Grumps

Austin Wiley 2017 5* PF Enrolls at AU!!! (Updated 12/16/16)

250 posts in this topic





5 hours ago, JwgreDeux said:

Agreed, fast break opportunities primarily come off of turnovers and defensive rebounds. With His added rebounding and rim protecting we increase opportunities to run. Also, there is an art to an outlet pass, the pass from the rebounder to the ball handler that starts the break, and our current lineup is lacking there. If anyone other than Spencer rebounds they tend to dribble it up the floor. Passing is faster than dribbling. 

This was my role in 9th grade when we attempted to emulate the pace of then good UNLV. I was the 5, I got the rebound or the out of bounds pass after a make and I had the 1 and 2 at either timeline to pass to. The 3 was to sprint down the floor with the 4 and setup at the elbows. I was the trail and once the initial break broke down, I would trail in and find space. If I couldn't get the pass out to the timeline quickly, we didn't have a break. 

Edited by jared52

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1 hour ago, cole256 said:

I actually did explain it, it was a while ago when you and another guy mentioned not moving Purifoy to the 4'...But I guess you didn't see it. But it's all good. But you know how you have your favorite guys you shout out alot about recruiting like jonsey and kkloumbo (sp) or whatnot? That's how well I know basketball. But I guess I'm abrasive or whatever. But damn even metafor get love....

I just never saw you talk about Wiley helping the tempo with rebounding and blocks like JD did. My bad.

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Got to remember AW has just had one practice, I believe, with the team so I would expect to much right off the bat but you never know.

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4 hours ago, bigbird said:

🍔

That's awesome! 

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I'm interested to see how Wiley plays early on in our fast break game. 

Its much easier to mesh with the team in half court situations were you're coached on where you need to be and what your job is. But considering we do run a lot of fast paced transition offense, a lot of that is built on player chemistry. Knowing your teammates tendency to fill a lane/drop for a shot, knowing when his ball handlers will throw him passes, etc. Based on draft reports and high lights, it's seems Wiley is talented in those situations and will be able to contribute immediately on the glass and as a defensive presence, which we need greatly. It will be on our coaching staff to help him convert that raw talent he has into a solid and reliable post game before he becomes a consistent go to for our half court offense.

 

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7 hours ago, ellitor said:

I just never saw you talk about Wiley helping the tempo with rebounding and blocks like JD did. My bad.

Like I said I wrote about it not too long after you posted about Purifoy at the 4

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Looked to me that Wiley is a nice addition especially with Spencer on the bench for some undetermined period of time.    Mercer was a good game for his debut...had some good successes and should feel good about his play.  

Meanwhile, got hugely out rebounded by Mercer......just nobody really has a rebounder's mentality out there. 

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5 hours ago, JwgreDeux said:
Quote

 

When the NCAA contacted Auburn last Thursday to notify the school that it had deemed Austin Wiley eligible to join the Tigers’ basketball program immediately, logistical gears spun into overdrive.

Wiley, a 17-year-old five-star recruit who was originally slated to matriculate with Auburn’s 2017 recruiting class next summer, set out for campus and arrived in time to catch the Tigers’ 117-72 win over Coastal Carolina. The following day, he was officially admitted to school, and registered for the spring semester. He underwent physicals. Administrators, meanwhile, awaited word from the SEC as the conference completed its own review of Wiley’s eligibility.

In the afternoon, word came, and Wiley’s whirlwind day accelerated onto the basketball court, where he officially practiced with his new teammates for the first time. Auburn coach Bruce Pearl spent around two hours walking Wiley through the fundamentals of his transition offense. Assistant coach Chuck Person then took the 6-foot-10 center through the basics of the team’s defense.

Fewer than 48 hours later, with about 10 percent of the playbook flimsily hanging from his metaphorical back pocket, Wiley — less than a month removed from the first semester of his senior year of high school — scored nine points in 15 minutes in Auburn’s 76-74 victory over Mercer.

And then, finally, maybe, he got to savor a few deep breaths.

If Wiley’s timeline — graduating high school in three-and-a-half years, enrolling in college and jumping right onto the court for the latter three months of the season — seems out of the ordinary, that’s because it is. It’s almost unprecedented. And it prompts plenty of “whys.” Why would a kid choose to go through such a wild transition? Why would he waste a year of eligibility on half a season? And why is this even permitted?

In fact, when the possibility was brought to Wiley’s attention last spring, he was “blown away.” His initial reaction:

Wow, I could really do this?

Wiley was hesitant. “At first I wasn’t really on board with it,” he said Tuesday in a telephone interview. “Because I had to give up a lot. I had to give up the possible McDonald’s All American game, the possible Hoop Summit game, the possible Jordan Brand Classic game.” In order to graduate in three-and-a-half years, he also had to forgo his senior year at Spain Park High School and transfer to a Florida prep school so he could take summer classes.

But in discussions with his parents — both basketball standouts at Auburn themselves — and with Pearl and his staff, the rationale blossomed. Wiley, whom Pearl calls “a legitimate one-and-done candidate,” has NBA aspirations. However, regardless of the date of his high school graduation, Wiley, who was born in 1999, won’t be draft-eligible until 2018. By enrolling early, Wiley extended his stay at Auburn from 10 months to 15 at minimum, and expanded the cushion between high school and the pros — a cushion many, including NBA commissioner Adam Silver, believe is too thin.

In doing so, Wiley introduced college basketball to what he, Pearl, and and the director of Wiley’s Alabama AAU program, Jerry Bartley, all believe will be a path explored by other top high school prospects in years to come: the one-and-a-half-and-done.

“I do think that this is something that others should look into,” Pearl says. “Because it gives [players] more time to make that transition from high school to college, and then to the professional ranks. The way that we train, the coaching, the competition, all those things are gonna help him have a better second year in college, and a better first year in the professionals.”

Bartley also points out that players who might potentially be impeded by the NCAA’s academic eligibility requirements can use the summer classes to improve their grades.

For schools, the incentive is clear. If a player is unlikely to stay for four years, why not add a five-star prospect out of nowhere heading into conference play? Pearl admitted that trying to get Wiley acclimated before the Mercer game “was clearly disruptive in our preparation in the short term, but obviously in the long term it’s going to pay off.”

 

 

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A lot of the one and done type kids might not be able to do it academically.  They have spent so much time perfecting their basketball skills they have not worked on the academic side enough to be in a position to be able to take that many classes in the summer before their senior year. If you want to do this ideally you would take an extra class in the summer after your freshman year, another in after your sophomore year then would not need as many credits after your Junior year so it would be easier.

If this works out for Wiley I could see more kids doing it but by spreading out the summer classes over 3 years instead of one.

 

 

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it would be a slight risk for some talented kids.  Wiley had these going for him:  

  1. very talented basketball player
  2. apparently a good student because the ncaa and sec cleared him relatively quickly
  3. fore-site and planning by him and his family to put himself in this position
  4. went to a school that desperately needed a player at his position
  5. willing parents
  6. willing college coach
  7. and what i think is the most important thing that made this work ... both parents went to the college he goes to.  he has probably been to auburn many, many times through his youth and had an innate comfort with auburn that many new college students dont have. 

i think a lot of kids will try this and it will seem like a short term failure ... but assuming they are strong willed and talented, the full year of playing will still pay off.  i dont think there will be some overwhelming success rate with the first "half" year of this pending phenomenon of 1.5 and dones.

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On 12/17/2016 at 8:51 AM, JwgreDeux said:

Agreed, fast break opportunities primarily come off of turnovers and defensive rebounds. With His added rebounding and rim protecting we increase opportunities to run. Also, there is an art to an outlet pass, the pass from the rebounder to the ball handler that starts the break, and our current lineup is lacking there. If anyone other than Spencer rebounds they tend to dribble it up the floor. Passing is faster than dribbling. 

Bo Ryan had a great way of teaching this.  He would tell his team that he can get the ball down the court faster than any of them, they all take off dribbling and when they get to half court he would rifle the ball down the court.  They would lose the bet and run sprints and his point was made.  He would boast that he never lost!

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I know this kind of got lost in all the bad stuff that happened, but did anyone else see the fire he played with last night? That's the first time in a long time I've seen an Auburn Post Player back down a defender, turn around and slam it home with a foul right over the guy. I'm not sure if anyone else saw what I saw, but Wiley looks like he's going to be something really special next year.

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He's got a world of potential.  Needs to loose about 15-20 lbs but if we can install an offense that can get him the ball consistently, he should be a 15 points/12 rebounds per game kind of player next year.  And he needs to work on his FT shooting. He brings the ball all the way over the top of his head before shooting.

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Austin played well. Needs better hand work and conditioning. If he could add a little jump shot that would also be great. When he plays fearless he is absolutely dominant. 

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49 minutes ago, Hooverwareagle said:

He's got a world of potential.  Needs to loose about 15-20 lbs but if we can install an offense that can get him the ball consistently, he should be a 15 points/12 rebounds per game kind of player next year.  And he needs to work on his FT shooting. He brings the ball all the way over the top of his head before shooting.

No, he can weigh what he weighs, just needs to turn more of that baby fat into muscle.

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He has had good position plenty this year and even been wide open.  But,

Our other players have not gotten him the ball as much I would have hoped down low.

He also showed some stone hands on receiving passes in traffic.  Will be much better next year after a year of working together.

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51 minutes ago, Hooverwareagle said:

He's got a world of potential.  Needs to loose about 15-20 lbs but if we can install an offense that can get him the ball consistently, he should be a 15 points/12 rebounds per game kind of player next year.  And he needs to work on his FT shooting. He brings the ball all the way over the top of his head before shooting.

Doesn't need to lose weight he needs to turn baby fat into muscle, Off season conditioning program will allow him to get stronger and quicker, as another poster mentioned adding a short to mid range jumper will pay dividends. The other thing is multiple times last night I saw Wiley and McLemore with both feet in the paint arm up asking for the ball and defender sealed behind them and nobody passed them the ball.

Multiple times from both announcer and the SEC half time guys mentioned Auburn needs to find somebody who is willing to give up his own scoring to facilitate other people scoring I couldn't agree more.  I am really hoping Davion Mitchell turns out to be that guy or that Harper adds that skill to his repertoire. Auburn desperately needs a facilitator for this offense.

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Is Davion a distributor or a shoot/score-first PG?

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47 minutes ago, Tiger said:

Is Davion a distributor or a shoot/score-first PG?

Both but I doubt his shot selection is as questionable as Harper's.

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before wiley arrived, i thought he would get pushed around more by the sec bigs.  i was wrong.  he did a fine job.  my minor critiques would be his need to go up with the ball stronger, which as previously posted he did in this game.  he seems to have a decent vertical, but doesn't always show it.  improve his hands when receiving a pass (also already mentioned).  he seems to be ready for a lot of these passes, but they seem to get away from him some.  free throws, free throws, free throws ...

if he catches a few more of the passes down low AND he improves his FT's ... i think he would easily add 5-8 points a game based on FT's alone ... nevermind getting the ball more often or making more of his shots.

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I imagine Wiley will look a lot lighter on his feet next season too. It's tough to have no college-level conditioning and be thrown into the mix almost from the moment he arrived on campus. Then on top of that he was thrown into the starting lineup in his second game. That's just crazy. He handled it much better than I anticipated. Getting a year of off-season work will help him in being stronger with the ball and hopefully get more comfortable catching passes as well. But when he is in position and we actually feed him the ball there aren't going to be many bigs we face who will have the size and skill to stop him as he improves IMO

Edited by Tiger
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