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HAYinthemiddleoftheBARN

Krista has silenced some critics

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My oldest son was, I believe, 11 years old and played YMCA football in Montgomery. In the last game of the season, his team was playing to qualify to go to Cramton Bowl for a Saturday extravaganza as one of the top two teams in their age group.

The other team had fourth down inside the 5 in the final minute or so of the game. Ben tackled the runner short of the goal line and it seemed the game was over. Alas, there was a flag. Ben Marshall was offsides. On the next play, the other team scored and won the game.

I saw Ben get hit in the face with a fastball that turned his eye purple and refuse to leave a game. I saw him get all kinds of bruises as a catcher. I saw him take big hits in football that left him gasping for breath. That day was the only time I ever saw him cry because of an athletic event. He started to walk off the field and sank to his knees, sobbing. His teammates helped him to his feet.

Not one person said a derogatory word. If someone had and I had heard it, I don’t know what I would have done.

That game, of course, didn’t matter to anybody beyond the players and their coaches and the few dozen people who were there to support their children. I was reminded of that day when Krista Nix, mother of Bo, posted an extraordinarily gracious message on Facebook.

[/quote}

read the rest here:

http://247sports.com/college/auburn/Article/PMARSHONAU-Krista-Nix-mother-of-Bo-rises-above-the-noise-136714869/

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My oldest son was, I believe, 11 years old and played YMCA football in Montgomery. In the last game of the season, his team was playing to qualify to go to Cramton Bowl for a Saturday extravaganza as one of the top two teams in their age group.

The other team had fourth down inside the 5 in the final minute or so of the game. Ben tackled the runner short of the goal line and it seemed the game was over. Alas, there was a flag. Ben Marshall was offsides. On the next play, the other team scored and won the game.

I saw Ben get hit in the face with a fastball that turned his eye purple and refuse to leave a game. I saw him get all kinds of bruises as a catcher. I saw him take big hits in football that left him gasping for breath. That day was the only time I ever saw him cry because of an athletic event. He started to walk off the field and sank to his knees, sobbing. His teammates helped him to his feet.

Not one person said a derogatory word. If someone had and I had heard it, I don’t know what I would have done.

That game, of course, didn’t matter to anybody beyond the players and their coaches and the few dozen people who were there to support their children. I was reminded of that day when Krista Nix, mother of Bo, posted an extraordinarily gracious message on Facebook.

 

Bo Nix and others who compete for Auburn are uniquely talented, and they have earned unique opportunities. Ten days ago, he was everybody’s hero after a huge game against Mississippi State. Last Saturday, he was the subject of ridicule and scorn when he struggled mightily in a 24-13 loss at Florida.

That’s nothing new to the Nix family. Patrick Nix was an Auburn quarterback 25 years ago. He’s been a college position coach, a college offensive coordinator and a championship-winning high school coach. Conrad Nix, a renowned high school coach, is the man who started it all. Krista Nix has supported her men in good times and bad.

It’s sad that adults can be reduced to bashing a young man still a teen-ager because they wanted him to play football better, that they can dismiss everything good he’s done and call for him to be replaced because he had a bad day. That, sadly, is part of the modern fabric of college football.

Bo Nix handled the questions like a champion in the aftermath of a day he never wanted to experience and didn’t expect to experience. He was taught well. In the few minutes it took her to put her feelings into words, his mother rose above the noise, above those who would criticize her son for not doing things they could never dream of doing themselves.

“His stuff is more in the limelight because of who he is and what he does,” senior defensive tackle Derrick Brown said. “People comment on it, but they can’t get out there and do it.”

There’ll be great days, good days and probably more bad days for Bo Nix in his time at Auburn. Such is the life he has chosen. His family will experience those times of joy and time of pain with him.

51COMMENTS

“Bo is our guy,” senior Auburn running back Kam Martin said. “…Bo is a true winner. He’s a tough kid and he wants to get better. He’s going to.”

It’s a family thing.

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2 minutes ago, HAYinthemiddleoftheBARN said:

I don't ever post topics (not savvy) so not sure how to display the material other than the link...{I need my teen & she's not here}

I got you

“My oldest son was, I believe, 11 years old and played YMCA football in Montgomery. In the last game of the season, his team was playing to qualify to go to Cramton Bowl for a Saturday extravaganza as one of the top two teams in their age group.

The other team had fourth down inside the 5 in the final minute or so of the game. Ben tackled the runner short of the goal line and it seemed the game was over. Alas, there was a flag. Ben Marshall was offsides. On the next play, the other team scored and won the game.

I saw Ben get hit in the face with a fastball that turned his eye purple and refuse to leave a game. I saw him get all kinds of bruises as a catcher. I saw him take big hits in football that left him gasping for breath. That day was the only time I ever saw him cry because of an athletic event. He started to walk off the field and sank to his knees, sobbing. His teammates helped him to his feet.

Not one person said a derogatory word. If someone had and I had heard it, I don’t know what I would have done.

That game, of course, didn’t matter to anybody beyond the players and their coaches and the few dozen people who were there to support their children. I was reminded of that day when Krista Nix, mother of Bo, posted an extraordinarily gracious message on Facebook.

Bo Nix and others who compete for Auburn are uniquely talented, and they have earned unique opportunities. Ten days ago, he was everybody’s hero after a huge game against Mississippi State. Last Saturday, he was the subject of ridicule and scorn when he struggled mightily in a 24-13 loss at Florida.

That’s nothing new to the Nix family. Patrick Nix was an Auburn quarterback 25 years ago. He’s been a college position coach, a college offensive coordinator and a championship-winning high school coach. Conrad Nix, a renowned high school coach, is the man who started it all. Krista Nix has supported her men in good times and bad.

It’s sad that adults can be reduced to bashing a young man still a teen-ager because they wanted him to play football better, that they can dismiss everything good he’s done and call for him to be replaced because he had a bad day. That, sadly, is part of the modern fabric of college football.

Bo Nix handled the questions like a champion in the aftermath of a day he never wanted to experience and didn’t expect to experience. He was taught well. In the few minutes it took her to put her feelings into words, his mother rose above the noise, above those who would criticize her son for not doing things they could never dream of doing themselves.

“His stuff is more in the limelight because of who he is and what he does,” senior defensive tackle Derrick Brown said. “People comment on it, but they can’t get out there and do it.”

There’ll be great days, good days and probably more bad days for Bo Nix in his time at Auburn. Such is the life he has chosen. His family will experience those times of joy and time of pain with him.

51COMMENTS

“Bo is our guy,” senior Auburn running back Kam Martin said. “…Bo is a true winner. He’s a tough kid and he wants to get better. He’s going to.”

It’s a family thing.”

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17 minutes ago, augolf1716 said:

My oldest son was, I believe, 11 years old and played YMCA football in Montgomery. In the last game of the season, his team was playing to qualify to go to Cramton Bowl for a Saturday extravaganza as one of the top two teams in their age group.

The other team had fourth down inside the 5 in the final minute or so of the game. Ben tackled the runner short of the goal line and it seemed the game was over. Alas, there was a flag. Ben Marshall was offsides. On the next play, the other team scored and won the game.

I saw Ben get hit in the face with a fastball that turned his eye purple and refuse to leave a game. I saw him get all kinds of bruises as a catcher. I saw him take big hits in football that left him gasping for breath. That day was the only time I ever saw him cry because of an athletic event. He started to walk off the field and sank to his knees, sobbing. His teammates helped him to his feet.

Not one person said a derogatory word. If someone had and I had heard it, I don’t know what I would have done.

That game, of course, didn’t matter to anybody beyond the players and their coaches and the few dozen people who were there to support their children. I was reminded of that day when Krista Nix, mother of Bo, posted an extraordinarily gracious message on Facebook.

 

Bo Nix and others who compete for Auburn are uniquely talented, and they have earned unique opportunities. Ten days ago, he was everybody’s hero after a huge game against Mississippi State. Last Saturday, he was the subject of ridicule and scorn when he struggled mightily in a 24-13 loss at Florida.

That’s nothing new to the Nix family. Patrick Nix was an Auburn quarterback 25 years ago. He’s been a college position coach, a college offensive coordinator and a championship-winning high school coach. Conrad Nix, a renowned high school coach, is the man who started it all. Krista Nix has supported her men in good times and bad.

It’s sad that adults can be reduced to bashing a young man still a teen-ager because they wanted him to play football better, that they can dismiss everything good he’s done and call for him to be replaced because he had a bad day. That, sadly, is part of the modern fabric of college football.

Bo Nix handled the questions like a champion in the aftermath of a day he never wanted to experience and didn’t expect to experience. He was taught well. In the few minutes it took her to put her feelings into words, his mother rose above the noise, above those who would criticize her son for not doing things they could never dream of doing themselves.

“His stuff is more in the limelight because of who he is and what he does,” senior defensive tackle Derrick Brown said. “People comment on it, but they can’t get out there and do it.”

There’ll be great days, good days and probably more bad days for Bo Nix in his time at Auburn. Such is the life he has chosen. His family will experience those times of joy and time of pain with him.

51COMMENTS

“Bo is our guy,” senior Auburn running back Kam Martin said. “…Bo is a true winner. He’s a tough kid and he wants to get better. He’s going to.”

It’s a family thing.

This is the absolute best post I have read in quite some time. Bo IS Auburn through and through. I am extremely proud he is an Auburn Tiger. I am even more proud that he has THE platform to be the Face of the program. 

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32 minutes ago, augolf1716 said:

My oldest son was, I believe, 11 years old and played YMCA football in Montgomery. In the last game of the season, his team was playing to qualify to go to Cramton Bowl for a Saturday extravaganza as one of the top two teams in their age group.

The other team had fourth down inside the 5 in the final minute or so of the game. Ben tackled the runner short of the goal line and it seemed the game was over. Alas, there was a flag. Ben Marshall was offsides. On the next play, the other team scored and won the game.

I saw Ben get hit in the face with a fastball that turned his eye purple and refuse to leave a game. I saw him get all kinds of bruises as a catcher. I saw him take big hits in football that left him gasping for breath. That day was the only time I ever saw him cry because of an athletic event. He started to walk off the field and sank to his knees, sobbing. His teammates helped him to his feet.

Not one person said a derogatory word. If someone had and I had heard it, I don’t know what I would have done.

That game, of course, didn’t matter to anybody beyond the players and their coaches and the few dozen people who were there to support their children. I was reminded of that day when Krista Nix, mother of Bo, posted an extraordinarily gracious message on Facebook.

 

Bo Nix and others who compete for Auburn are uniquely talented, and they have earned unique opportunities. Ten days ago, he was everybody’s hero after a huge game against Mississippi State. Last Saturday, he was the subject of ridicule and scorn when he struggled mightily in a 24-13 loss at Florida.

That’s nothing new to the Nix family. Patrick Nix was an Auburn quarterback 25 years ago. He’s been a college position coach, a college offensive coordinator and a championship-winning high school coach. Conrad Nix, a renowned high school coach, is the man who started it all. Krista Nix has supported her men in good times and bad.

It’s sad that adults can be reduced to bashing a young man still a teen-ager because they wanted him to play football better, that they can dismiss everything good he’s done and call for him to be replaced because he had a bad day. That, sadly, is part of the modern fabric of college football.

Bo Nix handled the questions like a champion in the aftermath of a day he never wanted to experience and didn’t expect to experience. He was taught well. In the few minutes it took her to put her feelings into words, his mother rose above the noise, above those who would criticize her son for not doing things they could never dream of doing themselves.

“His stuff is more in the limelight because of who he is and what he does,” senior defensive tackle Derrick Brown said. “People comment on it, but they can’t get out there and do it.”

There’ll be great days, good days and probably more bad days for Bo Nix in his time at Auburn. Such is the life he has chosen. His family will experience those times of joy and time of pain with him.

51COMMENTS

“Bo is our guy,” senior Auburn running back Kam Martin said. “…Bo is a true winner. He’s a tough kid and he wants to get better. He’s going to.”

It’s a family thing.

 

32 minutes ago, Zeek said:

I got you

“My oldest son was, I believe, 11 years old and played YMCA football in Montgomery. In the last game of the season, his team was playing to qualify to go to Cramton Bowl for a Saturday extravaganza as one of the top two teams in their age group.

The other team had fourth down inside the 5 in the final minute or so of the game. Ben tackled the runner short of the goal line and it seemed the game was over. Alas, there was a flag. Ben Marshall was offsides. On the next play, the other team scored and won the game.

I saw Ben get hit in the face with a fastball that turned his eye purple and refuse to leave a game. I saw him get all kinds of bruises as a catcher. I saw him take big hits in football that left him gasping for breath. That day was the only time I ever saw him cry because of an athletic event. He started to walk off the field and sank to his knees, sobbing. His teammates helped him to his feet.

Not one person said a derogatory word. If someone had and I had heard it, I don’t know what I would have done.

That game, of course, didn’t matter to anybody beyond the players and their coaches and the few dozen people who were there to support their children. I was reminded of that day when Krista Nix, mother of Bo, posted an extraordinarily gracious message on Facebook.

Bo Nix and others who compete for Auburn are uniquely talented, and they have earned unique opportunities. Ten days ago, he was everybody’s hero after a huge game against Mississippi State. Last Saturday, he was the subject of ridicule and scorn when he struggled mightily in a 24-13 loss at Florida.

That’s nothing new to the Nix family. Patrick Nix was an Auburn quarterback 25 years ago. He’s been a college position coach, a college offensive coordinator and a championship-winning high school coach. Conrad Nix, a renowned high school coach, is the man who started it all. Krista Nix has supported her men in good times and bad.

It’s sad that adults can be reduced to bashing a young man still a teen-ager because they wanted him to play football better, that they can dismiss everything good he’s done and call for him to be replaced because he had a bad day. That, sadly, is part of the modern fabric of college football.

Bo Nix handled the questions like a champion in the aftermath of a day he never wanted to experience and didn’t expect to experience. He was taught well. In the few minutes it took her to put her feelings into words, his mother rose above the noise, above those who would criticize her son for not doing things they could never dream of doing themselves.

“His stuff is more in the limelight because of who he is and what he does,” senior defensive tackle Derrick Brown said. “People comment on it, but they can’t get out there and do it.”

There’ll be great days, good days and probably more bad days for Bo Nix in his time at Auburn. Such is the life he has chosen. His family will experience those times of joy and time of pain with him.

51COMMENTS

“Bo is our guy,” senior Auburn running back Kam Martin said. “…Bo is a true winner. He’s a tough kid and he wants to get better. He’s going to.”

It’s a family thing.”

Okay, I'm confused....

Who's son is Ben?  Golf or Zeek?

:beer2:

Edited by AUsince72
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2 minutes ago, AUsince72 said:

 

Okay, I'm confused....

Who's son is Ben?  Golf or Zeek?

:beer2:

All I know is Golf could easily be my Grandpa 👴🏻 

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Awwww....I was all worried about Bo and now I'm worried about Ben too!!!

Seriously, Krista Nix seems like a really good, tough mom. I have mad respect for her, like I have for @Momma Worm. I would not be so gracious. I remember when a boy broke up with my daughter. I chewed him out royally!!! At church, no less! 😂 I'm a bit of a momma bear.

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Hhhmmm, I know my boys would look for a hole to hide in if their Mom (or me)  made public comments about their games or performance.  They wouldn't have wanted it in middle school and certainly not by the time they went to college.  As parents, we have to let our kids make their own way.  

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i am not sure where to put this but i got my new auburn shirt yesterday. it has a pic of bo slinging the ball and beneath it it says knows. bo knows. i just thought it was awesome and wanted to share. they have more on ebay.

bo knows.jpg

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On 10/10/2019 at 9:05 PM, HAYinthemiddleoftheBARN said:

Yeah I don't think I'll be starting topics anymore. I'd rather read & make comments. The Facebook post from Krista was what I loved so much I wanted to share, but you see how that went. Can't believe it wasn't already posted by someone else. Thanks. War Nix Eagle!!

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I dunno if I'd really try to equate an 11 year olds for fun leisure activity with a grown-ups entertainment career.

 

 

 

But I guess I dunno what that 11 year old was receiving in benefits either so... 🤷‍♂️

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16 hours ago, HAYinthemiddleoftheBARN said:

Yeah I don't think I'll be starting topics anymore. I'd rather read & make comments. The Facebook post from Krista was what I loved so much I wanted to share, but you see how that went. Can't believe it wasn't already posted by someone else. Thanks. War Nix Eagle!!

hey i appreciate you posting it a lot. i would never have seen it if you had not. i have mad love for most folks that post articles on here as i know what a pain it is. well for me anyway since i am a puter dummy.

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“His stuff is more in the limelight because of who he is and what he does,” senior defensive tackle Derrick Brown said. “People comment on it, but they can’t get out there and do it.”

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2 hours ago, tbone4jc said:

“His stuff is more in the limelight because of who he is and what he does,” senior defensive tackle Derrick Brown said. “People comment on it, but they can’t get out there and do it.”

L.O.L.

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