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New College Footbal Rules for 2006


AURainman

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ESPN

The NCAA rules committee approved eight rules changes in May that will take effect for the 2006 college football season. And while the amendments range from the mundane (shortening halftime) to the marked (instant replay will be used throughout Division I-A for the first time), it's a rule change governing the game clock that has aroused some coaches' ire.

According to Rule 3-2-5, the game clock will start as soon as the ball is kicked in a kickoff situation. Previously, the clock would only start once the receiving team touched the ball. In addition, Rule 3-2-5-e states that, after a team gets a first down, the clock will begin running again on the ready-for-play signal. Previously, the clock did not resume until the team snapped the ball.

While the rationale behind the changes was to shorten the game, that explanation has done little to quell the outrage of some coaches.

"I am appalled at the rule changes," Oregon coach Mike Bellotti told USA Today. "They are major and very severe and will change the game as we know it." :no::cry3:

Many coaches believe these changes will eliminate 10 to 15 plays per game.

"I think it will help the underdog teams," South Carolina coach Steve Spurrier told USA Today. "If you're the underdog, obviously you would like fewer plays in the game."

Penn State coach Joe Paterno brought out another perhaps unintended effect of the new rule.

"When you kick the ball, [the clock] starts. Kick it out of bounds with 8-10 seconds to go, the game's over," Paterno said to USA Today. "We've got to expose our kids to it in preseason practice."

Auburn head coach Tommy Tuberville, who sits on the NCAA rules committee, tried to answer some of the criticisms offered by his colleagues.

"We weren't looking to take plays away from the game," Tuberville told USA Today. "We were looking to … get away from some of these 3-hour, 45-minute games in hot weather or cold weather. This is obviously an experiment. Anything we do in the rules committee can be changed next year."

First let me say that I think the rule changes are STUPID, but I'm not about to weep about it like the frickin' Oregon coach. Hey coach, grow a pair. "ITS THE END OF COLLEGE FOOTBALL AS WE KNOW IT!!!!!"

Second, isn't Paterno blowing this out of proportion? If you kick the ball out of bounds, the clock SHOULD stop, right? They haven't said that the clock will run continuously from Kickoff to first play are they? My interpretation of the rule is..."Foot makes contact, clock starts. Player gets tackled, clock stops. Ball is snapped, clock starts." Am I wrong? Does the clock keep moving?

And lastly, what game have I been watching? Doesn't the clock ALREADY start when the chains are set on a first down? That didn't change.

Am I losing my mind here?

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Hey Mods!!!!

That's a different article. A completely different topic.

The first was a bunch of "suggested rules" for football fans.

Mine was actual RULE CHANGES for the game of football.

Who's got the quick trigger finger? ;)

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My bad. I'd just read the article, saw both of you had ESPN as the link and didn't check to be sure. :wacko:

I split them back...

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I don't like Tubs comments. The games only last a lil over two hours. It's the commercials that make it last 3:45 - but it's all about the money right

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I haven't seen anyone complain that "we are on TV TOO much". How do you think we end up on TV? Because we are an attractive team to sponsors that buy advertising time. Look I hate commercials as well but they are an evil that cannot be changed now....Everyone wants shorter broadcasts of games but still wants them broadcast. What is the alternative? The camel has his nose under the tent now and his arse is following so yes it IS all about the money.

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With the new rule stating that the clock will start when the ball is kicked, a strong legged kicker can come in handy if just took the lead and you are up by 5 with 3-4 seconds on the clock. If your kicker has a leg and can kick it threw the endzone, GAME OVER!!

On kicking it out of bounds to avoid a return, well the game can't end on a penalty that will benefit the trailing team, so they would still get to run a play.

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I heard somewhere that the SEC was the only conference to average just over 3 hours. I wonder why? Oh yeah thats right, bc the SEC is the conference that most resembles the NFL where they have no problems with game times.

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And lastly, what game have I been watching? Doesn't the clock ALREADY start when the chains are set on a first down? That didn't change.

You are correct....but what they are referring to here is a "change of possession". For example: Team A faces 4th and 10, elects to punt....Team B either fair catches it or returns it either one...Once the ball is placed and is "ready for play" for team B the clock will start on that "ready for play signal" instead of on the snap.

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On kicking it out of bounds to avoid a return, well the game can't end on a penalty that will benefit the trailing team, so they would still get to run a play.

Game or half can not end on a defensive penalty (unless declined) regardless of which team is trailing. Maybe you said the same thing, I just know the rule in a different form.

On change of possessions and kickoffs, I think an easy way to understand this new rule is to remember that the 24 second clock and the game clock will now both start when the refree signals the ball ready for play. Previously, the game clock did not start until the ball was snapped.

I think this is the way is will be.

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Game or half can not end on a defensive penalty (unless declined) regardless of which team is trailing. Maybe you said the same thing, I just know the rule in a different form

yeah we are on the same page here....

On change of possessions and kickoffs, I think an easy way to understand this new rule is to remember that the 24 second clock and the game clock will now both start when the refree signals the ball ready for play. Previously, the game clock did not start until the ball was snapped.

I think this is the way is will be

On the kickoffs the clock won't start until the ball is kicked....not when its ref signals "ready for play". I don't think there is a "play clock" on kickoffs anyway. So, i think we are on the same page on this topic also, just that your statement comes across as the clock starting when the ref signals "ready for play"on a "kickoff", when in actuality on a kickoff its when the ball is kicked....you are correct on the change of possession though.

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actually there is a play clock on kickoffs just like there is on any other scrimmage down. otherwise teams could just take forever to get their kicking teams on the field and kickoff...

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I was referring to clock starting after kickoff. My understanding is this series of events:

Refree puts ball into play for kickoff - 24 sec clock starts.

Ball is kicked - game clock starts.

Receiving team advances ball or ball out of field of play and play is blown dead - game clock stops and is started again when refree signals ball in play.

Is this correct??

I have heard that the game clock will continue to run after the receiving player is tackled but I think the clock will stop at this point to set the chains just like on any 1st down play.

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actually there is a play clock on kickoffs just like there is on any other scrimmage down. otherwise teams could just take forever to get their kicking teams on the field and kickoff...

well I guess I've just never noticed, as its normally a non-factor. But I would have to guess that the "game clock" still doesn't start until the ball is kicked on a kickoff, and not when the ref signals "ready for play" right?

If not then if you score a TD with less than 25 seconds to go in the game, the GAME IS OVER!! So it has to be when the ball is kicked!!

Anyhow, I'm just ready to see some football!!!

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I was referring to clock starting after kickoff. My understanding is this series of events:

Refree puts ball into play for kickoff - 24 sec clock starts.

Ball is kicked - game clock starts.

Receiving team advances ball or ball out of field of play and play is blown dead - game clock stops and is started again when refree signals ball in play.

Is this correct??

I have heard that the game clock will continue to run after the receiving player is tackled but I think the clock will stop at this point to set the chains just like on any 1st down play.

you're right.... just a misunderstanding on my part of what you said in the quote below.

On change of possessions and kickoffs, I think an easy way to understand this new rule is to remember that the 24 second clock and the game clock will now both start when the refree signals the ball ready for play. Previously, the game clock did not start until the ball was snapped.

I think this is the way is will be

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actually there is a play clock on kickoffs just like there is on any other scrimmage down. otherwise teams could just take forever to get their kicking teams on the field and kickoff...

well I guess I've just never noticed, as its normally a non-factor. But I would have to guess that the "game clock" still doesn't start until the ball is kicked on a kickoff, and not when the ref signals "ready for play" right?

Absolutely correct. play clock is actually 25 seconds...not 24

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The kickoff rule change is bizarre for 2 reasons. Their stated reason for these changes is to keep the games from last 3 hours 45 minutes. How many kickoffs are there in a game and how many seconds are you saving by changing the rule from the clock starting when received, vs. @ kickoff? Paterno says with a STRONG legged kicker, 8-10 seconds per kickoff are saved. So w/ a 6 touchdown game you save...60 seconds? WOW!

Second, many out of bound penalty kicks hit in bounds and roll a bit before going out, often beyond the returners control. Kick it off w/ 8-10 seconds (Paterno again) and the clock runs out BEFORE it goes out of bounds. No penalty, clock ran out before it went out of bounds. Even though it was kicked out of bounds, that penalty is truncated in this not unlikely situation. We'll probably never see a game winning kickoff as the clock runs out again. Unless Phil Fulmer is coaching the team kicking off.

Rule changes like must have little thought behind them.

I'll be interested in seeing how much they can expedite instant replay reviews.

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Kick it off w/ 8-10 seconds (Paterno again) and the clock runs out BEFORE it goes out of bounds. No penalty, clock ran out before it went out of bounds. Even though it was kicked out of bounds, that penalty is truncated in this not unlikely situation.

Incorrect. Although not exact, this is the closest interpretation I could find in the NCAA rule book:

II. Time expires during Team A’s free kick. A1 is offside on the kick.

RULING: Penalty—Five yards from the previous spot, the end of

Team B’s run, or the touchback spot, and the period is extended.

Repeat the free kick or Team B is awarded an untimed down.

A kickoff out of bounds would be a penalty equivalent to being offsides for the purposes of ending a game on a kickoff, that is to say, the game wouldn't end on a kickoff out of bounds, presuming the receiving team doesn't touch it first.

On a slightly different note...

If the NCAA were serious about wanting to shorten the game, they'd do away with the temporary clock stoppages after first down plays that don't go out of bounds. I don't see that coming in the near future.

What I WOULD like to see them do is implement a :35 play clock that starts as soon as the previous play is blown dead. Some refs get the ball spotted for play reasonably quickly, others lollygag around and easily kill :15 between plays before the :25 clock even starts. This would remove that inconsistency.

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"A kickoff out of bounds would be a penalty equivalent to being offsides for the purposes of ending a game on a kickoff, that is to say, the game wouldn't end on a kickoff out of bounds, presuming the receiving team doesn't touch it first."

Nope. Offsides is a deadball penalty because the clock (which was not running @ the time of the infraction) would not have started. The ball rolling out of bounds AFTER a kickoff (when the clock would have started, under the new rules) is a totally different fact (and penalty) scenario.

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The mere fact of a kicking team being offsides does not automatically make a play dead, like, say, a false start on the offense does.

The example that I pulled directly from the NCAA rule book illustrates this by mentioning that time runs out on a play where the kicking team is offsides...the kickoff and subsequent return (if there is one) would take place, you'd sort out the penalty and then there'd be an untimed down.

You'd have the exact same result if the kickoff goes out of bounds without being touched.

The overarching premise is this: A penalty on the kicking team when time expires does not end a period/game. It's the same principle as a period/game being extended because of a defensive penalty.

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"The overarching premise is this: A penalty on the kicking team when time expires does not end a period/game".

More correctly, a penalty on the kicking team BEFORE TIME EXPIRES does not end a period/game. There is no penalty other than unsportsmalike conduct AFTER time expires. Your offsides quote from the NCAA illustrative narratives applies to a penalty that occurs when time is STILL on the clock. That is the key difference. Maybe the scenario is not clear:

1. 8 seconds on game clock

2. ball is kicked and seconds go by w/ the ball in the air. (because the new rule STARTS the clock ON the kick. Previously it started when the receiver touched it).

3. ball hits the ground IN BOUNDS where it rolls untouched by any player.

4. CLOCK EXPIRES.

5. Ball rolls out of bounds AFTER time expires.

This is a VERY common scenario we'll see frequently this season and a huge asterisk has been applied to the "no kicking the kickoff out of bounds" penalty.

In other words, an average Div. 1 KICKER can now basically prevent a game winning touchdown return as time expires. This rule is more likely to take an exciting play situation out of the sport than it is to help the sport (by, uh, saving time).

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I hate the changes, football season is too short to begin with and now they are going to cheat me out of 3-4 series a game that stinks and they are going to replace the plays with commercials!!!!!! I'm glad I have Tivo :big:

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1. 8 seconds on game clock

2. ball is kicked and seconds go by w/ the ball in the air. (because the new rule STARTS the clock ON the kick. Previously it started when the receiver touched it).

3. ball hits the ground IN BOUNDS where it rolls untouched by any player.

4. CLOCK EXPIRES.

5. Ball rolls out of bounds AFTER time expires.

...and that is a penalty that would be enforced and the game would be extended. The fact that the clock runs out in the middle of the play is immaterial.

If a defender commits pass interference on the last play of the game and the clock runs out in progress, the game is not over. A kickoff going out of bounds is no different.

I

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1. 8 seconds on game clock

2. ball is kicked and seconds go by w/ the ball in the air. (because the new rule STARTS the clock ON the kick. Previously it started when the receiver touched it).

3. ball hits the ground IN BOUNDS where it rolls untouched by any player.

4. CLOCK EXPIRES.

5. Ball rolls out of bounds AFTER time expires.

...and that is a penalty that would be enforced and the game would be extended. The fact that the clock runs out in the middle of the play is immaterial.

If a defender commits pass interference on the last play of the game and the clock runs out in progress, the game is not over. A kickoff going out of bounds is no different.

I

CORRECT!!!

Some are forgetting that THE GAME CANNOT END ON A DEFENSIVE PENALTY (unless the penalty is declined). On a kickoff the "kicking team" is the defensive team. So if the kicking team commits a penalty, whether it be holding, personal foul, or "kick out of bounds", it doesn't matter, the receiving team will get a free play from scrimmage with no clock running.

Where the good kicker comes handy is with 4-5 seconds on the clock and the kicker kicks it through the endzone. GAME OVER!!

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