, regular full-squad practices can begin Aug. 7.

Most 2020 college football season-openers are set for the weekend of Sept. 5. The schedule remains in flux, however, as a number of conferences — including the Big Ten and Pac-12 — have ruled out playing non-conference games this fall.

The NCAA memo does not address fan attendance or guidelines. However, on Thursday, the University of Illinois announced that it was limiting attendance at Memorial Stadium to 20 percent of its 60,670-seat capacity this season. In addition, face coverings must be worn by fans and tailgating is not allowed.

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Just now, passthebiscuits said:

...and here we go...

How does a player have a mask when they go from the field to the sideline to confer with coaches? 
 

just one of many questions left unanswered.

 

I can only see this progressing to a delay and finally a cancellation of the season.

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17 minutes ago, passthebiscuits said:

...and here we go...

How does a player have a mask when they go from the field to the sideline to confer with coaches? 
 

just one of many questions left unanswered.

 

easy ! It won’t go answered . It’s conflicting , compromising decisions based on money. It’s laughable. Kind of like the NFL allowing full on tackle football , but then saying you cannot engage within six feet after the game and definitely not jersey swapping 

Edited by DAG
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39 minutes ago, jared52 said:

I can only see this progressing to a delay and finally a cancellation of the season.

I don’t see a cancellation at this point. It’s definitely a last resort but I think they’ll play in the spring at worst.

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Masks on the sidelines? What a joke. Like this is going to keep people safe when we have 22 out there piling up every play without a mask and a couple hundred crammed in close proximity on the sideline? Lol....

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23 minutes ago, fredst said:

Masks on the sidelines? What a joke. Like this is going to keep people safe when we have 22 out there piling up every play without a mask and a couple hundred crammed in close proximity on the sideline? Lol....

And on the field is where most of the heavy breathing and spitting and what not happens.

I'm still curious why there's not more talk of plexiglass(-like) dividers being used where people are meant to congregate. 

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1 hour ago, McLoofus said:

I'm still curious why there's not more talk of plexiglass(-like) dividers being used where people are meant to congregate. 

Are they going to allow them to use the see through plastic shields we used to see on the facemask? Seems like a built in PPE?

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4 minutes ago, oracle79 said:

Are they going to allow them to use the see through plastic shields we used to see on the facemask? Seems like a built in PPE?

My head started drifting there, too. Maybe extend it down further? Could pose a breathing problem. But I will spitball just about any safety measure that might give us sports back. 

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1 hour ago, McLoofus said:

I'm still curious why there's not more talk of plexiglass(-like) dividers being used where people are meant to congregate. 

I saw an article where Oakley has made one and the NFL is considering implementing them. JJ Watt said he would be against playing if he had to wear one his helmet. 

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13 minutes ago, aubearcat said:

Seems like a great idea, especially if the majority of players have no problem with it.

As for JJ Watt, he averages 65 plays a game at 4 seconds each (in games he actually plays in and finishes healthy). That's 4 1/2 freaking minutes of game play for the entire game. Also, Houston's defense averaged 6 1/2 plays given up per drive. That's a lot of breaks. JJ Watt stands to make $15.5 million in 2020. I really hope that JJ Watt can dig down deep and find a way to participate. 

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3 hours ago, Win4AU said:

At least the coaches won’t have to cover their mouths to keep from getting the plays stolen

I would bet that a lot will still hold the clip board up over their mouth.  Double protection, yeah that’s the ticket.

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6 hours ago, passthebiscuits said:

How does a player have a mask when they go from the field to the sideline to confer with coaches? 

You know how HCs have a "get back, coach" guy attached to their belt? Well, we'll now have a "here's your mask" guy attached to the "get back, coach" guy's belt as well as a "get your mask on" guy stalking the rest of the sidelines.

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6 hours ago, passthebiscuits said:

...and here we go...

How does a player have a mask when they go from the field to the sideline to confer with coaches? 
 

just one of many questions left unanswered.

 

It would seem that a measure to maintain a 6’ distance would suffice in this case. I mean, 6 feet should be close enough to confer with a coach. Short of some sort of covering that would be quickly placed over the helmet, I think just staying 6’ away would do. 

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2 minutes ago, bigbird said:

You know how HCs have a "get back, coach" guy attached to their belt? Well, we'll now have a "here's your mask" guy attached to the "get back, coach" guy's belt as well as a "get your mask on" guy stalking the rest of the sidelines.

I was thinking the exact same thing.

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That whole thing is just so goofy. Required on the sideline but not while you are playing...actual physical contact. Not tailgating and fans required to wear masks. It’s just so laughable and pathetic really. 

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10 minutes ago, Viper said:

Everyone that was seated wasn’t wearing a mask, including the couple that were literally two feet behind me. Yet standing in line six feet behind the next person, I had to. Makes perfect sense. 

Point is...there were no do’s and don’ts posted. It was just figure it out for yourself. 95% of the customers weren’t wearing masks because they were seated. Because we noticed that, we didn’t wear our’s when we entered. 

That's why the CDC says you are at the highest risk of exposure in places of that regardless of enclosure or outside patio

https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/community/organizations/business-employers/bars-restaurants.html

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8 hours ago, McLoofus said:

And on the field is where most of the heavy breathing and spitting and what not happens.

I'm still curious why there's not more talk of plexiglass(-like) dividers being used where people are meant to congregate. 

Disagree strongly with this. Depending on the amount of bourbon in play I spit voluminously even at home by myself during a game. It usually involves swearing at high decibel levels

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52 minutes ago, fredst said:

Disagree strongly with this. Depending on the amount of bourbon in play I spit voluminously even at home by myself during a game. It usually involves swearing at high decibel levels

Boy, do I know the perfect college football team for you...

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Yea, if players running off the field require a mask to be on the sideline......cancel the season. It’s not sensible to play it. I think you can avoid it by testing everyone a day or two before every game . If everyone on both sides is negative there’s no need for masks. Fans can and shhold  probably wear masks. At this point fans are probably not a concern. But you cannot take a player running off huffing and puffing ( who sometimes needs oxygen) and further limit his oxygen levels with a mask. 

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3 minutes ago, alexava said:

Yea, if players running off the field require a mask to be on the sideline......cancel the season. It’s not sensible to play it. I think you can avoid it by testing everyone a day or two before every game . If everyone on both sides is negative there’s no need for masks. Fans can and shhold  probably wear masks. At this point fans are probably not a concern. But you cannot take a player running off huffing and puffing ( who sometimes needs oxygen) and further limit his oxygen levels with a mask. 

Well, according to CNN, the cost of a test is between $20 and $750. So let’s go with say $200. If you test everyone on the sidelines (150 people let’s say), that’s $30K per round. With the loss in revenue the season is already up against, another $300-500k is going to be hard to come by for a lot of schools. 

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2 minutes ago, jared52 said:

Well, according to CNN, the cost of a test is between $20 and $750. So let’s go with say $200. If you test everyone on the sidelines (150 people let’s say), that’s $30K per round. With the loss in revenue the season is already up against, another $300-500k is going to be hard to come by for a lot of schools. 

Just take that out of every head coach salary. It’s a drop in the bucket. 

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