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53 minutes ago, PUB78 said:

Now Cole. Didn’t mean to hurt your sensitive feelings. It will be okay son.

I'm not your son. But yeah spoken like the typical southerner we know you to be. If anybody is in their feelings it's you. Nobody was talking to you but yet here you are...as a matter of fact if there is ever a discussion about race we can count on you to be there arguing that there isn't racism..... 🤔 wonder what that means 🤷🏾

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On 5/30/2022 at 7:51 PM, SaltyTiger said:

Give us some examples of this standard practice.

the caths have been hiding child rape and moving the people that do this to protect the church. this is fact. there are several documentaries on it. here is what one google story out of many says.....

What the data say about police brutality and racial bias — and which reforms might work

Some interventions could help to reduce racism and rein in the use of unnecessary force in police work, but the evidence base is still evolving.
  •  
 
A police officer wearing a body cam and riot gear in Atlanta

Body-worn cameras can increase the accountability of the police, but studies on their use have produced mixed results.Credit: Elijah Nouvelage/Getty

For 9 minutes and 29 seconds, Derek Chauvin pressed his knee into the neck of George Floyd, an unarmed Black man. This deadly use of force by the now-former Minneapolis police officer has reinvigorated a very public debate about police brutality and racism.

As protests have spread around the globe, the pressure is on police departments and politicians, particularly in the United States, to do something — from reforming law-enforcement tactics to defunding or even abolishing police departments.

And although researchers are encouraged by the momentum for change, some are also concerned that, without ample evidence to support new policies, leaders might miss the mark. Many have been arguing for years about the need for better data on the use of force by the police in the United States, and for rigorous studies that test interventions such as training on how to de-escalate tense interactions or mandating the use of body-worn cameras by officers. Those data and studies have begun to materialize, spurred by protests in 2014 after the deadly shooting of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri, and the death by chokehold of Eric Garner in New York City.

Government officials, academic researchers and media outlets launched data-collection projects around that time to better understand the frequency of police violence and the risk factors that contribute to it. From these growing data sets come some disturbing findings. About 1,000 civilians are killed each year by law-enforcement officers in the United States. By one estimate, Black men are 2.5 times more likely than white men to be killed by police during their lifetime1. And in another study, Black people who were fatally shot by police seemed to be twice as likely as white people to be unarmed2.

“We have enough evidence that tells us that action needs to be taken,” says Justin Nix, a criminologist at the University of Nebraska Omaha. “One thousand deaths a year does not have to be normal.” Since Nature reported last September on what the data say about racial bias and police killings, new evidence has continued to support a link. Data from California show that police stopped and used force against Black people disproportionately, compared with other racial groups, in 2018 (see go.nature.com/2bgfrah). A December 2019 paper reported that bias in police administrative records results in many studies underestimating levels of racial bias in policing, or even masking discrimination entirely3.

 

The data are still limited, which makes crafting policy difficult. A national data set established by the FBI in 2019, for example, contains data from only about 40% of US law-enforcement officers. Data submission by officers and agencies is voluntary, which many researchers see as part of the problem.

“Most agencies do not collect that data in a systematic way,” says Tracey Meares, founding director of the Justice Collaboratory at Yale Law School in New Haven, Connecticut. “I hope when people think about the science of this that they understand what we know, what we don’t know and why we don’t know it,” she says. “Policing, in large part for historical reasons, has proceeded in kind of a science-free zone.”

Bad apples

Scientists must often think creatively to work around the limitations in the data. Mark Hoekstra, an economist at Texas A&M University in College Station, has attempted to decipher the role of race in police officers’ use of force, by comparing responses to emergency calls.

Based on information from more than two million 911 calls in two US cities, he concluded that white officers dispatched to Black neighbourhoods fired their guns five times as often as Black officers dispatched for similar calls to the same neighbourhoods4 (see ‘Answering the call’). Hoekstra wonders whether the factors that contribute to an officer using excessive force might be predicted in a similar way to how US Major League Baseball teams use sophisticated statistical models to predict whether a player has the potential to be a future all-star.

Graphic showing the use of force by US police involving a gun across neighbourhoods based on racial composition

Source: Ref. 4

Scientists have tried to identify some predictive factors, such as racial bias, a bad temper, insecure masculinity and other individual characteristics, many of which can be identified through simulations already used in officer training5. Nix suggests that such screening could help with vetting officers before they are recruited. But raising the bar for hiring might be impractical, he cautions, because many police departments are already struggling to attract and retain highly qualified candidates.

Similar forecasting models could recognize patterns of bad behaviour among officers. Data from the New York City Police Department suggests that officers who had repeated negative marks in their files were more than three times as likely to fire their gun as were other officers6.

 

Such wrongdoing might even be contagious. Another study, published in February, looked at complaints filed against police officers in Chicago, Illinois. It found that although only a small percentage of officers shoot at civilians, those who have done so often serve as “brokers” in the social networks within policing7. Other officers connected to them were also found to be at greater risk of shooting.

But carrying out disciplinary action, let alone firing a police officer, is notoriously difficult in the United States. Union contracts give officers protections that have been tied to increases in misconduct8. In many states, a bill of rights for law-enforcement officers shields personnel from investigations into misconduct. “One thing we need to take a hard look at are those state laws and union contracts that provide either flawed or overly protective procedures that insulate officers from appropriate accountability,” says Seth Stoughton, a former police officer who is a law professor at the University of South Carolina in Columbia.

A woman holds up a sign of the victims during a Black Lives Matter protest in New York City

Massive protests after the death of George Floyd have renewed pressure to reform policies for US law-enforcement agencies.Credit: Steve Sanchez/Pacific Press via Zuma/eyevine

Lawrence Sherman, director of the Cambridge Centre for Evidence-Based Policing in Cambridge, UK, suggests that states have the constitutional power to license, or revoke, the power of any individual to serve as a police officer. “If a state agency was keeping track of everyone’s disciplinary history, they might have taken Derek Chauvin out of the policing business ten years ago,” says Sherman. Chauvin had received 18 complaints against him even before he put his knee on Floyd’s neck. “We monitor performance of doctors,” Sherman adds. “Why don’t we monitor the performance of police officers?”

Even officers who are fired for misconduct are frequently rehired. The police officer in Cleveland, Ohio, who fatally shot 12-year-old Tamir Rice in 2014 had previously resigned from another police department after it had deemed him unfit to serve. The Cleveland police did not review the officer’s personnel file before hiring him, The New York Times reported in 2015. An investigation of public records from Florida showed that about 3% of that state’s police force had previously been fired or had resigned in lieu of being dismissed. The study, published in May, found that these officers tended to move to smaller agencies which served a slightly larger proportion of Black residents, but with no significant difference in crime rates9. They also appeared to be more likely to commit misconduct in the future compared to officers who had never been fired.

“If an officer is fired for misconduct, or resigned to avoid an investigation, they shouldn’t be able to get hired by another agency,” says Stoughton. “This is a low-hanging fruit.”

 

Federal legislation introduced last month targets barriers to good and fair policing. One bill would effectively end the doctrine of qualified immunity, by which courts have largely prevented officers from being successfully sued for abuse of power or misconduct since the mid-1960s (ref. 10). A similar bill proposes a number of measures intended to increase police accountability, training and data collection, including a national police misconduct registry to keep record of when an officer is fired or quits. Although Democrats in Washington DC broadly support the bills, Republicans unveiled a competing, weaker proposal that does not address the issue of qualified immunity. This came on 17 June — a day after President Donald Trump signed an executive order that incentivizes police reform. The order drew swift criticism over its relatively narrow breadth and lack of teeth.

Robin Engel, director of the Center for Police Research and Policy in Cincinnati, Ohio, suggests that the real capacity for change is at the state and local levels. “There’s a collective citizen call to action now to hold political leaders responsible for ensuring that the police are collecting data, releasing data and operating with best practices,” says Engel.

Evidence-based policing

It remains unclear which law-enforcement practices are actually best, largely because of a lack of data and science. “We’re operating in the dark about what are the most effective strategies, tactics and policies to move forward with,” Engel says.

Political leaders and activists pushing for change in the United States have widely endorsed body-worn cameras, de-escalation training, implicit-bias training, early intervention systems, the banning of chokeholds, and civilian oversight since the tragedies of 2014. A survey of 47 of the largest US law-enforcement agencies between 2015 and 2017 found that 39% changed their use-of-force policies in 2015–16 and revised their training to incorporate tactics such as de-escalation. Among the agencies surveyed, officer-involved shootings dropped by 21% during the study period11.

“But as we have seen in the last several weeks — from Minneapolis and from the police response to the protests — there’s a great deal that still has to change in policing,” says Laurie Robinson, a criminologist at George Mason University in Fairfax, Virginia.

Researchers are advocating collection of better data, such as tracking situations in which force was avoided by de-escalation strategies or, when force was used, recording whether it was at a lower level than it might previously have been.

 

The Oklahoma City Police Department is among agencies working to fill that void. It now collects details on the applicability of each specific de-escalation tactic and technique any time force is used. “Since the implementation of our de-escalation policy, our use-of-force numbers have decreased,” states Megan Morgan, a police sergeant and spokesperson for the department.

The collection of data might itself hold police officers more accountable. In one study, a requirement that officers file a report when they point their guns at people but do not fire was associated with significantly reduced rates of gun death12.

The use of body-worn cameras could be among the easiest interventions to enhance accountability. The technology gained traction after a randomized experiment published in 2014 compared shifts in which all officers wore cameras all the time with shifts in which they never did13. The likelihood of force being used by officers with cameras was roughly half that of officers without cameras. Furthermore, camera-wearing officers received about one-tenth the number of complaints as did officers without cameras.

Results of more-recent studies have been mixed. When the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department in Nevada implemented body cameras, it experienced significant drops in both the rate of complaints and the use of force14. But when the Metropolitan Police Department of the District of Columbia did the same, it found no benefits (see go.nature.com/3heuxac). The differences might have more to do with policies that allow officers to choose when to turn on their cameras, as well as a lack of controls for situations in which one officer shows up wearing a camera while another does not, notes Sherman. The latter could dilute true differences in the rates of complaints or uses of force.

“It would be a travesty if we got rid of body cams,” says Sherman. “They very often help to clarify what happened.”

Evidence suggests that encouraging officers to listen to citizens’ views before making decisions and to generally demonstrate an interest in working with members of a community can be another effective intervention. A one-day training programme based on these principles of procedural justice — a model of policing that focuses on respect, neutrality and transparency — was shown to reduce both citizen complaints and use of force by officers in the Chicago Police Department15.

“If police are to be of service to communities, they need to build trust with communities that are likely to distrust them,” says Thomas O’Brien, a researcher at the Social Action Lab at the University of Illinois in Urbana–Champaign. His work suggests that such trust-building requires the police to both acknowledge its role in creating the distrust, as well as apologize for it16. Any half-hearted attempts at reconciliation could backfire, he says. Special training can be difficult, however, particularly in smaller jurisdictions, which have been shown to have a higher rate of police shooting civilians17 (see ‘Small-town problems’).

Graphic showing how he rate of police shootings per 100 homicides is much higher in smaller communities

Source: Ref. 17

In the wake of Floyd’s death, many calls for change have gone beyond police reform to defunding police departments — reducing their public funding and reallocating resources to other programmes — or dismantling them altogether. Some researchers caution against fully abolishing police departments. That could have “disastrous consequences”, says Engel. “It’s better to work within and demand significant and meaningful change, and then hold them accountable for that change.”

 

However, Engel does support proposals that would begin “carving off pieces” of law-enforcement agencies’ current responsibilities that might fall outside their expertise — or might not require an armed response — such as issues of homelessness, drug abuse and mental illness. In New York City, the police purview goes as far as to include enforcement of street-vendor licences. Across the United States, an arrest is made every 3 seconds; less than 5% of these are for serious violent crimes, according to the Vera Institute of Justice in Brooklyn, New York (see go.nature.com/3fbwmcn) .

Curtailing police encounters could also result in fewer crimes. Research published last year found that Black and Latino boys who are stopped more often by police are more likely to commit crimes months later18.

Stoughton also emphasizes the role of racial bias in society, as evidenced in the months leading up to Floyd’s murder by the fatal shooting of a 25-year-old Black man, Ahmaud Arbery, by two white men while he was jogging in Georgia, and by a white woman’s 911 call to falsely report being threatened by a Black birdwatcher in New York City’s Central Park. “I have become convinced that we do not have a race problem in policing,” says Stoughton. “Rather, we have a race problem in society that is reflected in policing.”

Nature 583, 22-24 (2020)

doi: https://doi.org/10.1038/d41586-020-01846-z

Updates & Corrections

  • Update 26 May 2021: On 20 April 2021, Derek Chauvin was convicted of causing the death of George Floyd. The text has been modified to include updated information on how long Chauvin knelt on Floyd’s neck.

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10 hours ago, PUB78 said:

Now Cole. Didn’t mean to hurt your sensitive feelings. It will be okay son.

he is right and also this is not the smack talk board. i am surprised you got away with it and i truly believe you are lying because that was a shot you took 78. and you know good and well calling cole son was another shot. if you are going to do it  at least be honest about it.

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19 hours ago, cole256 said:

I'm not your son. But yeah spoken like the typical southerner we know you to be. If anybody is in their feelings it's you. Nobody was talking to you but yet here you are...as a matter of fact if there is ever a discussion about race we can count on you to be there arguing that there isn't racism..... 🤔 wonder what that means 🤷🏾

Keep looking behind you and under your bed. Perhaps, one day you might find your imaginary buggy man.👿

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19 minutes ago, PUB78 said:

Keep looking behind you and under your bed. Perhaps, one day you might find your imaginary buggy man.👿

Let me know how your meeting go with the fellas! 😂

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14 hours ago, aubiefifty said:

this is not the smack talk board

It seriously should be moved there. Ridiculous

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The police chose DISHONOR!  Cowards! Afraid to confront the murderer who was slaughtering children. Children sending 911 calls to plead for help. Cops frightened to engage.

https://www.theatlantic.com/ideas/archive/2022/06/uvalde-police-robb-elementary-shooting-dishonor/661184/

They are happy to murder blacks -- afraid to try to save children.

 

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8 hours ago, AURex said:

The police chose DISHONOR!  Cowards! Afraid to confront the murderer who was slaughtering children. Children sending 911 calls to plead for help. Cops frightened to engage.

https://www.theatlantic.com/ideas/archive/2022/06/uvalde-police-robb-elementary-shooting-dishonor/661184/

They are happy to murder blacks -- afraid to try to save children.

 

Just so it's crystal clear what is intended, please clarify the "they" in your last sentence, which is demonstrably false and cuts the legs off of the earlier part of your post.

A. Uvalde police?

B. Texas police?

C. Every policeman and policewoman in the United States?

Just trying to see how broad the unsupportable absolute extends...

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13 hours ago, SLAG-91 said:

Just so it's crystal clear what is intended, please clarify the "they" in your last sentence, which is demonstrably false and cuts the legs off of the earlier part of your post.

A. Uvalde police?

B. Texas police?

C. Every policeman and policewoman in the United States?

Just trying to see how broad the unsupportable absolute extends...

Why even bother with that guy?  It’s a completely stupid statement and shows what he is all about.   He would be the first to call 911 when he is in trouble 

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On 6/5/2022 at 6:24 AM, SLAG-91 said:

Just so it's crystal clear what is intended, please clarify the "they" in your last sentence, which is demonstrably false and cuts the legs off of the earlier part of your post.

A. Uvalde police?

B. Texas police?

C. Every policeman and policewoman in the United States?

Just trying to see how broad the unsupportable absolute extends...

Thank you.  It is very important that we see reality objectively.  Binary thinking, emotional thinking is understandable but,,, not truthful.

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According to a report I saw in Newsweek about 200 blacks were killed by Police in 2021 out of a total of 1051 total people killed by Police. That makes up a higher percentage of blacks killed as blacks make up about 13% of total population so they are killed at a higher rate. Just in Chicago alone there were 747 homicides in 2021 with a large percentage being black. I don't have the actual breakdown of the 747 were black. The newsweek article did show that a much larger percentage of unarmed blacks were killed. 

https://www.newsweek.com/black-people-killed-police-2021-1661633

https://abcnews.go.com/US/wireStory/2021-ends-chicagos-deadliest-year-quarter-century-82032244

With all the Police in the US about 200 blacks were killed in 2021 most were probably legitimate shootings where the person shot was threatening the officer or another person.  I am sure some of those 200 were questionable as I am sure some of the other 1051 were questionable. I do believe that there is some latent racism among some police officers but just looking at the total numbers killed there is no way anybody can make a case that there is a systematic killing of black people by our Police departments.

I think we have a few issues with policing in the US. One we do have some bad cops and the Police departments do cover up for them at times. Two every time a black man is killed by a Policeman many assume the policeman was at fault even before the evidence is presented. I do believe there are a number of people amongst the police who are racist based on a different area where Blacks are pulled over for minor offenses (Often referred to the driving while black Syndrome) I speak to that Driving while Black syndrome from personal experience many years ago when I was living in Highland, Ca, I was part of a van pool that went from Inland Empire to the coast on a daily basis. I worked in IT I drove nice Pickup but not a great pickup and because I worked in IT at a laid back company I dressed vey casually. Me and another gentlemen met at the same parking lot every day to catch the same van. He was older then me he was a big wig at an aerospace company in Southern California, he drove an upscale car and wore a 3 piece suit to work every day and he was Black. The local police had him get out of his car multiple times while waiting for the van made him produce ID and explain why he was there at 4AM I was parked next to him and they never asked me. The third time it happened I got out and asked why they were asking him and not me and they told me to mind my own business. I then told them I had taken pictures of this three days in a row and if it happened again I would go to the local paper. I also called the police department the next day and mentioned that they had a problem.  They quit bothering him and never called my bluff I didn't have a camera as this was before cell phones.

My point there is some legitimate issues with some police but I have known an awful lot of policeman in my life who would have put their lives on the line to save a person and it wouldn't have mattered if the person was black, white brown or anything else. 

Finally one of the reasons so many people are killed in the inner city is because of gang related violence where the gang is protecting their turf and you are dealing with violent people. I am willing to bet a lot of the people that our Officers have killed among the 200 blacks and 1051 total people were involved with gangs and were armed. 

 

I am a great proponent of having officers having a camera on at all times also for recording from their car. I want this for two reasons to totally exonerate an officer when that officer is innocent and to help prosecute that officer when they have done something wrong.

The Newsweek article I referred to said there were actually 203 blacks killed by officers in 2021. There are approximately 1 miilion Police officers in the United states.

 https://usafacts.org/articles/police-departments-explained/?utm_source=bing&utm_medium=cpc&utm_campaign=ND-JusticeDefense&msclkid=15b7474c5e2c1fccb0d925d2d7b75096

 

1 Million Police Officers 203 deaths where if even 10% were questionable means you had 20 questionable death out of 1 Million Officers in a year across all of the US..  Those types of numbers don't point to a bunch of cops out to get Black people it might point to some bad apples.

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2 minutes ago, AuburnNTexas said:

According to a report I saw in Newsweek about 200 blacks were killed by Police in 2021 out of a total of 1051 total people killed by Police. That makes up a higher percentage of blacks killed as blacks make up about 13% of total population so they are killed at a higher rate. Just in Chicago alone there were 747 homicides in 2021 with a large percentage being black. I don't have the actual breakdown of the 747 were black. The newsweek article did show that a much larger percentage of unarmed blacks were killed. 

https://www.newsweek.com/black-people-killed-police-2021-1661633

https://abcnews.go.com/US/wireStory/2021-ends-chicagos-deadliest-year-quarter-century-82032244

With all the Police in the US about 200 blacks were killed in 2021 most were probably legitimate shootings where the person shot was threatening the officer or another person.  I am sure some of those 200 were questionable as I am sure some of the other 1051 were questionable. I do believe that there is some latent racism among some police officers but just looking at the total numbers killed there is no way anybody can make a case that there is a systematic killing of black people by our Police departments.

I think we have a few issues with policing in the US. One we do have some bad cops and the Police departments do cover up for them at times. Two every time a black man is killed by a Policeman many assume the policeman was at fault even before the evidence is presented. I do believe there are a number of people amongst the police who are racist based on a different area where Blacks are pulled over for minor offenses (Often referred to the driving while black Syndrome) I speak to that Driving while Black syndrome from personal experience many years ago when I was living in Highland, Ca, I was part of a van pool that went from Inland Empire to the coast on a daily basis. I worked in IT I drove nice Pickup but not a great pickup and because I worked in IT at a laid back company I dressed vey casually. Me and another gentlemen met at the same parking lot every day to catch the same van. He was older then me he was a big wig at an aerospace company in Southern California, he drove an upscale car and wore a 3 piece suit to work every day and he was Black. The local police had him get out of his car multiple times while waiting for the van made him produce ID and explain why he was there at 4AM I was parked next to him and they never asked me. The third time it happened I got out and asked why they were asking him and not me and they told me to mind my own business. I then told them I had taken pictures of this three days in a row and if it happened again I would go to the local paper. I also called the police department the next day and mentioned that they had a problem.  They quit bothering him and never called my bluff I didn't have a camera as this was before cell phones.

My point there is some legitimate issues with some police but I have known an awful lot of policeman in my life who would have put their lives on the line to save a person and it wouldn't have mattered if the person was black, white brown or anything else. 

Finally one of the reasons so many people are killed in the inner city is because of gang related violence where the gang is protecting their turf and you are dealing with violent people. I am willing to bet a lot of the people that our Officers have killed among the 200 blacks and 1051 total people were involved with gangs and were armed. 

 

I am a great proponent of having officers having a camera on at all times also for recording from their car. I want this for two reasons to totally exonerate an officer when that officer is innocent and to help prosecute that officer when they have done something wrong.

The Newsweek article I referred to said there were actually 203 blacks killed by officers in 2021. There are approximately 1 miilion Police officers in the United states.

 https://usafacts.org/articles/police-departments-explained/?utm_source=bing&utm_medium=cpc&utm_campaign=ND-JusticeDefense&msclkid=15b7474c5e2c1fccb0d925d2d7b75096

 

1 Million Police Officers 203 deaths where if even 10% were questionable means you had 20 questionable death out of 1 Million Officers in a year across all of the US..  Those types of numbers don't point to a bunch of cops out to get Black people it might point to some bad apples.

Murder is not the only issue though.

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Posted (edited)
On 6/3/2022 at 8:26 AM, aubiefifty said:

 

Graphic showing the use of force by US police involving a gun across neighbourhoods based on racial composition

 

I really, really like this graph.

If we only sent white cops to 50/50 black neighborhoods and only sent black cops to 30/70 neighborhoods, We would have 0% 'force involving a gun' incidences in a lot of desegregated neighborhoods in the country.

 

 

Also, using sarcasm cause this is 100% a 'smack talk' post by OP. 

Edited by Mims44
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Posted (edited)
54 minutes ago, icanthearyou said:

Murder is not the only issue though.

I agree it is much more complex. That is one reason I told the story about driving while Black.

I would bet a disproportionate number of the total deaths at the hands of the Police and of other cases of police brutality occur in our inner cities. Because certain areas of our inner cities have high crime rates and gang influence many of the Police who work there over time get stressed and similar to War Veterans come down with PTSD. Some time the PTSD leads to bad actions by the Police and it doesn't matter whether the Policemen are White or people of color. Because these areas of the cities have a proportionately higher percentage of Blacks and people of color then in our overall population that can account for some of the discrepancy in the numbers I mentioned in the Newsweek article in my original post. 

https://www.nytimes.com/2015/05/10/opinion/sunday/the-real-problem-with-americas-inner-cities.html

The article where i have posted the above URL explains some of what I am saying and goes into a lot more details then I have. I don't agree with everything in it but I agree with a lot of it and it is great starting point for a conversation. Sadly one thing in it mentioned that Obama should change some of the Laws to get a lot of young blacks out of Jail but that actually occurred later and it was Donald Trump who did it with bi-partisan support. It should have happened a long time ago as it was a law implemented during the Clinton era that caused a lot of the black youth to be incarcerated with Biden as a sponsor sadly also with bi-partisan support. We see some misguided attempts with new bail laws that just release criminals over and over.  I actual have a topic on this that we did need bail reform because the old system was like the old debtors prisons in England 200 years ago but the no cash bail even for repeat offenders was an over correction to a legitimate problem.

The area I agree most about in this article is we really have to address the whole Inner city issue lack of quality education, lack of jobs, lack of credit, gangs, drugs, violence, etc. In the inner city you don't have food chains like Kroger, Tom Thumbs you have Mom and Pop grocers where the food is more expensive and the quality is worse. The chains don't go to inner cities for a variety of reasons property is vey expensive cutting down stores margins, taxes are higher cutting down margins, higher crime so have to pay for extra security again cutting down margins.

 

Edited by AuburnNTexas
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On 6/2/2022 at 7:45 PM, cole256 said:

I'm not your son. But yeah spoken like the typical southerner we know you to be. If anybody is in their feelings it's you. Nobody was talking to you but yet here you are...as a matter of fact if there is ever a discussion about race we can count on you to be there arguing that there isn't racism..... 🤔 wonder what that means 🤷🏾

I've been thinking about his post. Absolute bull****. I'm sorry you have to put up with this. Thanks for hanging in and sticking around. 

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10 hours ago, cbo said:

I've been thinking about his post. Absolute bull****. I'm sorry you have to put up with this. Thanks for hanging in and sticking around. 

Bro they try to make it where it's so uncomfortable and you supposed to be scared to talk about racism......clowns man. It really shows why it's still so difficult out here. These guys are basically on some you guys are allowed in the buildings now, what else do you want? Be happy with what you have lol.

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6 hours ago, cole256 said:

Bro they try to make it where it's so uncomfortable and you supposed to be scared to talk about racism......clowns man. It really shows why it's still so difficult out here. These guys are basically on some you guys are allowed in the buildings now, what else do you want? Be happy with what you have lol.

It's hard to even understand what these people are thinking, but I wonder if they don't want anyone to acknowledge that racism exists because deep down they know it does and they simply like having the advantages. That's why people believe in this replacement theory garbage. The fear that the rights of non-whites are outpacing those of whites. Just the saddest, most fearful and ignorant viewpoint. 

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On Demographical Changes I do not support the idea that whites will become the minority at all, but I can see where some get their info from. It is a rule in economics that as populations become more and more wealthy, they have fewer and fewer babies. In Europe, the population growth in Euro nations is actually negative. As minorities climb in wealth, they too will opt to have fewer and fewer children. It just happens. No one today focusing on future demographics is compensating for this in their numbers projections.

Since 1993, there have academic reports and books, and articles published on "the looming Democratic Demographic Shift."

Wait, Not THAT Emerging Democratic Majority! - The American Prospect

During some of the darkest days of the George W. Bush era, liberals contented themselves with one particular certainty: It was just a matter of time. Thanks to demographics, the GOP’s stranglehold on the presidency, the Senate, and the House would all eventually be broken. The country was getting younger and browner, and the Republican coalition of old white conservatives, increasingly cohered by racist messaging, could not hold. The GOP was on the edge of collapse, its support aging out and dying off. If the Democratic Party could get those young people and people of color to vote, they could win.

Why the Announcement of a Looming White Minority Makes Demographers Nervous - The New York Times (nytimes.com)

America’s electoral future: The coming generational transformation (brookings.edu)

One of the books that started this all. The first books were published in 1993. 

The Emerging Democratic Majority: Judis, John B.: 9780743254786: Amazon.com: Books

The Emerging Democratic Majority Turns 10 - The Atlantic

The US will become ‘minority white’ in 2045, Census projects (brookings.edu)

The coming reactions to minority white demographics.

Views of demographic changes in America | Pew Research Center

What a declining white majority means for the 2040 workforce (fastcompany.com)

America’s White Majority Is Declining. How Will Power Shift, and in Whose Favor? (dcpofficial.com)

 

 

 

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On 6/8/2022 at 5:23 PM, cbo said:

It's hard to even understand what these people are thinking, but I wonder if they don't want anyone to acknowledge that racism exists because deep down they know it does and they simply like having the advantages. That's why people believe in this replacement theory garbage. The fear that the rights of non-whites are outpacing those of whites. Just the saddest, most fearful and ignorant viewpoint. 

I think it's the wanting to pretend that their ancestors were the greatest of great men and not wanting to look in the mirror and see who their mothers and fathers really were. Their entire family reputation and things that they have would be proven to be a sham

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One thing to remember.  Cops are human. Good and bad just like in every other walk of life. To me it's simple. Like it or not cops have authority.  If  a CEO of a company is pulled over by a cop making 15.00 an hr, that cop has authority over him. Do what the cop says and in most, if not all cases it comes out with no one getting hurt. 

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On 6/19/2022 at 10:12 AM, NWALA Tiger said:

One thing to remember.  Cops are human. Good and bad just like in every other walk of life. To me it's simple. Like it or not cops have authority.  If  a CEO of a company is pulled over by a cop making 15.00 an hr, that cop has authority over him. Do what the cop says and in most, if not all cases it comes out with no one getting hurt. 

Why the facepalm? What of my statement do u not agree with

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58 minutes ago, NWALA Tiger said:

Why the facepalm? What of my statement do u not agree with

I believe in justice, authority without justice, a sense of humanity,  is illegitimate.  Allegiance should be given to the ideas of truth and justice.  To submit to a corrupt symbol would defy that belief.

I believe most of our police officers are good, decent people.  I believe they are grotesquely underpaid.  However, there are too many bad officers hiding in their ranks who need to be identified and dismissed.

Edited by icanthearyou
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40 minutes ago, NWALA Tiger said:

Why the facepalm? What of my statement do u not agree with

Lol….that’s a rookie question…..it’s ICHY, get used to them……

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