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Potential OCs for 2022?


AUDevil
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27 minutes ago, AEAugirl said:

Lebby is an OU alum.  That was a no brainer.  

Brian Kelly is not an LSU alumni 

Jimbo Fisher not a TXam alumni

i get what you are saying, but AU has zero back bone to go hire the big name at any position. 

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41 minutes ago, JDUBB4AU said:

Lebby to OU. I wish AU had the nuts to go hire a big time OC. The whole AU dynamic has to change . Quit making excuses. Damn 

Coach Venables is a defensive mind and will need an OC that is capable of handling the offense.  We have a offensive coach that is trying to find an OC that will compliment his style.  There will not be a splash hire that can do that, IMHO.

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11 minutes ago, JDUBB4AU said:

Brian Kelly is not an LSU alumni 

Jimbo Fisher not a TXam alumni

i get what you are saying, but AU has zero back bone to go hire the big name at any position. 

Who cares about backbone. I want good coaches. They don't have to be 'king' of everything. 99% of all teams don't get these guys either.

 

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Hiring a coach with some pedigree is something we all want. Look at UAT. They are a coaching mill that churns out coaches and doesn't miss a beat. It's part of the "system". We are at a disadvantage, mainly, because AU doesn't recruit itself and doesn't have an established pipeline to the NFL. Building that type of success, from where we are now, takes time. CBH has a vision and hiring a quality recruiter and solid OC with a head on his shoulders is paramount to his ability to remain employed. That said, what candidate checks most, if not all, the boxes? We have a short list of guys who check one or the other. I'm not overly impressed with this list. I'm hoping he hits a homerun. I like some of the things I've seen from CBH.  

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1 hour ago, JDUBB4AU said:

Brian Kelly is not an LSU alumni 

Jimbo Fisher not a TXam alumni

i get what you are saying, but AU has zero back bone to go hire the big name at any position. 

AND, It’s not really for a lack of money. It seems to be a lack of direction.

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2 minutes ago, metafour said:

That's insane - even if he was hired, he would be running some VARIATION of Harsin's offense.

This. This is what drove me insane. He wouldn't be coming here to run the air raid. It would be to add more sophisticated passing concepts. I would've liked to have him here, but TT would be a much better fit. 

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3 minutes ago, metafour said:

Here is the reality that some of you need to realize:

In today's coaching realm, "big time" OC's want to work for DEFENSIVE MINDED head coaches so that they have full autonomy over the offense. This is why Jeff Grimes went to work for Kalani Sitake at BYU, and then Dave Aranda at Baylor (and why it doesn't make much sense for him to come here). This is also the big driving force behind Jeff Lebby leaving Kiffin to go work for Venables at Oklahoma. It's why it doesn't make any sense for Joe Brady to come here when he can easily find a job where the offense is all his.

When the HC is a defensive minded coach, there is never any confusion as to who deserves the credit for any offensive success. Furthermore, there is less likelihood of meddling from the HC (like what happened during Malzahn's entire tenure here).

With Bryan Harsin as the HC here, the offensive will forever and always be HIS offense. He's not going to allow anyone to come in here any just do whatever they want offensively. At most, there is going to be an understanding that the OC can make additions or "morph" the pre-existing offense, but that's it. When Kittley's name popped up, I saw people talking as if he'd bring the Air Raid here. That's insane - even if he was hired, he would be running some VARIATION of Harsin's offense.

Most "big time" OC's want to progress their career and become HC's themselves. It's easier to sell yourself and your ability if there is no question as to who deserves the credit for offensive success. This is why when you look at coaching staffs around the country, the teams that have offensive minded HC's more often than not have young or "underling" OC's. You might see a few retreads like Mike Bobo where we got him by paying him a lot of money and allowing him to get the hell away from South Carolina, but how many cases can you find where you have a "big name OC" butting heads and sharing the spotlight with an offensive mined HC?

It's why suggestions like Dan Mullen were always stupid. Why would Dan Mullen want to come here and have Bryan Harsin dictating what he can or can't do? When he could theoretically find a job where the HC is a defensive guy, and will let him control the offense entirely?

By the way, the opposite of what I wrote above is also true. Look at who the DC's are for Bama under Saban, and UGA under Smart:

Pete Golding - hired away from UTSA (where he was the DC for two seasons) to become "Co-DC" and ILB coach at Bama. Promoted to DC after just one season.

Dan Lanning - hired away from Memphis to be the OLB coach at Georgia, he had never been a DC anywhere. After one season he was promoted to DC - again, the first time he's ever been a DC.

Why didn't Saban and Smart hire "big time" DC's? Seems odd that they'd need to reach for inexperienced small-school guys. Or do you think this is the byproduct of the HC in both cases being a hands-on former DC themselves? In which case the defense is actually their defense? In which case it wouldn't make any sense for an already established "big time DC" to coach under them?

Everyone wants to bring up how Saban can go and hire Kiffin, Sarkisian, Bill O'Brien, etc. to be his OC....but seem invisible to the fact that on defense, he is NOT able to pull those types of names. It's not just Pete Golding; go look at Kirby Smart's resume before he became the DC at Bama - he had only been a DC for one season prior, and it was at VALDOSTA STATE. This shouldn't surprise anyone; why would an established and "big name" DC want to play second-fiddle under Saban when they can explore opportunities where they have more freedom?

Now go look at Josh Heupel at Tennessee. His OC is Alex Golesh who was his "Co-OC" at UCF for just one season the year prior. Before that, Golesh had only ever been a position coach - he had no other play-calling experience whatsoever (and when he was Co-OC at UCF, it was still Heupel calling plays). Golesh is basically just an OC in name only; and whatever plays he's calling, are basically just whatever Heupel wants him to call.

 

I appreciate your perspective here. Makes sense & makes me feel a bit better about the OC search & the seeming likelihood of something less than a "splash" hire.

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27 minutes ago, metafour said:

Here is the reality that some of you need to realize:

In today's coaching realm, "big time" OC's want to work for DEFENSIVE MINDED head coaches so that they have full autonomy over the offense. This is why Jeff Grimes went to work for Kalani Sitake at BYU, and then Dave Aranda at Baylor (and why it doesn't make much sense for him to come here). This is also the big driving force behind Jeff Lebby leaving Kiffin to go work for Venables at Oklahoma. It's why it doesn't make any sense for Joe Brady to come here when he can easily find a job where the offense is all his.

When the HC is a defensive minded coach, there is never any confusion as to who deserves the credit for any offensive success. Furthermore, there is less likelihood of meddling from the HC (like what happened during Malzahn's entire tenure here).

With Bryan Harsin as the HC here, the offense will forever and always be HIS offense. He's not going to allow anyone to come in here any just do whatever they want offensively. At most, there is going to be an understanding that the OC can make additions or "morph" the pre-existing offense, but that's it. When Kittley's name popped up, I saw people talking as if he'd bring the Air Raid here. That's insane - even if he was hired, he would be running some VARIATION of Harsin's offense.

Most "big time" OC's want to progress their career and become HC's themselves. It's easier to sell yourself and your ability if there is no question as to who deserves the credit for offensive success. This is why when you look at coaching staffs around the country, the teams that have offensive minded HC's more often than not have young or "underling" OC's. You might see a few retreads like Mike Bobo where we got him by paying him a lot of money and allowing him to get the hell away from South Carolina, but how many cases can you find where you have a "big name OC" butting heads and sharing the spotlight with an offensive mined HC?

It's why suggestions like Dan Mullen were always stupid. Why would Dan Mullen want to come here and have Bryan Harsin dictating what he can or can't do? When he could theoretically find a job where the HC is a defensive guy, and will let him control the offense entirely?

By the way, the opposite of what I wrote above is also true. Look at who the DC's are for Bama under Saban, and UGA under Smart:

Pete Golding - hired away from UTSA (where he was the DC for two seasons) to become "Co-DC" and ILB coach at Bama. Promoted to DC after just one season.

Dan Lanning - hired away from Memphis to be the OLB coach at Georgia, he had never been a DC anywhere. After one season he was promoted to DC - again, the first time he's ever been a DC.

Why didn't Saban and Smart hire "big time" DC's? Seems odd that they'd need to reach for inexperienced small-school guys. Or do you think this is the byproduct of the HC in both cases being a hands-on former DC themselves? In which case the defense is actually their defense? In which case it wouldn't make any sense for an already established "big time DC" to coach under them?

Everyone wants to bring up how Saban can go and hire Kiffin, Sarkisian, Bill O'Brien, etc. to be his OC....but seem invisible to the fact that on defense, he is NOT able to pull those types of names. It's not just Pete Golding; go look at Kirby Smart's resume before he became the DC at Bama - he had only been a DC for one season prior, and it was at VALDOSTA STATE. This shouldn't surprise anyone; why would an established and "big name" DC want to play second-fiddle under Saban when they can explore opportunities where they have more freedom?

Now go look at Josh Heupel at Tennessee. His OC is Alex Golesh who was his "Co-OC" at UCF for just one season the year prior. Before that, Golesh had only ever been a position coach - he had no other play-calling experience whatsoever (and when he was Co-OC at UCF, it was still Heupel calling plays). Golesh is basically just an OC in name only; and whatever plays he's calling, are basically just whatever Heupel wants him to call.

 

But it doesn't fit the chicken little narrative!

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27 minutes ago, metafour said:

Here is the reality that some of you need to realize:

In today's coaching realm, "big time" OC's want to work for DEFENSIVE MINDED head coaches so that they have full autonomy over the offense. This is why Jeff Grimes went to work for Kalani Sitake at BYU, and then Dave Aranda at Baylor (and why it doesn't make much sense for him to come here). This is also the big driving force behind Jeff Lebby leaving Kiffin to go work for Venables at Oklahoma. It's why it doesn't make any sense for Joe Brady to come here when he can easily find a job where the offense is all his.

When the HC is a defensive minded coach, there is never any confusion as to who deserves the credit for any offensive success. Furthermore, there is less likelihood of meddling from the HC (like what happened during Malzahn's entire tenure here).

With Bryan Harsin as the HC here, the offense will forever and always be HIS offense. He's not going to allow anyone to come in here any just do whatever they want offensively. At most, there is going to be an understanding that the OC can make additions or "morph" the pre-existing offense, but that's it. When Kittley's name popped up, I saw people talking as if he'd bring the Air Raid here. That's insane - even if he was hired, he would be running some VARIATION of Harsin's offense.

Most "big time" OC's want to progress their career and become HC's themselves. It's easier to sell yourself and your ability if there is no question as to who deserves the credit for offensive success. This is why when you look at coaching staffs around the country, the teams that have offensive minded HC's more often than not have young or "underling" OC's. You might see a few retreads like Mike Bobo where we got him by paying him a lot of money and allowing him to get the hell away from South Carolina, but how many cases can you find where you have a "big name OC" butting heads and sharing the spotlight with an offensive mined HC?

It's why suggestions like Dan Mullen were always stupid. Why would Dan Mullen want to come here and have Bryan Harsin dictating what he can or can't do? When he could theoretically find a job where the HC is a defensive guy, and will let him control the offense entirely?

By the way, the opposite of what I wrote above is also true. Look at who the DC's are for Bama under Saban, and UGA under Smart:

Pete Golding - hired away from UTSA (where he was the DC for two seasons) to become "Co-DC" and ILB coach at Bama. Promoted to DC after just one season.

Dan Lanning - hired away from Memphis to be the OLB coach at Georgia, he had never been a DC anywhere. After one season he was promoted to DC - again, the first time he's ever been a DC.

Why didn't Saban and Smart hire "big time" DC's? Seems odd that they'd need to reach for inexperienced small-school guys. Or do you think this is the byproduct of the HC in both cases being a hands-on former DC themselves? In which case the defense is actually their defense? In which case it wouldn't make any sense for an already established "big time DC" to coach under them?

Everyone wants to bring up how Saban can go and hire Kiffin, Sarkisian, Bill O'Brien, etc. to be his OC....but seem invisible to the fact that on defense, he is NOT able to pull those types of names. It's not just Pete Golding; go look at Kirby Smart's resume before he became the DC at Bama - he had only been a DC for one season prior, and it was at VALDOSTA STATE. This shouldn't surprise anyone; why would an established and "big name" DC want to play second-fiddle under Saban when they can explore opportunities where they have more freedom?

Now go look at Josh Heupel at Tennessee. His OC is Alex Golesh who was his "Co-OC" at UCF for just one season the year prior. Before that, Golesh had only ever been a position coach - he had no other play-calling experience whatsoever (and when he was Co-OC at UCF, it was still Heupel calling plays). Golesh is basically just an OC in name only; and whatever plays he's calling, are basically just whatever Heupel wants him to call.

 

This is really good stuff, right here.  Most sense made in this thread to date...

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36 minutes ago, metafour said:

Here is the reality that some of you need to realize:

In today's coaching realm, "big time" OC's want to work for DEFENSIVE MINDED head coaches so that they have full autonomy over the offense. This is why Jeff Grimes went to work for Kalani Sitake at BYU, and then Dave Aranda at Baylor (and why it doesn't make much sense for him to come here). This is also the big driving force behind Jeff Lebby leaving Kiffin to go work for Venables at Oklahoma. It's why it doesn't make any sense for Joe Brady to come here when he can easily find a job where the offense is all his.

When the HC is a defensive minded coach, there is never any confusion as to who deserves the credit for any offensive success. Furthermore, there is less likelihood of meddling from the HC (like what happened during Malzahn's entire tenure here).

With Bryan Harsin as the HC here, the offense will forever and always be HIS offense. He's not going to allow anyone to come in here any just do whatever they want offensively. At most, there is going to be an understanding that the OC can make additions or "morph" the pre-existing offense, but that's it. When Kittley's name popped up, I saw people talking as if he'd bring the Air Raid here. That's insane - even if he was hired, he would be running some VARIATION of Harsin's offense.

Most "big time" OC's want to progress their career and become HC's themselves. It's easier to sell yourself and your ability if there is no question as to who deserves the credit for offensive success. This is why when you look at coaching staffs around the country, the teams that have offensive minded HC's more often than not have young or "underling" OC's. You might see a few retreads like Mike Bobo where we got him by paying him a lot of money and allowing him to get the hell away from South Carolina, but how many cases can you find where you have a "big name OC" butting heads and sharing the spotlight with an offensive mined HC?

It's why suggestions like Dan Mullen were always stupid. Why would Dan Mullen want to come here and have Bryan Harsin dictating what he can or can't do? When he could theoretically find a job where the HC is a defensive guy, and will let him control the offense entirely?

By the way, the opposite of what I wrote above is also true. Look at who the DC's are for Bama under Saban, and UGA under Smart:

Pete Golding - hired away from UTSA (where he was the DC for two seasons) to become "Co-DC" and ILB coach at Bama. Promoted to DC after just one season.

Dan Lanning - hired away from Memphis to be the OLB coach at Georgia, he had never been a DC anywhere. After one season he was promoted to DC - again, the first time he's ever been a DC.

Why didn't Saban and Smart hire "big time" DC's? Seems odd that they'd need to reach for inexperienced small-school guys. Or do you think this is the byproduct of the HC in both cases being a hands-on former DC themselves? In which case the defense is actually their defense? In which case it wouldn't make any sense for an already established "big time DC" to coach under them?

Everyone wants to bring up how Saban can go and hire Kiffin, Sarkisian, Bill O'Brien, etc. to be his OC....but seem invisible to the fact that on defense, he is NOT able to pull those types of names. It's not just Pete Golding; go look at Kirby Smart's resume before he became the DC at Bama - he had only been a DC for one season prior, and it was at VALDOSTA STATE. This shouldn't surprise anyone; why would an established and "big name" DC want to play second-fiddle under Saban when they can explore opportunities where they have more freedom?

Now go look at Josh Heupel at Tennessee. His OC is Alex Golesh who was his "Co-OC" at UCF for just one season the year prior. Before that, Golesh had only ever been a position coach - he had no other play-calling experience whatsoever (and when he was Co-OC at UCF, it was still Heupel calling plays). Golesh is basically just an OC in name only; and whatever plays he's calling, are basically just whatever Heupel wants him to call.

 

What you just posted is priceless. Absolutely totally correct, factual, and stated by someone that obviously knows a bit about football. I wish I had done it. That being said, you and whoever agrees with you will be considered idiots by half the board.

I hoist a beer in your honor! 

 

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5 minutes ago, JuscAUse! said:

What you just posted is priceless. Absolutely totally correct, factual, and stated by someone that obviously knows a bit about football. I wish I had done it. That being said, you and whoever agrees with you will be considered idiots by half the board.

I hoist a beer in your honor! 

 

I see your beer and I hoist an unbridled dilly in his direction! 

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1 hour ago, Weagle1787 said:

"The unbridled Dilly" sounds like some sort of naughty bedroom antics.

Glad I was through with my drink when I read this. 

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I'm dilly dallying up a nice bowl after one of the weirdest yet easiest law school finals I have taken in my 3 years and I come on here to check the scoops that may have come up while I was taking the exam.  Low and behold I find you buffoons going on for pages about this guy's dilly, how does one correctly perform a dilly, cracking cold dilly, and apparently TigerChris has a new move to try with his ole lady in the fartsack he named the Dilly.  Y'all just up in here getting dilly aren't yall?

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6 minutes ago, Didba said:

I'm dilly dallying up a nice bowl after one of the weirdest yet easiest law school finals I have taken in my 3 years and I come on here to check the scoops that may have come up while I was taking the exam.  Low and behold I find you buffoons going on for pages about this guy's dilly, how does one correctly perform a dilly, cracking cold dilly, and apparently TigerChris has a new move to try with his ole lady in the fartsack he named the Dilly.  Y'all just up in here getting dilly aren't yall?

The bean kicked in, huh?

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