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Drop Kicks at Auburn -- some gee-whiz history perhaps


BeasFan

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The thread on Steven Clark's ambitions, where I asked if we could get a list of noteworthy kickers and punters from the past, has made me curious if anybody can remember an Auburn game (or even the player) where a successful drop kick was made for points.

From http://en.wikipedia....erican_football there is

American football

The only successful drop kick in the NFL since the 1941 NFL Championship game was by Doug Flutie, the backup quarterback of the New England Patriots, against the Miami Dolphins on January 1, 2006, for an extra point after a touchdown.

Flutie had estimated "an 80 percent chance" of making the drop kick,[6] which was called to give Flutie, 43 at the time, the opportunity to make a historic kick in his final NFL game, the drop kick being his last play in the NFL. After the game, New England coach Bill Belichick said, "I think Doug deserves it,"[7] and Flutie said, "I just thanked him for the opportunity."[6]

The last successful drop kick in the NFL before that was executed by Ray "Scooter" McLean of the Chicago Bears in their 37-9 victory over the New York Giants on December 21, 1941, in the NFL Championship game at Chicago's Wrigley Field. Though it was not part of the NFL at the time, the All-America Football Conference saw its last drop kick November 28, 1948, when Joe Vetrano of the San Francisco 49ers drop kicked an extra point after a muffed snap against the Cleveland Browns.[8]

Dallas Cowboys punter Mat McBriar attempted a maneuver similar to a drop kick during the 2010 Thanksgiving Classic after a botched punt attempt, but the ball bounced several times before the kick and the sequence of events is officially recorded as a fumble, followed by an illegal kick, with the fumble being recovered by the New Orleans Saints 29 yards downfield from the spot of the kick. The Saints declined the illegal kick penalty.[9][10]

New Orleans Saints quarterback Drew Brees, a former teammate of Flutie's, executed a drop kick late on an extra point attempt in the fourth quarter of the 2012 Pro Bowl; the kick fell short.

The last successful drop kick extra point in the NCAA was by Jason Millgan of the Hartwick College on December 11, 1998, against St. Lawrence University.[11]

Would it be too cool if the AU kicking team worked up a drop kick play to pull on some unsuspecting foe?

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So a drop kick would be worth one point, right? If that is correct, I'm not sure for what reason that would be a positive thing to do..why not just kick the extra point in the traditional manner? They rarely ever get blocked.

What are the rules exactly pertaining to drop kicks?

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So a drop kick would be worth one point, right? If that is correct, I'm not sure for what reason that would be a positive thing to do..why not just kick the extra point in the traditional manner? They rarely ever get blocked.

What are the rules exactly pertaining to drop kicks?

That is a great question that I had just assumed was covered in that same Wiki article as

American and Canadian football

In both American and Canadian football, one method of scoring a field goal or extra point is by drop kicking the football through the goal.

The drop kick was often used in early football as a surprise tactic. The ball would be snapped or lateraled to a back, who would fake a run or pass, but then would kick the field goal instead. This method of scoring worked well in the 1920s and 1930s, when the football was rounder at the ends (similar to a modern rugby ball). Early football stars such as Jim Thorpe, Paddy Driscoll, and Al Bloodgood were skilled drop-kickers; Driscoll in 1925 and Bloodgood in 1926 hold a tied NFL record of four drop kicked field goals in a single game.[4] Driscoll's 55 yard drop kick in 1924 stood as the unofficial record for field goal range[5] until Bert Rechichar kicked a 56-yard field goal (by placekick) in 1953.

In 1934, the ball was made more pointed at the ends. This made passing the ball easier, as was its intent, but made the drop kick obsolete, as the more pointed ball did not bounce up from the ground reliably. The drop kick was supplanted by the place kick, which cannot be attempted out of a formation generally used as a running or passing set. The drop kick remains in the rules, but is seldom seen, and rarely effective when attempted.

In Canadian football (and, until 1998, the National Football League), the drop kick can be taken from any point on the field, unlike placekicks, which must be attempted behind the line of scrimmage.

and unless the rules no longer allow field goals to be done with a drop kick I would assume the 3-point option is still there.

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Rule:

Free Kick

ARTICLE 5. a. A free kick is a kick by a player of the team in possession made

under restrictions specified in Rules 4-1-4, 6-1-1 and 6-1-2.

b. A free kick after a safety may be a punt, drop kick or place kick.

Kickoff

ARTICLE 6. A kickoff is a free kick that starts each half and follows each try or

field goal (Exception: In extra periods). It must be a place kick or a drop kick.

Scrimmage Kick

ARTICLE 7. a. A scrimmage kick is a punt, drop kick, or field goal place kick.

It is a legal kick if it is made by Team A in or behind the neutral zone during a

scrimmage down before team possession changes.

b. A scrimmage kick has crossed the neutral zone when it touches the ground,

a player, an official or anything beyond the neutral zone (Exception: Rule

6-3-1-B) (A.R. 6-3-1-I-IV).

c. A scrimmage kick made when the kicker’s entire body is beyond the neutral

zone is an illegal kick and a live-ball foul that causes the ball to become

dead (Rule 6-3-10-c).

Return Kick

ARTICLE 8. A return kick is a kick by a player of the team in possession after

change of team possession during a down. It is an illegal kick and a live-ball

foul that causes the ball to become dead (Rule 6-3-10-B).

Field Goal Attempt

ARTICLE 9. A field goal attempt is a scrimmage kick. It may be a place kick

or drop kick.

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Drop kicks are cool, did it all the time as a kid. Football should be fun, think the whole kicking team would get a charge out of a drop kick. Cam Newton didn't need to catch a TD pass but it was fun. especially seeing it rerun on ESPN.

I say go for it. Anythiing that gets AU on ESPN would be good for recruiting. Afterwards maybe we can watch CGC dropkick cns in the pants again.

Little doc

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In Canadian football (and, until 1998, the National Football League), the drop kick can be taken from any point on the field, unlike placekicks, which must be attempted behind the line of scrimmage.

If this was allowed, that would make last second plays from out of field goal range more interesting when the other team's lead is 3 or less.

You could try to lateral until you get into drop kick range and try a drop kick then if you can't run it into the end zone.

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Today's pointed ball makes dropkicking very difficult while moving and if the kicker is standing still there's no advantage over a normal place kick. Like most kids, I tried a bunch of dropkicks and it's a fun thing, just not practical in game conditions.

PS:Years ago I read that while Spurrier was a player at Florida he practiced dropkicking in his spare time and wanted to try it in a game but his coach never allowed it.

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From the rule book:

SECTION 3. Scrimmage Kicks

Behind the Neutral Zone

ARTICLE 1. a. A scrimmage kick that fails to cross the neutral zone continues

in play. All players may catch or recover the ball behind the neutral zone and

advance it (A.R. 6-3-1-I-III).

Thinking outside the box here: Instead of using the drop kick on a FG or PAT attempt, maybe some enterprising special teams coach could design a play to make use of it on a fake punt play to directional kick it so that it's caught behind the neutral zone. It doesn't even have to be to an eligible reciever: "all players may catch/recover & advance." Line up Lutz as a tackle and kick to where he can catch it. The defense would never expect it.

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From the rule book:

SECTION 3. Scrimmage Kicks

Behind the Neutral Zone

ARTICLE 1. a. A scrimmage kick that fails to cross the neutral zone continues

in play. All players may catch or recover the ball behind the neutral zone and

advance it (A.R. 6-3-1-I-III).

Thinking outside the box here: Instead of using the drop kick on a FG or PAT attempt, maybe some enterprising special teams coach could design a play to make use of it on a fake punt play to directional kick it so that it's caught behind the neutral zone. It doesn't even have to be to an eligible reciever: "all players may catch/recover & advance." Line up Lutz as a tackle and kick to where he can catch it. The defense would never expect it.

That's some for-sure thinking outside the box! Maybe have several weird-kick scenarios in our bag of tricks and pull one out for each major opponent. Show Les that fake field goals aren't the only way to outwit and outplay.

And I like the idea that Lutz would be the key man. He's the right guy for it.

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