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StatTiger

Early Notes on Auburn Run Offense

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2016 Auburn Run Offense

  • During 80 games under Gus Malzahn, the Auburn run offense has averaged 245-yards per game on 5.35 yards per rush.

  • Auburn has rushed for at least 200-yards in 55 of the 80 games (68.8%) under the direction of Gus Malzahn. The Tigers are 44-11 during the 200-yard performances.

  • The 2015 Auburn run offense finished at No. 35 nationally, the lowest ranking by an Auburn run offense under Gus Malzahn. During the previous six seasons under Malzahn, Auburn's average national ranking is No. 17.

  • Last season Peyton Barber became the tenth consecutive RB to rush for over 1000-yards in Gus Malzahn's offense. Jovon Robinson should be the next back in line to reach the 1000-yard mark.

Run%20Feature%202_zps04uzkf7w.jpg

  • Without a doubt, the running aspect of Gus Malzahn's offense is the heart and soul of the offense. Auburn's lack of offensive identity stemmed from the inconsistent play at quarterback during 2015. I expect Gus Malzahn to reevaluate his offense to secure some form of consistent identity in 2016.

Why the run offense will be better in 2016:

  • Gus Malzahn is dedicated to his run offense, sometimes to a fault. During his 135 games as a collegiate coach, his run offense has reached 200-yards during a game, nearly two-thirds of the time.

  • Jovon Robinson averaged 103-yards rushing during the last six games of the 2015 season. Robinson proved to be a more dynamic runner than Peyton Barber, setting himself up for a breakout 2016 campaign. Robinson averaged a 10-yard run or more every 6.9 attempts, compared to Barber's 1 every 11.3 attempts. Keep in mind Cameron Artis-Payne averaged a 10-yard run every 6.7 attempts during 2014 and Tre Mason also averaged a 10-yard run every 6.7 attempts in 2013.

  • Roc Thomas and Kerryon Johnson will provide the additional punch at the RB position. Thomas in limited action averaged a 10-yard run every 5.4 attempts and Kerryon Johnson showed great promise as a true freshman in 2015.

  • John Franklin III is the wildcard factor going into spring practice. Auburn's run offense under Malzahn with a dual-threat QB is an entirely different level. Combining the 2010, 2013 and 2014 seasons, Auburn averaged 291-yards rushing per game on 6.0 yards per rush. This includes 35 games of 200-yards or more out of 41 games.

  • Should Franklin win the starting role at QB; Auburn suddenly has the potential of increasing their running production by 38 percent. The combination of Franklin and Robinson in the read-option has great potential.

  • Auburn was No. 1 nationally in generating runs of 10+ yards in 2010 and No. 1 during the 2013 season. There was a slight drop to No. 8 during 2014 and a major drop to No. 55 in 2015. Cam Newton and Nick Marshall combined for 119 runs of 10+ yards and 191 first downs running the football. This equates to extending drives, which means more yardage and points.

Run%20Feature%201_zpsodo9oe9a.jpg

  • During the first seven games of the 2015 season, Auburn averaged 181-yards rushing on 4.0 yards per attempt. During the last six games of the season with Jovon Robinson as the primary rusher, Auburn averaged 215-yards rushing per game on 4.7 yards per attempt. An increase of 25-35 percent (dual-threat QB) added to the 215-yards per game would translate to a run offense averaging 260-290 yards per game.

  • The addition of Coach Herb Hand to the staff should be a major plus with John Franklin III at quarterback. Hand has been credited for adding the read-option element to the Malzahn offense at Tulsa, something he picked up from his days working under Rich Rodriguez at West Virginia.

  • Regardless of what direction Malzahn takes the 2016 Auburn offense, the key will be possessing an identity to build upon. Establishing that identity early on will only benefit the Auburn offense and team down the road. It appears Coach Malzahn has circled the wagons regarding his offensive staff, primarily to establish their offensive personality. The talent available in 2016 projects a return to the read-option attack with the return of a more vertical pass-offense. Establishing the run will also aid the two new tackles breaking into the starting lineup.

Thoughts?

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I have said it before, but I'll say it again -- that 2013 offense was the most beautiful I've ever seen operate.

If we could get JFIII up to the level of Nick Marshall running and passing, I'd be absolutely thrilled.

If we go with SW, I really hope we have him run the ball some.

I'm not a huge fan of bringing in a guy just to run the ball. I mean, it completely tips your hand. So, if we go with a 2-QB system (shudder), I think we will need to let JFIII pass and SW run, at least some of the time.

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I have said it before, but I'll say it again -- that 2013 offense was the most beautiful I've ever seen operate.

If we could get JFIII up to the level of Nick Marshall running and passing, I'd be absolutely thrilled.

If we go with SW, I really hope we have him run the ball some.

I'm not a huge fan of bringing in a guy just to run the ball. I mean, it completely tips your hand. So, if we go with a 2-QB system (shudder), I think we will need to let JFIII pass and SW run, at least some of the time.

Don't count JJ out of the mix. If he can capture the magic he had with the Memphis game, he could be a huge plus for the run and passing offense. If he can realize that he is bigger than most of the defenders he will encounter in 2016, he could win a lot of games for Auburn for 2016. I think that a lack of confidence in himself was a factor in his poor play those games he was the losing QB. It would be nice to see JJ run over Clemson's LBs & DBs if he wins the job for 2016.

However, I think that JF-III is going to push for the starting job and has a solid chance of being the starting QB.

Edited by doc4aday

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I have said it before, but I'll say it again -- that 2013 offense was the most beautiful I've ever seen operate.

If we could get JFIII up to the level of Nick Marshall running and passing, I'd be absolutely thrilled.

If we go with SW, I really hope we have him run the ball some.

I'm not a huge fan of bringing in a guy just to run the ball. I mean, it completely tips your hand. So, if we go with a 2-QB system (shudder), I think we will need to let JFIII pass and SW run, at least some of the time.

Don't count JJ out of the mix. If he can capture the magic he had with the Memphis game, he could be a huge plus for the run and passing offense. If he can realize that he is bigger than most of the defenders he will encounter in 2016, he could win a lot of games for Auburn for 2016. I think that a lack of confidence in himself was a factor in his poor play those games he was the losing QB. It would be nice to see JJ run over Clemson's LBs & DBs if he wins the job for 2016.

However, I think that JF-III is going to push for the starting job and has a solid chance of being the starting QB.

Agreed. JJ has all of the tools. Very gifted. Just has an issue between the ears. Needs confidence and a mean streak. Unfortunately it's harder to develop those when you are 22.

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  • John Franklin III is the wildcard factor going into spring practice. Auburn's run offense under Malzahn with a dual-threat QB is an entirely different level. Combining the 2010, 2013 and 2014 seasons, Auburn averaged 291-yards rushing per game on 6.0 yards per rush. This includes 35 games of 200-yards or more out of 41 games.

  • Should Franklin win the starting role at QB; Auburn suddenly has the potential of increasing their running production by 38 percent. The combination of Franklin and Robinson in the read-option has great potential.

1. Looked up the QB playing height/weights for 2010, 2013 and 2014 and JFIII: Cam - 6' 5", 250 lbs; Nick - 6'1", 210; JFIII - 6'0", 180. JFIII is 30 pounds lighter than Nick was! Remember how Onterio McCalebb, at 5'11" and 173lbs used to avoid contact and how we thought he might get killed turning it up the field? JFIII has 1 inch in height and only 7 lbs over Onterio.

Based on the above, I am a bit skeptical about JFIII being an every down QB, much less being able to finish an entire season being an every down QB. I just don't see how he could survive the hits. Therefore, it might be a stretch to throw JFIII into the mix with Cam and Nick right now.

2. Personally, I think speeding up CGM's offense by dropping the meerkat imitation every play and NOT substituting the run/pass/read option/sweep packages would generate substantial increases in running production based on the fact that CGM's offense runs best when it runs fast and confuses the defenses.

My $0.02

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One thing is for sure the Gus offense is much better when the QB is a run threat. I don't care who wins the battle before the start of the season I just hope he is a significant run threat and Gus is not afraid to cut him loose.

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  • John Franklin III is the wildcard factor going into spring practice. Auburn's run offense under Malzahn with a dual-threat QB is an entirely different level. Combining the 2010, 2013 and 2014 seasons, Auburn averaged 291-yards rushing per game on 6.0 yards per rush. This includes 35 games of 200-yards or more out of 41 games.

  • Should Franklin win the starting role at QB; Auburn suddenly has the potential of increasing their running production by 38 percent. The combination of Franklin and Robinson in the read-option has great potential.

1. Looked up the QB playing height/weights for 2010, 2013 and 2014 and JFIII: Cam - 6' 5", 250 lbs; Nick - 6'1", 210; JFIII - 6'0", 180. JFIII is 30 pounds lighter than Nick was! Remember how Onterio McCalebb, at 5'11" and 173lbs used to avoid contact and how we thought he might get killed turning it up the field? JFIII has 1 inch in height and only 7 lbs over Onterio.

Based on the above, I am a bit skeptical about JFIII being an every down QB, much less being able to finish an entire season being an every down QB. I just don't see how he could survive the hits. Therefore, it might be a stretch to throw JFIII into the mix with Cam and Nick right now.

2. Personally, I think speeding up CGM's offense by dropping the meerkat imitation every play and NOT substituting the run/pass/read option/sweep packages would generate substantial increases in running production based on the fact that CGM's offense runs best when it runs fast and confuses the defenses.

My $0.02

JFIII is listed at 6-1, 185 but is closer to 6-0, 190. Only time will tell of his durability but Johnny Manziel at 6-1, 200 managed to run the TAMU offense just fine despite running the ball 345 times during 2012 and 2013 combined.

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2016 Auburn Run Offense

  • During 80 games under Gus Malzahn, the Auburn run offense has averaged 245-yards per game on 5.35 yards per rush.

  • Auburn has rushed for at least 200-yards in 55 of the 80 games (68.8%) under the direction of Gus Malzahn. The Tigers are 44-11 during the 200-yard performances.

  • The 2015 Auburn run offense finished at No. 35 nationally, the lowest ranking by an Auburn run offense under Gus Malzahn. During the previous six seasons under Malzahn, Auburn's average national ranking is No. 17.

  • Last season Peyton Barber became the tenth consecutive RB to rush for over 1000-yards in Gus Malzahn's offense. Jovon Robinson should be the next back in line to reach the 1000-yard mark.

Run%20Feature%202_zps04uzkf7w.jpg

  • Without a doubt, the running aspect of Gus Malzahn's offense is the heart and soul of the offense. Auburn's lack of offensive identity stemmed from the inconsistent play at quarterback during 2015. I expect Gus Malzahn to reevaluate his offense to secure some form of consistent identity in 2016.

Why the run offense will be better in 2016:

  • Gus Malzahn is dedicated to his run offense, sometimes to a fault. During his 135 games as a collegiate coach, his run offense has reached 200-yards during a game, nearly two-thirds of the time.

  • Jovon Robinson averaged 103-yards rushing during the last six games of the 2015 season. Robinson proved to be a more dynamic runner than Peyton Barber, setting himself up for a breakout 2016 campaign. Robinson averaged a 10-yard run or more every 6.9 attempts, compared to Barber's 1 every 11.3 attempts. Keep in mind Cameron Artis-Payne averaged a 10-yard run every 6.7 attempts during 2014 and Tre Mason also averaged a 10-yard run every 6.7 attempts in 2013.

  • Roc Thomas and Kerryon Johnson will provide the additional punch at the RB position. Thomas in limited action averaged a 10-yard run every 5.4 attempts and Kerryon Johnson showed great promise as a true freshman in 2015.

  • John Franklin III is the wildcard factor going into spring practice. Auburn's run offense under Malzahn with a dual-threat QB is an entirely different level. Combining the 2010, 2013 and 2014 seasons, Auburn averaged 291-yards rushing per game on 6.0 yards per rush. This includes 35 games of 200-yards or more out of 41 games.

  • Should Franklin win the starting role at QB; Auburn suddenly has the potential of increasing their running production by 38 percent. The combination of Franklin and Robinson in the read-option has great potential.

  • Auburn was No. 1 nationally in generating runs of 10+ yards in 2010 and No. 1 during the 2013 season. There was a slight drop to No. 8 during 2014 and a major drop to No. 55 in 2015. Cam Newton and Nick Marshall combined for 119 runs of 10+ yards and 191 first downs running the football. This equates to extending drives, which means more yardage and points.

Run%20Feature%201_zpsodo9oe9a.jpg

  • During the first seven games of the 2015 season, Auburn averaged 181-yards rushing on 4.0 yards per attempt. During the last six games of the season with Jovon Robinson as the primary rusher, Auburn averaged 215-yards rushing per game on 4.7 yards per attempt. An increase of 25-35 percent (dual-threat QB) added to the 215-yards per game would translate to a run offense averaging 260-290 yards per game.

  • The addition of Coach Herb Hand to the staff should be a major plus with John Franklin III at quarterback. Hand has been credited for adding the read-option element to the Malzahn offense at Tulsa, something he picked up from his days working under Rich Rodriguez at West Virginia.

  • Regardless of what direction Malzahn takes the 2016 Auburn offense, the key will be possessing an identity to build upon. Establishing that identity early on will only benefit the Auburn offense and team down the road. It appears Coach Malzahn has circled the wagons regarding his offensive staff, primarily to establish their offensive personality. The talent available in 2016 projects a return to the read-option attack with the return of a more vertical pass-offense. Establishing the run will also aid the two new tackles breaking into the starting lineup.

Thoughts?

That is better than ANY article I have read this year!

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  • John Franklin III is the wildcard factor going into spring practice. Auburn's run offense under Malzahn with a dual-threat QB is an entirely different level. Combining the 2010, 2013 and 2014 seasons, Auburn averaged 291-yards rushing per game on 6.0 yards per rush. This includes 35 games of 200-yards or more out of 41 games.

  • Should Franklin win the starting role at QB; Auburn suddenly has the potential of increasing their running production by 38 percent. The combination of Franklin and Robinson in the read-option has great potential.

1. Looked up the QB playing height/weights for 2010, 2013 and 2014 and JFIII: Cam - 6' 5", 250 lbs; Nick - 6'1", 210; JFIII - 6'0", 180. JFIII is 30 pounds lighter than Nick was! Remember how Onterio McCalebb, at 5'11" and 173lbs used to avoid contact and how we thought he might get killed turning it up the field? JFIII has 1 inch in height and only 7 lbs over Onterio.

Based on the above, I am a bit skeptical about JFIII being an every down QB, much less being able to finish an entire season being an every down QB. I just don't see how he could survive the hits. Therefore, it might be a stretch to throw JFIII into the mix with Cam and Nick right now.

2. Personally, I think speeding up CGM's offense by dropping the meerkat imitation every play and NOT substituting the run/pass/read option/sweep packages would generate substantial increases in running production based on the fact that CGM's offense runs best when it runs fast and confuses the defenses.

My $0.02

JFIII is listed at 6-1, 185 but is closer to 6-0, 190. Only time will tell of his durability but Johnny Manziel at 6-1, 200 managed to run the TAMU offense just fine despite running the ball 345 times during 2012 and 2013 combined.

If the strength coach can get him up to 210 by kick off I will feel a lot better.

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