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2-4-6-8 Who knows how to Litigate?


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http://www.clarionledger.com/apps/pbcs.dll...030103/60831024

It's not nice to fool with Mother Nature, nor the NCAA...

Judge rules in favor of Ole Miss recruit Powe

By Robbie Neiswanger

rneiswanger@clarionledger.com

OXFORD — Ole Miss football recruit Jerrell Powe was granted a temporary restraining order today by a Lafayette County Chancery Court, possibly clearing the way for the star defensive tackle to enroll in school and play football this season.

Ole Miss announced last week that Powe, a former Wayne County High School star who played last season for Hargrave Military Academy in Viriginia, was ruled ineligible to receive scholarship aid or play football at Ole Miss this season. That ruling came from the NCAA Initial-Eligibility Clearinghouse, an Iowa-based firm that certifies the eligiblity of all NCAA freshmen athletes.

Generally, to be eligible, athletes must have at least a 2.5 high school grade point average in 14 “core” classes, such as math, science and English, plus score at least 17 on the ACT college entrance exam.

Ole Miss did not say why Powe was not certified by the Clearinghouse, and Powe has declined interview requests.

Jim Carroll, Powe’s Jackson-based attorney, was not immediately available.

David Wells, the Ole Miss compliance director who works with athletic eligiblity, referred all questions to the Ole Miss atttorney Lee Tyner, who was not available for comment.

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IF any part of the "rumors" flying around about ole miss are even partly true, well, I would not push the NCAA's "buttons" if I were in those "shoes".

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boy,talk about idiots. just ask the bammerfarts about the payback from the ncaa after you show them up in court....ole piss had better win this year, because everytime coach orge goes to the bathroom in the future, there will be an ncaa guy watching to see if he unzipped in the proper manner

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Here is an update.

If they had worked as hard getting him an education as they did trying to get him qualified to play football, he would be much better off. How did he pass the ACT? Do you think Albert Means helped?

Ole Miss recruit Powe likely to enroll Friday

By Robbie Neiswanger and Rusty Hampton

rneiswanger@clarionledger.com; rhampton@clarionledger.com

OXFORD — Ole Miss football recruit Jerrell Powe was granted a temporary restraining order today in Lafayette County Chancery Court, possibly clearing the way for the star defensive tackle to enroll in school and play football this season.

Ole Miss announced last week that Powe, a learning disabled student who played at Wayne County High School in Mississippi and Hargrave Military Academy in Virginia, was ruled ineligible to receive scholarship aid or play football at Ole Miss this season. That ruling came from the NCAA Initial-Eligibility Clearinghouse, an Iowa-based firm that certifies the eligibility of all NCAA freshmen athletes.

Generally, to be eligible, athletes must have at least a 2.5 high school grade point average in 14 core classes, such as math, science and English, plus score at least 17 on the ACT college entrance exam.

Ole Miss did not say why Powe was not certified by the Clearinghouse, and Powe has declined interview requests. Powe met the NCAA’s GPA and ACT requirements, according to court documents. The documents say he made an 18 on the ACT and that his combined GPA at Wayne County High, Hargrave Military and through correspondence courses from Brigham Young University in Utah was 2.54.

Powe signed scholarship papers with Ole Miss in February. Most of the freshmen football players enrolled at Ole Miss in early August and began practicing with the team in preparation for the 2006 season, which opens Sunday when the Rebels play Memphis.

Powe was not allowed to enroll or practice with the team, pending certification by the Clearinghouse.

Lafayette County Chancery Court Judge Edwin Roberts Jr. said Ole Miss must allow Powe to enroll in school by Friday — the final day students can enroll for the fall semester. Roberts also said in court papers that because Powe has met the NCAA’s minimum requirements for academic eligibility, Powe should be placed on athletic scholarship and be allowed to practice with the team, in accordance with NCAA rules and the binding scholarship papers Powe and the university signed in February.

A hearing for a preliminary injunction is set for Sept. 11.

Jeff Alford, an Ole Miss spokesman, said the school will abide by the court order, even though under NCAA rules athletes who are not certified by the Initial-Eligibility Clearinghouse cannot receive an athletic scholarship.

“It’s an unprecedented situation,” Alford said.

Alford also said Ole Miss filed an appeal with the NCAA earlier this week on behalf of Powe, asking the Clearinghouse to reconsider its ruling.

“Coincidentally and ironically,” said Alford, “the NCAA was supposed to have (heard Powe’s appeal) this afternoon. Our understanding is, as a result of the suit that was filed and of the injunction that was ordered, that they postponed a decision on that.”

Jim Carroll, Powe’s Jackson-based attorney, was not immediately available for comment. But in requesting the temporary restraining order, Carroll wrote that Powe and his family made repeated requests to the NCAA to explain why he was not certified by the Clearinghouse and that those requests have gone unanswered.

Bob Williams of the NCAA denied that claim today.

Williams said that Powe was denied certification because of “irregularities in Jerrell’s high school course work and transcripts.”

Additionally, Williams said Powe was asked on “numerous occasions” to provide clarification and additional information regarding his class work.

According to court documents, Powe is a learning disabled student who made significant academic progress in the last year through the help of Ginny Crager, a Wayne County teacher.

In a four-page response to the NCAA, which had requested more information about Powe’s case, Crager answered a litany of questions, most concerning Powe’s academic acumen and progress.

Cragercould not be reached for comment. In court documents, Crager said Powe did not graduate from Wayne County High but instead received a “certificate” from the school. She said she and Wayne County football coach Marcus Boyles recommended Powe take Internet correspondence courses through BYU and attend Hargrave Military.

Documents show that from April of 2005 through May of 2006, Powe passed 14 BYU correspondence courses, ranging from reading comprehension to geometry. Each course was taken over the Internet and each was worth 1/2-hour credit.

The documents say that Powe was a special education student at Wayne County, “essentially a non-reader” who was able to complete the correspondence courses with help from Crager. The documents also say that Powe improved his ACT score from 12 to 18 because on the second test he was able to use a “reader” to help him take the test.

Powe and his mother, Shirley Powe, both provided testimonials to the NCAA regarding his academic improvement.

“Without the help of Mrs. Crager, who is a reading specialist, I would not have succeeded,” said Powe in court papers. “We worked on the Internet courses together. She read them to me and I was able to answer the speedback lessons.”

Shirley Powe said in the documents that as a single mother who worked to support her family she was not able to help her son with his homework.

“I didn’t know until he was almost finished (with high school) he wasn’t getting the education he should have gotten,” Shirley Powe said in court papers. “Coach Boyles and Mr. Crager helped him at least get enough schooling to be able to go to college. “Jerrell really is a good child but he just can’t read. Please give him this chance to attend Ole Miss.” :blink:

Ole Miss coach Ed Orgeron would not answer questions about Powe following practice today, but read the following statement: "The decision will be decided by officials outside the program. My job is to coach this football team and prepare them for the season."

http://www.clarionledger.com/apps/pbcs.dll...030103/60831030

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Why don't we give scolarships to every "good kid" who can't read?

An institution of higher learning isn't where you go to learn to read. What are the chances this guy will get anything approaching a real education at Ole Miss? Will he need a tutor sitting in class taking notes for him? Will the tutlor take his tests for him?

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Why don't we give scolarships to every "good kid" who can't read?

An institution of higher learning isn't where you go to learn to read. What are the chances this guy will get anything approaching a real education at Ole Miss? Will he need a tutor sitting in class taking notes for him? Will the tutlor take his tests for him?

there was a tutor that did it for d. irons.....

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d irons jr has a severe learning disability.

there doesn't seem to be a mention of a learning disability anywhere in those articles. those articles tell me that powe was just passed on though school b/c he was an athlete.

Here is the article again.

Ole Miss recruit Powe likely to enroll Friday

By Robbie Neiswanger and Rusty Hampton

rneiswanger@clarionledger.com; rhampton@clarionledger.com

OXFORD — Ole Miss football recruit Jerrell Powe was granted a temporary restraining order today in Lafayette County Chancery Court, possibly clearing the way for the star defensive tackle to enroll in school and play football this season.

Ole Miss announced last week that Powe, a learning disabled student who played at Wayne County High School in Mississippi and Hargrave Military Academy in Virginia, was ruled ineligible to receive scholarship aid or play football at Ole Miss this season. That ruling came from the NCAA Initial-Eligibility Clearinghouse, an Iowa-based firm that certifies the eligibility of all NCAA freshmen athletes.

Generally, to be eligible, athletes must have at least a 2.5 high school grade point average in 14 core classes, such as math, science and English, plus score at least 17 on the ACT college entrance exam.

Ole Miss did not say why Powe was not certified by the Clearinghouse, and Powe has declined interview requests. Powe met the NCAA’s GPA and ACT requirements, according to court documents. The documents say he made an 18 on the ACT and that his combined GPA at Wayne County High, Hargrave Military and through correspondence courses from Brigham Young University in Utah was 2.54.

Powe signed scholarship papers with Ole Miss in February. Most of the freshmen football players enrolled at Ole Miss in early August and began practicing with the team in preparation for the 2006 season, which opens Sunday when the Rebels play Memphis.

Powe was not allowed to enroll or practice with the team, pending certification by the Clearinghouse.

Lafayette County Chancery Court Judge Edwin Roberts Jr. said Ole Miss must allow Powe to enroll in school by Friday — the final day students can enroll for the fall semester. Roberts also said in court papers that because Powe has met the NCAA’s minimum requirements for academic eligibility, Powe should be placed on athletic scholarship and be allowed to practice with the team, in accordance with NCAA rules and the binding scholarship papers Powe and the university signed in February.

A hearing for a preliminary injunction is set for Sept. 11.

Jeff Alford, an Ole Miss spokesman, said the school will abide by the court order, even though under NCAA rules athletes who are not certified by the Initial-Eligibility Clearinghouse cannot receive an athletic scholarship.

“It’s an unprecedented situation,” Alford said.

Alford also said Ole Miss filed an appeal with the NCAA earlier this week on behalf of Powe, asking the Clearinghouse to reconsider its ruling.

“Coincidentally and ironically,” said Alford, “the NCAA was supposed to have (heard Powe’s appeal) this afternoon. Our understanding is, as a result of the suit that was filed and of the injunction that was ordered, that they postponed a decision on that.”

Jim Carroll, Powe’s Jackson-based attorney, was not immediately available for comment. But in requesting the temporary restraining order, Carroll wrote that Powe and his family made repeated requests to the NCAA to explain why he was not certified by the Clearinghouse and that those requests have gone unanswered.

Bob Williams of the NCAA denied that claim today.

Williams said that Powe was denied certification because of “irregularities in Jerrell’s high school course work and transcripts.”

Additionally, Williams said Powe was asked on “numerous occasions” to provide clarification and additional information regarding his class work.

According to court documents, Powe is a learning disabled student who made significant academic progress in the last year through the help of Ginny Crager, a Wayne County teacher.

In a four-page response to the NCAA, which had requested more information about Powe’s case, Crager answered a litany of questions, most concerning Powe’s academic acumen and progress.

Cragercould not be reached for comment. In court documents, Crager said Powe did not graduate from Wayne County High but instead received a “certificate” from the school. She said she and Wayne County football coach Marcus Boyles recommended Powe take Internet correspondence courses through BYU and attend Hargrave Military.

Documents show that from April of 2005 through May of 2006, Powe passed 14 BYU correspondence courses, ranging from reading comprehension to geometry. Each course was taken over the Internet and each was worth 1/2-hour credit.

The documents say that Powe was a special education student at Wayne County, “essentially a non-reader” who was able to complete the correspondence courses with help from Crager. The documents also say that Powe improved his ACT score from 12 to 18 because on the second test he was able to use a “reader” to help him take the test.

Powe and his mother, Shirley Powe, both provided testimonials to the NCAA regarding his academic improvement.

“Without the help of Mrs. Crager, who is a reading specialist, I would not have succeeded,” said Powe in court papers. “We worked on the Internet courses together. She read them to me and I was able to answer the speedback lessons.”

Shirley Powe said in the documents that as a single mother who worked to support her family she was not able to help her son with his homework.

“I didn’t know until he was almost finished (with high school) he wasn’t getting the education he should have gotten,” Shirley Powe said in court papers. “Coach Boyles and Mr. Crager helped him at least get enough schooling to be able to go to college. “Jerrell really is a good child but he just can’t read. Please give him this chance to attend Ole Miss.” :blink:

Ole Miss coach Ed Orgeron would not answer questions about Powe following practice today, but read the following statement: "The decision will be decided by officials outside the program. My job is to coach this football team and prepare them for the season."

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