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NIL Coming Under Scrutiny


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NCAA issues updated guidance on NIL collectives, boosters

Nick Schultzabout 2 hours
NCAA (Michael Allio/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images)

It’s official. The NCAA is cracking down on its NIL rules and recruiting.

The NCAA Board of Directors sent out new guidance Monday to its Division I membership clarifying the current rules and prohibiting boosters from recruiting. It’s effective immediately, and comes amid multiple calls for changes across the board.

“Today, the Division I Board of Directors took a significant first step to address some of the challenges and improper behaviors that exist in the name, image and likeness environment that may violate our long-established recruiting rules,” Georgia president Jere Morehead, the board chair, said in a statement. “While the NCAA may pursue the most outrageous violations that were clearly contrary to the interim policy adopted last summer, our focus is on the future. 

“The new guidance establishes a common set of expectations for the Division I institutions moving forward, and the board expects all Division I institutions to follow our recruiting rules and operate within these reasonable expectations.”

The new guidance also addressed prior violations after college leaders proposed retroactive punishments “or else” last week.

“For violations that occurred prior to May 9, 2022, the board directed the enforcement staff to review the facts of individual cases but to pursue only those actions that clearly are contrary to the published interim policy, including the most severe violations of recruiting rules or payment for athletics performance,” the guidance read. “Schools are reminded of their obligation to report any potential violations through the traditional self-reporting process.”

How talks of change impacted new NIL guidance

Change to NIL guidance seemed inevitable. In fact, Pac-12 commissioner George Kliavkoff and SEC commissioner Greg Sankey met with Congressional leaders in Washington, D.C. about potential national NIL legislation. One of the Senators the two met with, Marsha Blackburn (R-Tenn.), took a shot at outgoing NCAA president Mark Emmert in a statement after meeting with the commissioners.

Boosters aren’t allowed to be involved in recruiting under current rules, but an accusation of tampering came up earlier this offseason. Pittsburgh wide receiver Jordan Addison opted to enter the transfer portal just ahead of the May 1 deadline, but before he did, reports surfaced about a potential NIL deal if he decided to head to USC to play for Lincoln Riley. That came out before Addison officially entered the portal, which is why Pitt coach Pat Narduzzi called Riley regarding the situation.

That’s not the only time it’s come up, though. Earlier in the offseason, The Athletic reported an unnamed five-star recruit had an $8 million NIL deal waiting for them once they committed.

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What a joke. The NCAA sat on their hands on this,  the players sued them on the NIL and the USSC ruled in favor of the players. It's like the NCAA doesn't understand they lost the case. Yet now they think they can pass some rules and try to interfere in the legal NIL market place won by the players in court. There is something seriously wrong with these people. 

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I think the only way to truly get back to the era of scholar-athlete is to jack up the SAT/ACT and GPA requirements across the NCAA.

I don't know if that completely levels the talent pool but if money is going to be the determining factor of where a recruit goes then there needs to be a space where that is all that matters like an NFL "G-League" or USFL/XFL spring league.

Now that won't stop Bammers from continuing their player-buying ways but recruits would have to decide whether to take money as a professional or make more money in college but have to maintain a rigorous schedule.

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3 hours ago, JBiGGiE said:

I think the only way to truly get back to the era of scholar-athlete is to jack up the SAT/ACT and GPA requirements across the NCAA.

I don't know if that completely levels the talent pool but if money is going to be the determining factor of where a recruit goes then there needs to be a space where that is all that matters like an NFL "G-League" or USFL/XFL spring league.

Now that won't stop Bammers from continuing their player-buying ways but recruits would have to decide whether to take money as a professional or make more money in college but have to maintain a rigorous schedule.

This will never happen.  Hell, it's post-covid and some colleges don't even require an ACT/SAT score for admissions. 

And in our current situation, we sure don't need to place academic obstacles in the way of our Auburn NIL's efforts to retain talent on our rosters. 

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16 hours ago, IronMan70 said:

What a joke. The NCAA sat on their hands on this,  the players sued them on the NIL and the USSC ruled in favor of the players. It's like the NCAA doesn't understand they lost the case. Yet now they think they can pass some rules and try to interfere in the legal NIL market place won by the players in court. There is something seriously wrong with these people. 

The NCAA sat around and watched States pass NIL laws for years and Emmert chose to do nothing.  Then they had to fight the courts to the end and lost and all of the sudden Emmert is pushed out the door and others (Greg Sankey + Pac12 Commish) have met with Legislators in DC to beg for help.  

Many member institutions want regulation (I'd imagine Auburn does as well) and they've decided to completely overhaul the NCAA rule book.  The SCOTUS opened Pandora's box and now they're trying to reign it back in.  :dead:

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They remove all NIL restrictions then act surprised when it becomes a free for all....say it isn't so. That toothpaste is out of the tube I'm afraid.

It's going to take a lot of coordinated effort to repack some of this and I'm not sure that they'll find enough people who feel it's in their financial best interest to do it.

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On 5/4/2022 at 12:33 AM, IronMan70 said:

The NCAA can make all the rules they want but the USSC already ruled against them. They don't have a chance.  

Well this post didn't age well.....

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5 minutes ago, AUGnome said:

Well this post didn't age well.....

Why not? Unless congress changes the laws, the NCAA is powerless to dictate what a college athlete can or cannot do with regard to NIL. That's why Sanky & Co. went to Washington, DC., to try to get congress to get involved.

The NCAA hasn't come up with anything that would even stand up to the threat of a lawsuit, let alone an actual suit.

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11 minutes ago, Williamrussell said:

I believe that against NIL long time is necessary to apply a sanction. It's very strange how they do so much but have no regulation.

but I don't know much about rugby, but I read a post not long ago in the custom research paper column where they talked about the benefits of rugby. You can find it here https://edubirdie.com/custom-research-paper about how playing at the college level significantly affects college and its popularity, so I think the sport should be supported and maintained at the college level. I believe, in general, sports around students should be welcomed.

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