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Simple and Perfect BGE Holiday Turkey


SaltyTiger
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Doing for years with great results

> Thaw turkey and pat dry with paper towel ( Prefer a turkey in 14 or 15 pound range)

> Coat turkey with olive oil or butter ( prefer olive oil here)

> Season with salt/pepper or other preferred seasoning

> Heat Egg to approx 300 degrees and add hickory or pecan wood chunks

> Place Turkey breast up on V rack in drip pan

> Using digital thermometer cook to 165 degrees ( 12 to 14 min/pound )

> Rest one hour before carving

IMG_0060 (1).jpg

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I've had good results with similar steps. The only difference is I'll soak it in a brining solution for 12-15 hrs after fully thawed.  Then rinse and pat dry and leave in fridge for a few hours.  Take out and inject breasts and thighs with some sort of flavored liquid. (I like the Tony Chacheres Cajun Butter. It also comes with a syringe) Then do the olive oil and spice rubs. 

I have a vertical smoker, so the next time I might hang it instead. 

I also have tried the Spatchcock method on chicken with good results. You cut out the backbone and basically flatten it out. It cooks faster. May try it with turkey sometime. 

 

BTW, your turkey looks delicious.

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On 12/29/2020 at 11:00 AM, johnnyAU said:

I've had good results with similar steps. The only difference is I'll soak it in a brining solution for 12-15 hrs after fully thawed.  Then rinse and pat dry and leave in fridge for a few hours.  Take out and inject breasts and thighs with some sort of flavored liquid. (I like the Tony Chacheres Cajun Butter. It also comes with a syringe) Then do the olive oil and spice rubs. 

I have a vertical smoker, so the next time I might hang it instead. 

I also have tried the Spatchcock method on chicken with good results. You cut out the backbone and basically flatten it out. It cooks faster. May try it with turkey sometime. 

 

BTW, your turkey looks delicious.

Have a 15# turkey for Thanksgiving and my son suggested injecting and or brine. Hesitant because of the success in the past plus brining another step. I always buy Butterball and never a problem with it being moist. Experiences and suggestions please.

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I have not tried smoking a turkey without both brining and injecting, although I recently heard of a guy trying it both ways and said there wasn't a noticeable difference between the two as far as juiciness and taste.  

I don't think you'll go wrong either way. It'll be delicious.

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On 11/22/2021 at 6:07 PM, SaltyTiger said:

Have a 15# turkey for Thanksgiving and my son suggested injecting and or brine. Hesitant because of the success in the past plus brining another step. I always buy Butterball and never a problem with it being moist. Experiences and suggestions please.

I always brine turkey to cook on the BGE. At least in my hands it makes a big difference in keeping the bird more moist on the ceramic ( do not brine the oven cooked bird). It’s an extra step but very easy

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8 hours ago, fredst said:

I always brine turkey to cook on the BGE. At least in my hands it makes a big difference in keeping the bird more moist on the ceramic ( do not brine the oven cooked bird). It’s an extra step but very easy

Ended up smoking one yesterday morning, not brined. Cooked another late yesterday for sons in-laws, brined. Both great but have to give brined the edge.

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15 minutes ago, Barnacle said:

Brine mine every time. I always buy birds which haven’t been pre-brined, which Butterball turkeys are, IIRC.

Good point. Turkey I did not brine was a Butterball. The latter was not a Butterball. Hardest thing to me about fooling with Turkey is making sure it is thawed properly and carving it. Have the carving down but on holidays it is difficult to find enough space on the counters to work. Carving a turkey systematically and properly is an art like filleting a fish.

To be honest not a huge turkey fan. After having once or twice I’m done with it for a quite a while. I do love the soup my wive makes with what I don’t carve off the carcass.

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