Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
StatTiger

Auburn's stingy defense

33 posts in this topic

With 570 yards in offense, the Rebels should have scored into the 40's but were held to 29 points. Of all the statistical categories, scoring is always close to the top of the list, if not the top of the list. With this in mind, here are the current top-25 defenses in yards to point ratio.

Rnk Name Gms Yards Pts Ratio
1 Auburn 8 2866 128 22.39
2 Texas A&M 8 3392 158 21.47
3 LSU 7 2197 105 20.92
4 Wake Forest 8 3032 146 20.77
5 Washington 8 2606 126 20.68
6 Wisconsin 8 2409 117 20.59
7 Florida 7 1676 82 20.44
8 Iowa 8 3019 151 19.99
9 Michigan 8 1850 93 19.89
10 Ohio State 8 2355 121 19.46
11 Appalachian State 8 2704 142 19.04
12 Troy 7 2641 139 19.00
13 West Virginia 7 2711 144 18.83
14 Northwestern 8 3330 177 18.81
15 Miami (Florida) 8 2831 151 18.75
16 Stanford 8 2847 152 18.73
17 Vanderbilt 8 3184 171 18.62
18 Nebraska 8 2737 147 18.62
19 Alabama 8 2196 119 18.45
20 Western Michigan 8 2824 154 18.34
21 Clemson 8 2539 141 18.01
22 South Carolina 8 3060 170 18.00
23 Baylor 7 2470 138 17.90
24 Boise State 8 3037 173 17.55
25 Ball State 8 3522 203 17.35

Auburn is No. 1 nationally with a point allowed for every 22.4 yards allowed. The Tigers finished at No. 37 last year with a point allowed every 15.7 yards. The current ratio means the opponent must gain 538 yards against Auburn just to score 24 points and 672 yards to score 30 points. If Auburn can maintain this ratio on defense, the Tigers will be difficult to defeat.

8 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites




Thanks stat.....a good report.   I don't get too choked up over the yards we allow....just keep them out of the end zone which AU has done well this year.

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

While stingy defense is the key factor that determines this statistic, other factors that will influence it are those involving the opposing offense's starting field position such as turnovers and net punting and kickoff yards,   

Edited by triangletiger

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
42 minutes ago, lionheartkc said:

Interesting that Vanderbilt has a better ratio than bama...

Yeah.

No offense intended, Stat.. love your work.. but how relevant is this statistic, really, if Team A has given up ~1000 more total yards (120+ per game more) and 52 more total points (almost 1 TD per game more) than Team B but is ranked higher?

Northwestern at #14 is even harder for me to grasp.

There may be a great answer to the question but I'm struggling to see it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 minutes ago, bryanlooney said:

Yeah.

No offense intended, Stat.. love your work.. but how relevant is this statistic, really, if Team A has given up ~1000 more total yards (120+ per game more) and 52 more total points (almost 1 TD per game more) than Team B but is ranked higher?

Northwestern at #14 is even harder for me to grasp.

There may be a great answer to the question but I'm struggling to see it.

I think it means that a team has to give up insane amounts of yards to give up enough points to lose. Since Auburn doesn't often give up insane amounts of yards, Auburn isn't likely to give up enough points to lose. 

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
23 minutes ago, bryanlooney said:

Yeah.

No offense intended, Stat.. love your work.. but how relevant is this statistic, really, if Team A has given up ~1000 more total yards (120+ per game more) and 52 more total points (almost 1 TD per game more) than Team B but is ranked higher?

Northwestern at #14 is even harder for me to grasp.

There may be a great answer to the question but I'm struggling to see it.

It factors in total defense and scoring defense because it is a yards to point ratio. Like any other stat, you have to consider the level of competition. A team like Vanderbilt is ranked higher than Alabama because they have not faced very many quality offenses.

3 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
25 minutes ago, bryanlooney said:

Yeah.

No offense intended, Stat.. love your work.. but how relevant is this statistic, really, if Team A has given up ~1000 more total yards (120+ per game more) and 52 more total points (almost 1 TD per game more) than Team B but is ranked higher?

Northwestern at #14 is even harder for me to grasp.

There may be a great answer to the question but I'm struggling to see it.

It doesn't mean much by itself; it's relative to the amount of yardage the team gives up.  If anything, it may be indicative of having a good defense in the red zone, but it also could be indicative of forcing the opposition to have long drives in order to score (i.e., the field position battle). 

Edited by triangletiger
1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's a statistic that can reflect other factors, including luck. But look at the top of the chart, and you see winning teams. So there must be some correlation with winning.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
24 minutes ago, StatTiger said:

It factors in total defense and scoring defense because it is a yards to point ratio. Like any other stat, you have to consider the level of competition. A team like Vanderbilt is ranked higher than Alabama because they have not faced very many quality offenses.

This is exactly what I was going to say.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It would be interesting to see these stats after we play UGA and Bama plays MSU.  The stats would include 7 common opponents and give us an indication how we would fair against Bama if we had no turnovers and the defense played it's average game.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, StatTiger said:

It factors in total defense and scoring defense because it is a yards to point ratio. Like any other stat, you have to consider the level of competition. A team like Vanderbilt is ranked higher than Alabama because they have not faced very many quality offenses.

Guess we will see how those stats stand up after this weekend when Vandy faces a more quality offense...!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, triangletiger said:

While stingy defense is the key factor that determines this statistic, other factors that will influence it are those involving the opposing offense's starting field position such as turnovers and net punting and kickoff yards,   

I see you are from the queen's city!  I am about 175 miles west of you in the mountains.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My family and I live in Charlotte, but are originally from Alabama.  I was born in Opelika and grew up around that area.

 

Western Carolinas, North GA, East TN is a beautiful part of the country.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Still not bad national stats even after the OM game:

Scoring D: 8th 

Total D: 31st

Rush D: 27th

Pass D: 73rd

Redzone D: 10th

1st downs D: 25th

3rd down D: 15th

Passing efficiency D: 31st

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, Maverick.AU said:

Still not bad national stats even after the OM game:

Scoring D: 8th 

Total D: 31st

Rush D: 27th

Pass D: 73rd

Redzone D: 10th

1st downs D: 25th

3rd down D: 15th

Passing efficiency D: 31st

 

Those numbers should get a 3 week boost before the Iron Bowl.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
30 minutes ago, lionheartkc said:

Those numbers should get a 3 week boost before the Iron Bowl.

No doubt. 

I think top 30 has been the magic number we've talked about all the prior years that we've been decidedly bad on defense. We will be right there or possibly well inside of that when we face bama. We have the football team we've wanted for awhile now. Man, this is fun. 

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bama's defense has given up 119 pts so far this year.....But the same defense has scored 56 pts on their own.  How does this factor into that above stats?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
21 hours ago, StatTiger said:

Auburn is No. 1 nationally with a point allowed for every 22.4 yards allowed. The Tigers finished at No. 37 last year with a point allowed every 15.7 yards. The current ratio means the opponent must gain 538 yards against Auburn just to score 24 points and 672 yards to score 30 points. If Auburn can maintain this ratio on defense, the Tigers will be difficult to defeat.

Interesting statistic there.  Do you have the same thing for number of points per play?  Like Auburn allows one point every how many plays?  I'm guessing we'll be near the top in that also in that it takes a team more plays to score against us, because I don't think we're giving up many big plays this year either.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 hours ago, triangletiger said:

It doesn't mean much by itself; it's relative to the amount of yardage the team gives up.  If anything, it may be indicative of having a good defense in the red zone, but it also could be indicative of forcing the opposition to have long drives in order to score (i.e., the field position battle). 

This^

Any stat by itself can be misleading. But they have a certain level of relevance. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

While I guess it is a good stat, I would rather have Florida's or Michigan's total yards and total points.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On ‎10‎/‎31‎/‎2016 at 3:54 PM, StatTiger said:

It factors in total defense and scoring defense because it is a yards to point ratio. Like any other stat, you have to consider the level of competition. A team like Vanderbilt is ranked higher than Alabama because they have not faced very many quality offenses.

So if you play a weak schedule with a high ratio, doesn't that somewhat distort any true evaluation of the strength of a defense for the purposes of predicting future outcomes?  I understand the concept, but if you have a "bend but don't break" D against weak offenses, you can't expect that to factor into any predictions of future opponents of higher quality.  It's an interesting statistic, but I'd have to see some results over time that support it being a good measure for rating how good a defense actually is.  I'm not disputing it, because you do an amazing job with stats...I just see some holes in this one.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0