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This article is about a group of high school students who apparently failed their graduation exam protesting over not being allowed to walk.

Read the sign. :no:

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If you didn't care enough about your education to learn what it takes to pass a test..a test that a 7th grader should be able to get through...you don't deserve to walk across any stage.

I'm sick of the sense of entitlement in this country.

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I agree, very sad and irrational...

...unless, did the board change the policy/rules after these kids took the test? I don't think policy should have ever let them walk. But if the policy had been that they walk and was changed just days before graduation, I can see how they might feel cheated. The policy should be and should always have been "no pass (Exit Exam or classes), no walk"--but if not that way before, it should be changed to that prior to when they took the Exam or should grandfather in those hit by the change after they took their exam.

Sad thing abou the sign: If the parent doesn't know any better, she probably doesn't know what her child has missed nor how it can affect her child's future.

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Scattershooting here...some of this is informational, some of this is my opinion.

* The sign = supreme irony.

* I can't speak for FWISD, but in our district, students who did not pass the TAKS are not allowed to participate in graduation ceremonies. It has been this way for a couple of years, I think.

* The math section of the test is not something your garden variety 7th grader could pass...the test has gotten more rigorous each year. It's much more than just assessing basic arithmetic skills.

* The students who did not get to walk because of failing the TAKS had at least 4 opportunities to re-take the sections they did not pass. The exit level tests (English, Math, Science, Social Studies) are administered during their junior year...if a section/sections are failed, students can begin retaking those sections starting in the summer between their junior and senior year. Retesting is done in October, February and April as well.

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The new TIME magazine's cover story is on the "No Child Left Behind" program. (I know, for some of you TIME is far too liberal to even consider :poke: ). It's a long story that I haven't completely digested yet, but I was particularly taken by a discussion of state exams vs. national standardized tests:

http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/...1625192,00.html

CAN WE TRUST THE STATES TO SET STANDARDS?

But moving the goalposts may be inevitable. Decreeing that all kids (except 1% with serious disabilities and an additional 2% with other issues) must be proficient by 2014 is a little like declaring that all the children are above average in the mythical town of Lake Wobegon. California has some of the toughest K-12 curriculum standards in the nation, and O'Connell despairs of hitting the 2014 goal. "Today we don't have any of our schools with 100% student proficiency, and I will predict that we won't by 2014," he says. "Right now about one-quarter of our kids have to be proficient [to make AYP], but soon it's going to be increased 12% a year until 2014. You have to question the accountability system when 100% of your schools are going to be failing, by definition."

There are, however, two surefire ways to hit the 2014 target. One is for schools to cheat on the tests--a frighteningly commonplace solution, according to David Berliner, a respected education scholar at Arizona State University and a co-author of a new book, Collateral Damage, that documents the cheating trend. The other solution is to make the state tests easier, a phenomenon known among educators as "the race to the bottom." Philadelphia's Vallas likes to joke that there are two paths to success for his city's schools: improve instruction for students "or give them the Illinois tests."

Or better yet, Mississippi's. In 2005, 89% of fourth-graders in Mississippi were rated proficient in reading--the highest percentage in the nation. But when Mississippi youngsters sat for the rigorous NAEP--the closest thing to a national gold standard--they landed at the bottom: just 18% of fourth-graders made the grade in reading. States that have a tough curriculum and correspondingly tough exams--such as California and Massachusetts--are delivering a more rigorous education, but they're setting themselves up to fail in NCLB's terms.

No wonder so many states have watered down their expectations. An analysis by researchers at the Thomas B. Fordham Foundation, a Washington-based nonprofit, found that the quality of educational standards--which are detailed, grade-by-grade, subject-by-subject learning goals--declined in 30 states from 2000 to 2006. That includes the four states--Delaware, Kansas, North Carolina and Oklahoma--said to be on track for 2014. Overall, only three states earned an A from Fordham on curriculum standards--which are also the basis for state tests; 37 rated C-- or below.

In case you're interested: A table in the mag for all states shows that in Alabama, a little over 80% of the 4th graders passed the state reading exam that year, but only a bit over 20% passed the national test. The average gap, nationally, is 40 percentage points and Missouri has the lowest gap (and presumably then the most accurate state exam) with only a 2 point difference.

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If you didn't care enough about your education to learn what it takes to pass a test..a test that a 7th grader should be able to get through...you don't deserve to walk across any stage.

I'm sick of the sense of entitlement in this country.

Exactly. I always thought the state exams or even the ACT wasn't too difficult for any person with an average education. It's easy to do homework and obtain a high gpa with some schools.. it's another thing to test what you can actually do on your own using your own brain.

I do believe they are entitled to walk just upon the fact that they really did complete everything that highschool had to offer... you only get to walk with your fellow classmates once. On the other hand, they shouldn't receive a diploma at all. If you get a 3.5 gpa (according to the article) but fail these exams.... then obviously something is very wrong with the strength of that school. The exams aren't made to be amazingly difficult or challenging in the least bit.

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I have a draem that all are kids get learned and our allowed to walk.

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My education reform program:

1. Burn the entire rotten edifice to the waterline.

2. Start over with a program where kids advance through the system based on mastery of individual subjects, not their ages. If a kid flunks a subject, he takes the subject over again--not the entire grade.

3. Once a kid hits 14, give them an opportunity to take the trade school track. Learn to be a diesel mechanic or an electrician. Require basic English and Math to go along with the curriculum.

4. If a kid masters the entire curriculum by the time he's 12 or 14, send him on to college. Quit worrying about his or her social adjustment.

5. If a kid is disruptive in class, send him home. Make him the parent's problem, not the school's.

6. Execute any tenured teacher who consistently underperforms in the classroom. It's easier than firing them.

7. Execute any parent who misses more than two parent/teacher conferences.

8. Execute any politician who thinks that schools should take on societal ills through classroom instruction.

9. Consider a child of 14 to be an adult and treat him that way. If he wants to leave campus, let him leave campus. If he wants to skip a class, let him skip a class and face the consequences. Kids have a way of living up or down to our expectations of them.

10. Instead of saying the Pledge of Allegiance in the classroom every morning, have the kids say this instead:

"I do not have a right to a living. If I succeed, it is only through my hard work. If I fail, I have no one else to blame but me. My teachers are not here to spoon feed me knowledge. They only give me the tools with which to seek knowledge on my own. Only by having the right attitude can I hope to achieve great things. Otherwise, I'm just another pathetic loser doomed to a life of stocking grocery store shelves or emptying trash cans at 2 a.m."

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4. If a kid masters the entire curriculum by the time he's 12 or 14, send him on to college. Quit worrying about his or her social adjustment.

I had my first physics class at Auburn in the honors program with a 14 year old kid. Boy was he screwed up. If you think college freshmen are horn dogs normally you oughta see a college freshmen with a 14 year old's hormones hitting on the girls. Plus the little bastage completely wrecked the curve. The class average would be in the 60's and this kid is making 90's on the tests.

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4. If a kid masters the entire curriculum by the time he's 12 or 14, send him on to college. Quit worrying about his or her social adjustment.

I had my first physics class at Auburn in the honors program with a 14 year old kid. Boy was he screwed up. If you think college freshmen are horn dogs normally you oughta see a college freshmen with a 14 year old's hormones hitting on the girls. Plus the little bastage completely wrecked the curve. The class average would be in the 60's and this kid is making 90's on the tests.

And he was getting more than you. :big:

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Plus the little bastage completely wrecked the curve. The class average would be in the 60's and this kid is making 90's on the tests.

Enough reason right there for him to stay in high school. At least the ones that are college age and blow the curve are doing it to their own age group. When you are that young blowing the curve is just mean.

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4. If a kid masters the entire curriculum by the time he's 12 or 14, send him on to college. Quit worrying about his or her social adjustment.

I had my first physics class at Auburn in the honors program with a 14 year old kid. Boy was he screwed up. If you think college freshmen are horn dogs normally you oughta see a college freshmen with a 14 year old's hormones hitting on the girls. Plus the little bastage completely wrecked the curve. The class average would be in the 60's and this kid is making 90's on the tests.

And he was getting more than you. :big:

Did you not read the part about honors or physics or being jealous of a 14 year old being smarter than me? Have you not noticed that the best I could come up with for an avatar was a spaceship? Doesn't that just scream player?

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Well...The world needs Ditch Diggers too

"I've often thought of becoming a priest"

"Ahoy Paloy"

awknoonan.jpg

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Well...The world needs Ditch Diggers too

"I've often thought of becoming a priest"

"Ahoy Paloy"

awknoonan.jpg

I will be explaining to the boss what I was laughing at over that!

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4. If a kid masters the entire curriculum by the time he's 12 or 14, send him on to college. Quit worrying about his or her social adjustment.

I had my first physics class at Auburn in the honors program with a 14 year old kid. Boy was he screwed up. If you think college freshmen are horn dogs normally you oughta see a college freshmen with a 14 year old's hormones hitting on the girls. Plus the little bastage completely wrecked the curve. The class average would be in the 60's and this kid is making 90's on the tests.

And he was getting more than you. :big:

Mike, you aint right.... B)

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