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i have no idea who this is or if they are legit. if they are not let ma know and i will not post these anymore.

 

rdtd1qrbbo691.webp

Edited by aubiefifty
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The Top 50 Atmospheres in #CollegeBasketball

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2023 NCAA Tournament Bracketology

By Joe Lunardi Updated: 6/14/2022 at 07:00 a.m. ET

Will the Kansas Jayhawks become the first repeat champion in men's college basketball since Florida in 2006-07? That's among the questions to consider in the offseason prelude to the 2022-23 season, a period that accounts for a frenzy of transfer movement and the usual spate of NBA draft decisions. When the dust settles, Division I's 350+ teams will begin considering the march to the 2023 NCAA tournament, a journey that will end at Houston's NRG Stadium for the Final Four on April 1 and 3. ESPN will be there every step of the way with its 2023 bracket projections, evaluating the current state of the bubble and identifying the top seeds for the game's showcase event.

 

Bracket Watch

Top Overall Seed

r1024830_864x1296_2-3.jpg&w=464&h=696&cquality=80
 

Gonzaga

First Team Out

r1024834_864x1296_2-3.jpg&w=464&h=696&cquality=80
 

Providence

Last Team In

r1024836_864x1296_2-3.jpg&w=464&h=696&cquality=80
 

Saint Mary's

We should have known Gonzaga would one day reclaim its seemingly permanent status as the No. 1 overall seed. The Bulldogs, led by All-American forward Drew Timme, reloaded quickly from their Sweet 16 loss to Arkansas and are once again poised to enter a season as the nation's top-ranked team. Eventually, the Zags will need to turn those rankings into a national title or risk a change in reputation from "overachiever" to "underachiever." In the meantime, I would be comfortable with any of three teams -- Kentucky and North Carolina being the others -- at the top of our offseason bracket. This time it's Gonzaga's turn.

On the Bubble

Last Four Byes

Last Four In

First Four Out

Next Four Out

68-Team Bracket

Moved Up

Moved Down

New Team to Bracket

Automatic Qualifier

WEST (LAS VEGAS)

Denver
  1. 9up.svg USC
Orlando
Des Moines
Sacramento
  1. 10down.svg Iowa
 

MIDWEST (KANSAS CITY)

Birmingham
Sacramento
  1. 4 TCU
Orlando
Birmingham
 

SOUTH (LOUISVILLE)

Columbus
Albany
Greensboro
Des Moines
 

EAST (NEW YORK)

Greensboro
Albany
Columbus
Denver
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Conference Breakdown

Conference
Team
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r/CollegeBasketball - Top defenders

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Panel approves awarding a technical foul for flopping in men’s basketball

Officials will no longer give a warning to players who fake being fouled

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The NCAA Playing Rules Oversight Panel approved allowing men's basketball officials to assess Class B technical fouls to players who fake being fouled, beginning in the 2022-23 season. 

If a player is called for flopping, the opposing team would shoot one free throw. Previously, officials would issue a warning before assessing a technical foul in subsequent incidents judged to be flopping.

The proposal came from the NCAA Men's Basketball Rules Committee.

Committee members defined flopping as an unsporting act that occurs when a player attempts to influence an official's judgment by creating an appearance that a foul has been committed when there has been incidental or no contact.

When evaluating potential flopping situations, officials will be asked to judge whether the player's physical reaction to the contact with another player is consistent with what would have been expected, given the force of the contact. When the reaction is not consistent, the player is most likely exaggerating the nature of the contact in an attempt to gain an advantage, and flopping has occurred.

A similar proposal was made in 2021, but there were concerns in the men's basketball community that removing a warning before awarding a technical foul would not have the desired effect. 

The Division I Men's Basketball Oversight Committee and the Division I Men's Basketball Competition Committee supported the concept of allowing officials to call technical fouls without warning when they determine a player has faked being fouled.

Technology rules

The panel also approved continuing experimental technology rules for conferences to allow teams to view live video and preloaded video on their bench for the upcoming season if the conference submits a waiver request.

Conferences that choose to use this experimental rule must decide what technology can be used within its parameters.

The experimental rule will also be allowed in multiple-team events and the 2023 National Invitation Tournament. 

NCAA women's basketball teams can also experiment with this technology rule during conference games for the upcoming season if the conference submits a waiver request.

Media timeouts

Conferences as well as the National Invitation Tournament can experiment using five media timeouts on the first dead-ball situations under the 17-minute, 14-minute, 11-minute, 8-minute and 4-minute marks of the second half.

The rationale is to help the flow of the game so commercial breaks will not be taken when teams use their allotted timeouts.

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  • aubiefifty changed the title to Top basketball courts per CBK Seversl articles

Best NBA player of all time for each current SEC school

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Alabama: Robert Horry
Arkansas: Sidney Moncrief
Auburn: Charles Barkley
Florida: Al Horford
Georgia: Dominique Wilkins
Kentucky: Anthony Davis
LSU: Shaquille O'Neal
Mississippi State: Bailey Howell
Missouri: Jordan Clarkson
Ole Miss: Johnny Neumann Elston Turner
South Carolina: Alex English
Tennessee: Bernard King
Texas A&M: Khris Middleton
Vanderbilt: Darius Garland

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sportscasting.com
 

College Basketball Players Can't Wear Nos. 6-9 and It's a Problem

 
4-5 minutes

In high school and NCAA basketball, players cannot use the numbers 6, 7, 8, or 9 in either the ones or tens place on their jerseys. This seems like a weird rule for college basketball players to have to follow.

But, according to Rule 1, Section 22, Article 7, Clause b. 2 of the NCAA Men’s Basketball 2018–2019 Rules, “The following numbers are legal: 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 00, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 50, 51, 52, 53, 54, and 55. Team rosters can include 0 or 00, but not both.”

This eliminates 6 through 9, 16 through 19, 26 through 29, 36 through 39, 46 through 49, and everything over 55. That’s 35% of the numbers between 00 and 55. Confused yet? So are we, let’s take a closer look at why college basketball players have to follow this strict guideline.

 

How are jersey numbers used in basketball?

 

 

College basketball players’ numbers are kept in writing by the scorer, but they’re also indicated on the hands by the officials when there is a foul. The rules say officials should “Signal the official timer to stop the game clock when a foul occurs, designate the offender to the official scorer and indicate with finger(s) the number of free throws.” 

The National Federation of State High School Associations (NFHS) is even more specific in its rules. They specify that “The Official shall report fouls to the scorer by using two hands to display the jersey number of the person who committed the foul. The official’s right hand will indicate the first digit of the number or the tens and the left hand will indicate the second digit of the number or the ones…. The digits of the number should be displayed at the same time.”

 

Why does the rule exist for college basketball players?

 

Since officials are supposed to communicate the jersey number of a player who committed a foul using two hands to indicate the entire number, there are numbers like six that would cause confusion. Depending on which fingers were used, the scorer might think the official meant 15 or 51 rather than six.

Having the rule creates a nice, simple system that minimizes confusion for the scorer. According to the New York Times, the NCAA has followed the numbering rule likely since the early 1960s. However, they don’t have a record of why the rule was officially introduced. Keeping this rule is likely also tradition since it’s been around for so many decades.

 

When does this rule cause problems?

 

This rule becomes a problem for schools that have retired a lot of jersey numbers. It doesn’t leave many number choices for new college basketball players. For example, Michigan State currently has nine retired numbers out of the 37 options while Duke has 13.

 

Could the rule be changed?

 

Critics of this policy point out that scorers should be able to figure out the difference between six and 15 and 51. Instant replays also could make the fingers less crucial. Replay equipment is now required at NCAA games.

There have been rule changes regarding NCAA college basketball jersey numbers in the past. Numbers one and two used to be on the “not allowed” list too. The reasoning was, they could be confused with the signal for the number of free throws. They are both permitted today.

 

 

What do other leagues do?

 

Other basketball leagues don’t seem to have this number problem. The NBA does indicate the numbers of players who foul using fingers, but they don’t have the same restrictions on jersey numbers. In the NBA, any number can be used from 0 and 00 to 99.

The Los Angeles Times does point out that, even in the NBA, numbers six through nine are less common. This makes sense since players want to keep their college numbers.

Players on international FIBA teams can also use numbers 0, 00, and one through 99. Officials use two hands to show numbers, and they display the tens place first with the back of the hand(s) facing forward before displaying the ones place with the palm of the hand(s) facing forward. Before 2014, with the introduction of video replay for scorers, FIBA players used only numbers four through 15.

Hopefully one day college basketball players will have the freedom to pick the jersey numbers they want. It really is a small thing to ask for in the grand scheme of it all.

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2 hours ago, aubiefifty said:

The Top 50 Atmospheres in #CollegeBasketball

FVfmUPXUEAMix_T.jpg

This one I could buy.

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2 hours ago, aubiefifty said:

r/CollegeBasketball - Top defenders

I think Allen Flanigan is going to play his way back on this list by the end of next season.

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I wonder where Kessler was on the list last year at this time???

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That first list is god awful

 

edit: that says backcourts...lmao. That's a big difference, I shoulda caught that 

Edited by Dual-Threat Rigby
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I think Creighton beats Kansas if they had Kalkbrenner. I watched a game of his at some point last season and dude was kinda nice. Their defensive schemes vs Kansas was also really yucky with not having him, it was clear he was their anchor 

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Okay, this whole thing is HokeyTown.

Top 50 Atmospheres -- whatever that means -- Texas Tech #2, Iowa State #4 ?????

Okay, I have lived in SEC territory, Big Ten territory, Pac12 territory, and Big East territory. If you are looking at very top tier teams against each other, it will be a madhouse anywhere you go. Duke vs UNC, Ohio State vs Michigan State, UK vs Kansas, etc.

For everynight crazyness, ha!, Duke, UNC and Kansas are hard to beat.

That said, in the SEC, Auburn has become (in the latest Pearl years) a venue nobody wants to visit, because .... OMG! ....... it's h3ll for visiting teams! Awesome fun!

The AU crowd is crazoid fun! Pearl definitely pulls in the crowds and I LOVE IT!

Edited by AURex
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13 hours ago, AURex said:

Okay, this whole thing is HokeyTown.

Top 50 Atmospheres -- whatever that means -- Texas Tech #2, Iowa State #4 ?????

Okay, I have lived in SEC territory, Big Ten territory, Pac12 territory, and Big East territory. If you are looking at very top tier teams against each other, it will be a madhouse anywhere you go. Duke vs UNC, Ohio State vs Michigan State, UK vs Kansas, etc.

For everynight crazyness, ha!, Duke, UNC and Kansas are hard to beat.

That said, in the SEC, Auburn has become (in the latest Pearl years) a venue nobody wants to visit, because .... OMG! ....... it's h3ll for visiting teams! Awesome fun!

The AU crowd is crazoid fun! Pearl definitely pulls in the crowds and I LOVE IT!

May be recency bias. The Tech crowd when Beard came into town is probably the livest atmosphere in CBB I can think of from last season. And the Auburn @ Arky, Auburn before Kentucky, Duke vs UNC the last time…those were nuts 

 

last season was just a great year overall for crowds though 

Edited by Dual-Threat Rigby
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20 hours ago, tigerman1186 said:

I wonder where Kessler was on the list last year at this time???

Seriously? Kessler was coming off a freshman season in which he averaged less than 10 minutes a game. He wasn't on any lists of this sort.

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