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Plains NIL Club


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Posted (edited)

This sounds like a better idea than most of what's going on currently. I will not give 25 cents to some pool whose purpose is to buy players. If this idea proves workable, I may be inclined to donate to it. While I'm not into contacting players on-line, the practice of distributing the $ evenly across the board sounds appealing.

Edited by Mikey
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This initiative should help recruiting. When top prospects see that Auburn has a players collective and word gets out of how much $$ comes in for everyone it'll draw attention.  

 

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1 hour ago, JerryAU said:

This initiative should help recruiting. When top prospects see that Auburn has a players collective and word gets out of how much $$ comes in for everyone it'll draw attention.  

 

Except it won't.

Example: $150,000 spread over 100 players (remember, no more roster limits, and this is ONLY if football is the primary beneficiary for this thing) is $1500. That's hardly going to move the needle and likely the kind of money that this is going to acquire.

 I just don't see how this is going to be worth the time it'll take to manage.

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It's going to come down to guys like Rane and who has the most of them willing to spend big on sports. I'm not optimistic about where Auburn falls in that landscape. The whole thing is just seedy and unfortunate to me. If you want to pay players, create a salary structure, cut the "student athlete" bunk and form a semi-pro league. NIL is a mess. 

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Posted (edited)

Auburn participates in NIL trading card deal

45 minutes ago

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Wiltfong Whiparound: Important recruiting weekend for several SEC programs

Auburn fans will soon be able to buy trading cards of some of their favorite current players.

Fanatics has announced that its trading card and collectibles division, Topps Trading Cards, have reached agreements with more than 100 college athletic programs for “broad-scale college physical and digital trading cards deals.” The deal will include trading cards of former college athletes, “incorporating official university trademarks,” along with current players, thanks to name, image and likeness compensation.

A Fanatics spokesperson confirmed to Auburn Undercover that Auburn “is a participating school in today’s announcement.”

Later this year, Topps will unveil the “non-exclusive program to design, manufacture and distribute trading cards showcasing current college football and basketball student-athletes …”

Additionally, Topps said in the release it has already secured individual trading cards rights, through NIL, for more than nearly 200 football, men’s basketball and women’s basketball players — including former Auburn quarterback Bo Nix, now at Oregon, along with Alabama’s Bryce Young, USC’s Caleb Williams and Georgia’s Stetson Bennett. Those cards will be released this fall.

A Fanatics spokesperson did not clarify whether Auburn has any players current set up with individual deals in the fall.

CLC, a top licensing agency utilized by college programs, “arranged the trading card licensing elements on behalf of most of the participating universities,” per the release.

@aubiefifty

Edited by toddc
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8 hours ago, woodford said:

Would be cool if we had an offensive line NIL club. I’d donate to that right now. 

Exactly. It's ridiculous that with every other school racking in recruits we can't even "incentivize" 3 stars to sign up for the offensive line

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7 hours ago, WDE_OxPx_2010 said:

Except it won't.

Example: $150,000 spread over 100 players (remember, no more roster limits, and this is ONLY if football is the primary beneficiary for this thing) is $1500. That's hardly going to move the needle and likely the kind of money that this is going to acquire.

 I just don't see how this is going to be worth the time it'll take to manage.

I have no interest in donating to something that will be spread evenly. That’s just for internet clout. I don’t care if the backup TE gets paid or not. 

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This is a good thing for the average player. Meanwhile the 5*s and high 4*s will be signing with programs that offer them the big paydays. A coach might have been the best recruiter under the old system but he will need more under the new one. He will need a good NIL program to back him up to remain on top and continue to sign elite classes.

Fans are going to have to get use to this and understand if their own coach doesn't have a good NIL program he will be playing with one hand tied behind his back. If that is the case they are going to have to adjust their expectations accordingly. The key of course is not being one of those programs lacking in a good NIL program.  

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56 minutes ago, woodford said:

I have no interest in donating to something that will be spread evenly. That’s just for internet clout. I don’t care if the backup TE gets paid or not. 

 

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11 hours ago, WDE_OxPx_2010 said:

Except it won't.

Example: $150,000 spread over 100 players (remember, no more roster limits, and this is ONLY if football is the primary beneficiary for this thing) is $1500. That's hardly going to move the needle and likely the kind of money that this is going to acquire.

 I just don't see how this is going to be worth the time it'll take to manage.

The scholarship limit remains at 85. It was the annual signee limit that was removed. Now, if walkons are to be included, the 100 number is close. I think 105 is the roster limit but 20 of those would have to be walkons. However, big dogs that got a pile to sign with AU initially shouldn't double dip into this fund. This fund should be for the 3* recruit who can use some additional $ to get through. In any case, a lot more than $150,000 would have to be raised to achieve the desired results.

Raise a half-million annually and every average player could get a boost north of $5,000. That will make a big difference.

My opinion is that in the long run the current setup is not sustainable. Unless some rules or laws are put into place, the rich will only get richer and this will not work to Auburn's benefit.

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 I think this NIL thing will eventually correct itself... Ol Joe Blow is gonna pay top $ to get the next great thing to come to his school. Then when said player doesn't pan out or worse transfers to another school , he is gonna get mad and pull his NIL support. Thing to remember is these folks that's paying all this NIL $ love their school, BUT they love their $ more .

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10 hours ago, Mikey said:

My opinion is that in the long run the current setup is not sustainable. Unless some rules or laws are put into place, the rich will only get richer and this will not work to Auburn's benefit.

You watch, next we'll see a salary cap like the NFL. What a circus.

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Creating more rules will only hurt everyone who is not a blue blood. A “Wild West” model is the best way to give everyone a chance to win. 
 

Why do you think Saban is crying about NIL? He knows that he will actually have to compete with schools other than Georgia, tOSU, Clemson, LSU, OU, etc. 

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15 hours ago, Mikey said:

The scholarship limit remains at 85. It was the annual signee limit that was removed. Now, if walkons are to be included, the 100 number is close. I think 105 is the roster limit but 20 of those would have to be walkons. However, big dogs that got a pile to sign with AU initially shouldn't double dip into this fund. This fund should be for the 3* recruit who can use some additional $ to get through. In any case, a lot more than $150,000 would have to be raised to achieve the desired results.

Raise a half-million annually and every average player could get a boost north of $5,000. That will make a big difference.

My opinion is that in the long run the current setup is not sustainable. Unless some rules or laws are put into place, the rich will only get richer and this will not work to Auburn's benefit.

I just read that abt 75% are included .

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1 hour ago, woodford said:

Creating more rules will only hurt everyone who is not a blue blood. A “Wild West” model is the best way to give everyone a chance to win. 
 

Why do you think Saban is crying about NIL? He knows that he will actually have to compete with schools other than Georgia, tOSU, Clemson, LSU, OU, etc. 

No he won't. The blue blood and already big named schools are the same ones who are going to be willing and able to pay the money. 

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  1. Auburn Football

Auburn football players partner to form Plains NIL Club

Updated: Jun. 10, 2022, 4:51 p.m. | Published: Jun. 10, 2022, 2:36 p.m.
Auburn offense A-Day

Per YOKE co-founder Bailey O'Sullivan, more than 75% of the Tigers football team has joined the Plains NIL Club.(AP Photo/Butch Dill)AP

 
 
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Player-led collectives have grown more common as some athletes worry about agents or other third parties taking a cut of their name, image and likeness deals. The most recent NIL trend swept through Alabama this past week with the formation of the Plains NIL Club.

 

Roughly three-quarters of the Auburn football roster partnered together with YOKE, a licensing company, to offer fans a way to engage with Tigers’ athletes throughout the season via an online membership. Bailey O’Sullivan, one of YOKE’s co-founders, told AL.com that “more than 75% of the team” has signed on.

 
 

Set to open this July, multiple Auburn players announced their intent to join, including senior starting center Nick Brahms, sophomore running back Jarquez Hunter and freshman quarterback Holden Geriner. Junior linebacker Kameron Brown said O’Sullivan, an Auburn alum, met with Auburn players over the last few weeks and each Tiger offered each an opportunity to join.

 
 
 

YOKE started in 2019, originally as a company that allowed Notre Dame football fans to play video games with Fighting Irish players. Mick Assaf and Nic Weishar, two co-founders with O’Sullivan and former Notre Dame football players, took the company into the NIL space with the “Irish Players Club” in 2021.

 
 

“It’s actually cool that you have people out there looking out for the team,” Brown said. “It helps out, regardless of any situation you’re in. It also helps you network. Going through this is going to help a lot of dudes meet some alumni for future jobs and stuff like that.”

 
 

A limited number of “access passes” are set to go on sale at a currently unannounced price point. Tigers fans will get access to interviews with players and in-person events throughout the season. It’s Auburn’s second-known collective, joining NIL-Auburn, though it just has members of the football squad for now. With the Plains NIL Club, Auburn’s players will split their earnings equally among themselves.

 
 
Football: Auburn vs Texas A&M

Auburn center Nick Brahms (52) is one of the many Auburn football players part of the Plains NIL Club. (Todd Van Emst/AU Athletics)Todd Van Emst/AU Athletics

 
 

Brown, a marketing major, believes that players are examining NIL opportunities more seriously now as state laws loosen and more money pours in. After talking with professors, he realized what many experts have identified as an issue: agents or others taking advantage of a player’s lack of NIL knowledge for a larger cut of their compensation or an eligibility-risking pay-for-play scenario.

 
 

As the NCAA continues to examine “egregious cases” and potential infractions against some donor-backed collectives, a player-led group could allow for less worry regarding compliance concerns.

 
 

“You just got to be smart about this stuff,” Brown said. “You need somebody to recheck you as well, we’re playing football all the time which means you’re going to forget about stuff if you’re not an organized person.”

 
 

RELATED: ‘I’m a business:’ Alabama recruits entering NIL landscape face ‘education gap’

 
 

Harsin, Aranda, others weigh in on college football’s NIL debate

 
 

Nick Alvarez is a reporter for Alabama Media Group. Follow him on Twitter @nick_a_alvarez or email him at NAlvarez@al.com.

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The money required to make this “Wild West” model work every year will make Gus’ buyout look like pocket change.  The most powerful employee in the athletic program is no longer the high paid coach, but whoever can run a successful NIL program capable of extracting tens of millions from boosters each year.

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3 hours ago, AUDevil said:

The money required to make this “Wild West” model work every year will make Gus’ buyout look like pocket change.  The most powerful employee in the athletic program is no longer the high paid coach, but whoever can run a successful NIL program capable of extracting tens of millions from boosters each year.

The entire model is unsustainable. The people with the net worth to sustain this aren't sitting on scrooge McDuck vaults, but mainly gaining wealth from assets. These people cannot afford to constantly drop 10+ mil a year for new people while continuing to pay the previous 3-4 classes 10+ mil/year

You're looking at greater than 40million a year to maintain these teams. That's just s***ty business. 

This time either marks the end of major college football and even the blue bloods become G5 talent wise or we see the a break-off from the NCAA to create a college owned semi pro league with salary caps, a draft etc. 

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1 hour ago, GunsmithAU said:

The entire model is unsustainable. The people with the net worth to sustain this aren't sitting on scrooge McDuck vaults, but mainly gaining wealth from assets. These people cannot afford to constantly drop 10+ mil a year for new people while continuing to pay the previous 3-4 classes 10+ mil/year

You're looking at greater than 40million a year to maintain these teams. That's just s***ty business. 

This time either marks the end of major college football and even the blue bloods become G5 talent wise or we see the a break-off from the NCAA to create a college owned semi pro league with salary caps, a draft etc. 

if it is truly not sustainable, the prices will move down. Its a market.

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