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Left now spinning "Oceans emit CO2 theory."


DKW 86

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In my simple mind and faded memory from physics classes, the oceans absorb CO2 from the atmosphere and the cooler temps allow it to hold more of the gas. When the oceans warm it releases co2 just as a soda releases more co2 when it is warmed. Boyles Law if I recall correctly. Therefore increased co2 levels is a result global warming and not a cause of global warming. Man contributes less than 1% of co2 to the atmosphere.

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... increased co2 levels is a result global warming and not a cause of global warming.

See, you are just a stupid repug, neo-con that is a tool of the energy industry. If you had paid any attention to Al Gore in his "documentary" you would know that "the debate on global warming is over." And there is no disagreement among scientists about whether this problem is real or not. Furthermore, if you would not be so closed minded and think outside your conservative little box, you would know that "When there is more carbon dioxide, the temperature gets warmer."

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(P1V1)nRT2=(P2V2)nRT1

Strictly speaking, the Ideal Gas Law (this) only applies to gases, not to concentrations of gas dissolved in liquid (e.g., ocean water). It is true, however, that increases in the ocean's temperature will effect its capacity as a CO2 buffer or sink.

There is no doubt that CO2 is a greenhouse gas that raises the average temperature of the Earth (Venus being a good example of the CO2 greenhouse effect gone wild). Even before humans, the CO2 in the atmosphere helped Earth maintain surface temperatures above what they would be if we had no atmospheric CO2. The only real debate is by how much, and how much human activities in the fossil fuel age have contributed to the issue.

And while increased CO2 produces an increase in the planet's overall average temperature, that does not necessarily mean a temperature increase at all points locally. As contrary to reason as it may seem, for example, more than likely a meltdown of the Greenland ice sheet would result in cooler temperatures in Europe and the North Atlantic (even possibly an ice age there) due to the influx of fresh water producing in a decrease or shut down of the Gulf Stream, Europe's "heater".

Another factor regarding CO2 in the ocean is its effect on the ocean's pH. Scientists have noted a rise in the general acidity of the ocean in recent decades along with the increases in dissolved CO2 (dissolved CO2 produces carbolic acid). What danger this decrease in pH* may pose to phyto-plankton and other marine species is also a point of debate. Marine organisms in turn are a significant part of the CO2 cycle of the planet: green algae breaking down CO2 through photosynthesis and shellfish trapping carbon in the calcium carbonate of their shells.

(*Lower pH = more acidic, for those with no chemistry background)

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