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augolf1716

Unlike Urban Meyer, Gene Chizik really is a coach who quit to spend more time with his family

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I miss beating 'ole Urban (0-2 vs Auburn - including during one of their joke national title years). 

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1 hour ago, aucanucktiger said:

I miss beating 'ole Urban (0-2 vs Auburn - including during one of their joke national title years). 

How much fun would it be to take down Ohio State and prove that Urban has no answer for Auburn.

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2 hours ago, lionheartkc said:

How much fun would it be to take down Ohio State and prove that Urban has no answer for Auburn.

As much as I've grown to dislike OSU, very satisfying!

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20 minutes ago, Maverick.AU said:

As much as I've grown to dislike OSU, very satisfying!

 Indeed, it would be wonderful to post that famous comment "you can run but you can't hide" :)

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7 hours ago, lionheartkc said:

How much fun would it be to take down Ohio State and prove that Urban has no answer for Auburn.

Yes.  Yassssss.  And we'd have to be sure to have Cam on hand for that game.  Personally.  Since my dislike for Urban Meyer goes back exactly to that.

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I'm sure others on here like @bigbird and @corchjay can speak more knowledgeably about this, but it's a tough road for a coach because many of them get into coaching for altruistic reasons.  Sure, they love the sport(s) that they coach and love the competition, but what keeps them in it is that they see the positive impact that being involved in sports has on the kids/young men/women that they coach.  For many of them, it is a ministry of sorts.  The problem is, like many jobs, it can consume you and you can have your identity so wrapped up in it, that it's hard to fathom functioning without it.  

 

Too much of a good thing isn't a good thing.      

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On 5/8/2017 at 0:07 PM, WarDamnEagleWDE said:

FWIW, Urban didn't leave UF to be with his family. Urban had all kind of internal "workings" that pretty much made him leave. Personal and professional. He isn't a "good guy" as he is made out to be. 

I've always suspected Urban was a "front runner".  When he has the right toys and the competition is "light" he's real good.  But when it gets the least bit tough...

He's like that kid in rec league who's a real good pitcher during the reg season but when he gets lit-up in the all-star game he sits on the mound and cries for his mommy to "make them stop!"

No lie...I've seen that scenario more than once.

Urban fits that mold.  He's a punk!

Chizik, on the other hand?  Like him or not as a coach, I doubt too many will ever question his integrity and mental toughness.

Edited by AUsince72
To add something positive about The Chiz!
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7 hours ago, triangletiger said:

I'm sure others on here like @bigbird and @corchjay can speak more knowledgeably about this, but it's a tough road for a coach because many of them get into coaching for altruistic reasons.  Sure, they love the sport(s) that they coach and love the competition, but what keeps them in it is that they see the positive impact that being involved in sports has on the kids/young men/women that they coach.  For many of them, it is a ministry of sorts.  The problem is, like many jobs, it can consume you and you can have your identity so wrapped up in it, that it's hard to fathom functioning without it.  

 

Too much of a good thing isn't a good thing.      

It requires a lot of time but it's nothing like a major college coach that has lots of over night travels and recruiting.  Those guys entire life must be totally devoted to the sport.  They probably get 1 hour a day with their families and 1 "semi" off day a week.  I realize it's a dog eat dog world but that's why I'm not as quick as many to pull the trigger on a coach.  They sacrifice their entire life for their employer.  They are handsomely paid but can any one here say they would give up their life in this regard for the money?  I wouldn't.

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Also wanted to add the ministry aspect of coaching.  It's huge and if you're successful you can say most anything you want regarding religion.  My love for Christ is shown everyday I hope and I hope it shines through towards the kids.  

The biggest coaches that uses their coaching as a ministry in Alabama is probably the most successful in baseball and football.  

Two great Christian coaches, teachers and leaders.  Coach Josh Niblett Hoover High Football and Coach Jeff Mauldin at Hewitt-Trussville Baseball both have that competitive spirit and push their players but it's through love.  I know both very well and grew up with Josh (hell raiser as a youth/played travel baseball together).

Edited by corchjay
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13 minutes ago, corchjay said:

Also wanted to add the ministry aspect of coaching.  It's huge and if you're successful you can say most anything you want regarding religion.  My love for Christ is shown everyday I hope and I hope it shines through towards the kids.  

The biggest coaches that uses their coaching as a ministry in Alabama is probably the most successful in baseball and football.  

Two great Christian coaches, teachers and leaders.  Coach Josh Niblett Hoover High Football and Coach Jeff Mauldin at Hewitt-Trussville Baseball both have that competitive spirit and push their players but it's through love.  I know both very well and grew up with Josh (hell raiser as a youth/played travel baseball together).

Reading this article on Josh Niblett reminds me very much of a certain college HC we all love to trash and hate.....but from what I've read about both, they are very similar.  One has a "system" and one has a "process" both are very effective and successful coaches.

http://highschoolsports.al.com/news/article/7670162507739742952/what-makes-hoover-coach-josh-niblett-so-successful/

I knew Josh's hell raising days back in Demopolis many moons ago, he carried some of that over to Tuscaloosa back in the day.  Thank goodness we all grow up and mature ;-)

 

Edited by keesler

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12 minutes ago, keesler said:

 

I knew Josh's hell raising days back in Demopolis many moons ago, he carried some of that over to Tuscaloosa back in the day.  Thank goodness we all grow up and mature ;-)

 

I knew Josh back in his Coosa Valley days.  Josh, Tad, and their dad Dr. Niblett.  

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3 hours ago, corchjay said:

Also wanted to add the ministry aspect of coaching.  It's huge and if you're successful you can say most anything you want regarding religion.  My love for Christ is shown everyday I hope and I hope it shines through towards the kids.  

The biggest coaches that uses their coaching as a ministry in Alabama is probably the most successful in baseball and football.  

Two great Christian coaches, teachers and leaders.  Coach Josh Niblett Hoover High Football and Coach Jeff Mauldin at Hewitt-Trussville Baseball both have that competitive spirit and push their players but it's through love.  I know both very well and grew up with Josh (hell raiser as a youth/played travel baseball together).

That's awesome @corchjay

Another really good Christian coach in AL is Jeremy Perkins at Austin High (Asa Martin's coach). He is a great coach and a really good Christian guy as well. He goes to my "home church" (I'm in Vermont now).  During one service last fall several of his players came and shared about his influence on their lives and their faith. Unfortunately I couldn't be there, but several folks told me how awesome it was. 

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On 5/8/2017 at 11:07 AM, WarDamnEagleWDE said:

FWIW, Urban didn't leave UF to be with his family. Urban had all kind of internal "workings" that pretty much made him leave. Personal and professional. He isn't a "good guy" as he is made out to be. 

At least with saban, what you see is what you get. Urban is such a fraud in so many ways.

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What's the local coach count now?

Apparently for Auburn it is the X's and O's.

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On 5/11/2017 at 2:24 PM, boisnumber1 said:

At least with saban, what you see is what you get. Urban is such a fraud in so many ways.

That's not really accurate. Saban has cheated his entire college coaching career. When he went to a mostly level playing field in the NFL he couldn't cut it. When he couldn't beat the hurry up offense he whined about it and the SEC slowed the game down until he could catch up with coaches and personnel. If he had to coach college ball under the same rules as the rest of the SEC he'd be a mid-level coach. He is somewhat of a fraud also. 

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I had no idea Saban's whining to the SEC was what slowed down the "Auburn Fast" we all saw a few years ago. :-\

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On 5/7/2017 at 3:38 PM, AUIH1 said:

Chizik is a good guy and I totally agree with your post.  I dislike Urban far more than I dislike Saban.  

 

wde

I take great offense to this take!!!! lol BOOOOO!!!!!!!!!

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3 hours ago, keesler said:

I had no idea Saban's whining to the SEC was what slowed down the "Auburn Fast" we all saw a few years ago. :-\

Afraid we all just misunderstood the alternative definition of "fast."

While a bit off the original topic, I hope I'm catching a whiff of breakfast cooking.

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On 5/14/2017 at 4:42 PM, Tigerbelle said:

That's not really accurate. Saban has cheated his entire college coaching career. When he went to a mostly level playing field in the NFL he couldn't cut it. When he couldn't beat the hurry up offense he whined about it and the SEC slowed the game down until he could catch up with coaches and personnel. If he had to coach college ball under the same rules as the rest of the SEC he'd be a mid-level coach. He is somewhat of a fraud also. 

You missed the point. I wasnt referring to coaching ability at all.

Edited by boisnumber1

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I do not think the media trys to paint Urbs as this great wholesome aw shucks family man like they do with Dabo. The media knows all about his "alleged" affairs at florida with co eds. They know he is a very confident and downright cocky and arrogant coach. They just do not let them get in the way of how they cover him when it strictly comes to being a football coach. They just compliment his greatness which he is due. The man is a great coach. I cannot deny that. 3 national titles and he is 12 years younger than Saban. Unlike Saban he has won big at every stop he has been at. even bowling green and utah. The enemy of my enemy is my friend.

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16 hours ago, GwillMac6 said:

I do not think the media trys to paint Urbs as this great wholesome aw shucks family man like they do with Dabo. The media knows all about his "alleged" affairs at florida with co eds. They know he is a very confident and downright cocky and arrogant coach. They just do not let them get in the way of how they cover him when it strictly comes to being a football coach. They just compliment his greatness which he is due. The man is a great coach. I cannot deny that. 3 national titles and he is 12 years younger than Saban. Unlike Saban he has won big at every stop he has been at. even bowling green and utah. The enemy of my enemy is my friend.

One could argue that Urban's greatness as a football coach is directly tied to his competition. To me, you really can't discount the fact that, when things started to go downhill at Florida, he bailed. A great football coach would have turned things around, not jumped ship. It will be interesting to see what his legacy ends up being if Harbaugh ever builds Michigan back to it's full potential. Part of me thinks his "medical issues" will flare back up and he'll retire for good before it becomes apparent that much of his greatness is circumstantial.

Edited by lionheartkc

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38 minutes ago, lionheartkc said:

One could argue that Urban's greatness as a football coach is directly tied to his competition. To me, you really can't discount the fact that, when things started to go downhill at Florida, he bailed. A great football coach would have turned things around, not jumped ship. It will be interesting to see what his legacy ends up being if Harbaugh ever builds Michigan back to it's full potential. Part of me thinks his "medical issues" will flare back up and he'll retire for good before it becomes apparent that much of his greatness is circumstantial.

he already won 2 natties when he bailed. So I do not really buy that theory. It would look worse if he did not already have those when he bailed. 

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Just now, GwillMac6 said:

he already won 2 natties when he bailed. So I do not really buy that theory. It would look worse if he did not already have those when he bailed. 

He also never beat Auburn.  He won 2 nattys on the back of Tim Tebow (no he wasn't the starter in 2006, but he was the "secret weapon"), and the first of those was when bama and Georgia were both down. Once Tebow left, Urban was reduced to mere mortal at Florida.

Gene Chizik won a natty, Gus Malzhan was seconds away from one. Calling either one of them "great" around here can get you lynched.  

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2 minutes ago, lionheartkc said:

He also never beat Auburn.  He won 2 nattys on the back of Tim Tebow (no he wasn't the starter in 2006, but he was the "secret weapon"), and the first of those was when bama and Georgia were both down. Once Tebow left, Urban was reduced to mere mortal at Florida.

Gene Chizik won a natty, Gus Malzhan was seconds away from one. Calling either one of them "great" around here can get you lynched.  

well he won a third when his top 2 qbs went down at the worst possible time and beat saban with said qb in the natty semifinal. I do not get the poo pooing of Urban in here by some people. He is a great coach and fantastic recruiter. Georgia was not down when he got there. He had to face Georgia when stafford was there. Georgia was the same as ever when urbs was in the sec.

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12 minutes ago, GwillMac6 said:

well he won a third when his top 2 qbs went down at the worst possible time and beat saban with said qb in the natty semifinal. I do not get the poo pooing of Urban in here by some people. He is a great coach and fantastic recruiter. Georgia was not down when he got there. He had to face Georgia when stafford was there. Georgia was the same as ever when urbs was in the sec.

My question about his natty at Ohio State is, would have he even played for it if he had been in a harder conference? Sure they beat bama, but bama had endured a SEC season, while Ohio State beat a bunch of middle of the road teams, lost to unranked Virginia Tech, took 2 overtimes to beat unranked Penn State, and survived a comeback by a touchdown to unranked Minnesota. I have 0 respect for Ohio State, because they play no one, so they have practically a free ride to a shot at the championship each year, and they still cheated pre-Urban. Then Urban came in and pi$$ed on all of the conference's gentlemen's agreements about recruiting so he could build a juggernaut that couldn't be touched by the rest of the conference.

Oh, and for the record, Georgia finished middle of the SEC East in 2006.

Edited by lionheartkc

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